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From Marc Slemko <ma...@worldgate.com>
Subject Re: os_canonical_filename() ?
Date Sat, 10 Jan 1998 19:00:54 GMT
On Sun, 11 Jan 1998, Brian Havard wrote:

> On Wed, 7 Jan 1998 08:11:31 -0700 (MST), Marc Slemko wrote:
> 
> >On Wed, 7 Jan 1998, Brian Havard wrote:
> >
> >> While trying to sort out some case (in)sensitivity problems I came across the
> >> os_canonical_filename() function. Can anyone explain just what it does and
> >> why? Do I need to write one for OS/2?
> >
> >It tries to convert a path into some form that is considered canonical. 
> >The goal is that there should be no way for two paths to not be identical
> >in a strcmp() and refer to the same thing.  Obviously this would exclude
> >symlinks, etc. as those really refer to different things.
> 
> OK, so why is it necessary for Win32 but not for Unix? Have things like "."
> and ".." already been dealt with? Relative vs absolute paths?

Yes.  /../, /./, //, etc. are all handled elsewhere for two reasons.  One,
they are not really entirely filesystem specific.  Two, they were areound
before os_canonical_filename.  The only need for os_canonical_filename is
on systems thta go "above and beyond" strangeness.


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