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From sl...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: httpd-2.0/docs/manual content-negotiation.html.en content-negotiation.xml
Date Sun, 06 Apr 2003 18:16:11 GMT
slive       2003/04/06 11:16:11

  Modified:    docs/manual content-negotiation.html.en
                        content-negotiation.xml
  Log:
  The content-negotiation docs are a little misleading about what the
  RFC says.
  
  PR: 18443
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.42      +4 -7      httpd-2.0/docs/manual/content-negotiation.html.en
  
  Index: content-negotiation.html.en
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/httpd-2.0/docs/manual/content-negotiation.html.en,v
  retrieving revision 1.41
  retrieving revision 1.42
  diff -u -d -b -u -r1.41 -r1.42
  --- content-negotiation.html.en	26 Mar 2003 23:13:06 -0000	1.41
  +++ content-negotiation.html.en	6 Apr 2003 18:16:11 -0000	1.42
  @@ -410,7 +410,7 @@
   <div class="example"><p><code>Accept: image/*, */*</code></p></div>
   
       <p>would indicate that any type starting "image/" is acceptable,
  -    as is any other type (so the first "image/*" is redundant).
  +    as is any other type.
       Some browsers routinely send wildcards in addition to explicit
       types they can handle. For example:</p>
   
  @@ -419,11 +419,8 @@
   </code></p></div>
       <p>The intention of this is to indicate that the explicitly listed
       types are preferred, but if a different representation is
  -    available, that is ok too. However under the basic algorithm,
  -    as given above, the */* wildcard has exactly equal preference
  -    to all the other types, so they are not being preferred. The
  -    browser should really have sent a request with a lower quality
  -    (preference) value for *.*, such as:</p>
  +    available, that is ok too.  Using explicit quality values,
  +    what the browser really wants is something like:</p>
   <div class="example"><p><code>
     Accept: text/html, text/plain, image/gif, image/jpeg, */*; q=0.01
   </code></p></div>
  @@ -439,7 +436,7 @@
       preferred over matches against "*/*". If any media type on the
       Accept: header contains a q factor, these special values are
       <em>not</em> applied, so requests from browsers which send the
  -    correct information to start with work as expected.</p>
  +    explicit information to start with work as expected.</p>
   
   
   <h3><a name="exceptions" id="exceptions">Language Negotiation Exceptions</a></h3>
  
  
  
  1.5       +4 -7      httpd-2.0/docs/manual/content-negotiation.xml
  
  Index: content-negotiation.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/httpd-2.0/docs/manual/content-negotiation.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -d -b -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- content-negotiation.xml	23 Mar 2003 04:04:44 -0000	1.4
  +++ content-negotiation.xml	6 Apr 2003 18:16:11 -0000	1.5
  @@ -395,7 +395,7 @@
   <example>Accept: image/*, */*</example>
   
       <p>would indicate that any type starting "image/" is acceptable,
  -    as is any other type (so the first "image/*" is redundant).
  +    as is any other type.
       Some browsers routinely send wildcards in addition to explicit
       types they can handle. For example:</p>
   
  @@ -404,11 +404,8 @@
   </example>
       <p>The intention of this is to indicate that the explicitly listed
       types are preferred, but if a different representation is
  -    available, that is ok too. However under the basic algorithm,
  -    as given above, the */* wildcard has exactly equal preference
  -    to all the other types, so they are not being preferred. The
  -    browser should really have sent a request with a lower quality
  -    (preference) value for *.*, such as:</p>
  +    available, that is ok too.  Using explicit quality values,
  +    what the browser really wants is something like:</p>
   <example>
     Accept: text/html, text/plain, image/gif, image/jpeg, */*; q=0.01
   </example>
  @@ -424,7 +421,7 @@
       preferred over matches against "*/*". If any media type on the
       Accept: header contains a q factor, these special values are
       <em>not</em> applied, so requests from browsers which send the
  -    correct information to start with work as expected.</p>
  +    explicit information to start with work as expected.</p>
   </section>
   
   <section id="exceptions"><title>Language Negotiation Exceptions</title>
  
  
  

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