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From iga...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1041010 - in /httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual: install.xml mod/core.xml
Date Wed, 01 Dec 2010 13:51:31 GMT
Author: igalic
Date: Wed Dec  1 13:51:30 2010
New Revision: 1041010

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc?rev=1041010&view=rev
Log:
Minor fixes in spelling/grammar/xml/versions

Modified:
    httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/install.xml
    httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/mod/core.xml

Modified: httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/install.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/install.xml?rev=1041010&r1=1041009&r2=1041010&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/install.xml (original)
+++ httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/install.xml Wed Dec  1 13:51:30 2010
@@ -337,7 +337,7 @@ $ tar xvf httpd-<em>NN</em>.tar
     <p>The first step in upgrading is to read the release announcement
     and the file <code>CHANGES</code> in the source distribution to
     find any changes that may affect your site.  When changing between
-    major releases (for example, from 1.3 to 2.0 or from 2.0 to 2.2),
+    major releases (for example, from 2.0 to 2.2 or from 2.2 to 2.3),
     there will likely be major differences in the compile-time and
     run-time configuration that will require manual adjustments.  All
     modules will also need to be upgraded to accomodate changes in the

Modified: httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/mod/core.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/mod/core.xml?rev=1041010&r1=1041009&r2=1041010&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/mod/core.xml (original)
+++ httpd/httpd/trunk/docs/manual/mod/core.xml Wed Dec  1 13:51:30 2010
@@ -36,11 +36,11 @@ available</description>
 On Windows from Apache httpd 2.3.3 and later.</compatibility>
 
 <usage>
-    <p>This directive enables operating system specific optimizations for a 
-       listening socket by the Protocol type. The basic premise is for the 
-       kernel to not send a socket to the server process until either data 
-       is received or an entire HTTP Request is buffered. Only
-       <a href="http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=accept_filter&amp;sektion=9">
+    <p>This directive enables operating system specific optimizations for a
+       listening socket by the <directive>Protocol</directive>type.
+       The basic premise is for the kernel to not send a socket to the server
+       process until either data is received or an entire HTTP Request is buffered.
+       Only <a href="http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=accept_filter&amp;sektion=9">
        FreeBSD's Accept Filters</a>, Linux's more primitive 
        <code>TCP_DEFER_ACCEPT</code>, and Windows' optimized AcceptEx()
        are currently supported.</p>
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ On Windows from Apache httpd 2.3.3 and l
        the <code>connect</code> option does not wait for the initial data
        transmission.</p>
 
-    <p>On Windows, <code>none</code> uses accept() rather than than AcceptEx()
+    <p>On Windows, <code>none</code> uses accept() rather than AcceptEx()
        and will not recycle sockets between connections.  This is useful for
        network adapters with broken driver support, as well as some virtual
        network providers such as vpn drivers, or spam, virus or spyware
@@ -2289,6 +2289,7 @@ URLs</description>
 
     <p>The enclosed directives will be applied to the request if the path component
     of the URL meets <em>any</em> of the following criteria:
+    </p>
     <ul>
       <li>The specified location matches exactly the path component of the URL.
       </li>
@@ -2299,21 +2300,24 @@ URLs</description>
       prefix of the path component of the URL (also treated as a context root).
       </li>
     </ul>
+    <p>
     In the example below, where no trailing slash is used, requests to 
     /private1, /private1/ and /private1/file.txt will have the enclosed
     directives applied, but /private1other would not. 
+    </p>
     <example>
       &lt;Location /private1&gt;
           ...
     </example>
+    <p>
     In the example below, where a trailing slash is used, requests to 
     /private2/ and /private2/file.txt will have the enclosed
     directives applied, but /private2 and /private2other would not. 
+    </p>
     <example>
       &lt;Location /private2<em>/</em>&gt;
           ...
     </example>
-    </p>
 
     <note><title>When to use <directive 
     type="section">Location</directive></title>



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