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From sl...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: httpd-docs-1.3/htdocs/manual urlmapping.html
Date Fri, 24 Aug 2001 02:23:52 GMT
slive       01/08/23 19:23:52

  Modified:    htdocs/manual urlmapping.html
  Log:
  Wow, I can write some nasty, heavy prose.  This lightens it up a touch.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.3       +49 -54    httpd-docs-1.3/htdocs/manual/urlmapping.html
  
  Index: urlmapping.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/httpd-docs-1.3/htdocs/manual/urlmapping.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -d -b -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- urlmapping.html	2001/03/12 00:10:06	1.2
  +++ urlmapping.html	2001/08/24 02:23:52	1.3
  @@ -15,9 +15,8 @@
   <!--#include virtual="header.html" -->
   <h1 align="center">Mapping URLs to Filesystem Locations</h1>
   
  -<p>This document explains the method in which Apache determines
  -what filesystem location to serve a file from based on the
  -URL of a request.</p>
  +<p>This document explains how Apache determines the filesystem
  +location from which to serve a file using the URL of a request.</p>
   
   <ul>
   <li><a href="#documentroot">DocumentRoot</a></li>
  @@ -63,7 +62,7 @@
   
   <p>In deciding what file to serve for a given request, Apache's
   default behavior is to take the URL-Path for the request (the part of
  -the URL following the first single slash) and add it to the end of the
  +the URL following the hostname and port) and add it to the end of the
   <a href="mod/core.html#documentroot">DocumentRoot</a> specified in
   your configuration files.  Therefore, the files and directories
   underneath the <code>DocumentRoot</code> make up the basic document
  @@ -80,18 +79,17 @@
   <h2><a name="outside">Files Outside the DocumentRoot</a></h2>
   
   <p>There are frequently circumstances where it is necessary to allow
  -web access to parts of the filesystem which are not strictly
  -underneath the <a href="mod/core.html#documentroot">DocumentRoot</a>.
  -Apache offers several different ways to accomplish this.  On Unix
  -systems, symbolic links can be used to bring other parts of the
  -filesystem under the <code>DocumentRoot</code>.  For security reasons,
  -symbolic links will only be followed if the <a
  -href="mod/core.html#options">Options</a> setting for the relevant
  -directory includes <code>FollowSymLinks</code> or
  -<code>SymLinksIfOwnerMatch</code>.</p>
  +web access to parts of the filesystem that are not strictly underneath
  +the <a href="mod/core.html#documentroot">DocumentRoot</a>.  Apache
  +offers several different ways to accomplish this.  On Unix systems,
  +symbolic links can bring other parts of the filesystem under the
  +<code>DocumentRoot</code>.  For security reasons, Apache will follow
  +symbolic links only if the <a href="mod/core.html#options">Options</a>
  +setting for the relevant directory includes
  +<code>FollowSymLinks</code> or <code>SymLinksIfOwnerMatch</code>.</p>
   
   <p>Alternatively, the <a href="mod/mod_alias.html#alias">Alias</a>
  -directive can be used to map any part of the filesystem into the web
  +directive will map any part of the filesystem into the web
   space.  For example, with</p>
   
   <blockquote><code>Alias /docs /var/web/
  @@ -103,10 +101,10 @@
   the same way, with the additional effect that all content located at
   the target path is treated as CGI scripts.</p>
   
  -<p>For situations where additional flexibility is required, the <a
  -href="mod/mod_alias.html#aliasmatch">AliasMatch</a> and <a
  +<p>For situations where you require additional flexibility, you can
  +use the <a href="mod/mod_alias.html#aliasmatch">AliasMatch</a> and <a
   href="mod/mod_alias.html#scriptaliasmatch">ScriptAliasMatch</a>
  -directives can do powerful <a
  +directives to do powerful <a
   href="misc/FAQ.html#regex">regular-expression</a> based matching and
   substitution.  For example,</p>
   
  @@ -128,19 +126,19 @@
   
   <blockquote><code>http://www.example.com/~user/file.html</code></blockquote>
   
  -<p>For security reasons, it would be inappropriate to give direct
  +<p>For security reasons, it is inappropriate to give direct
   access to a user's home directory from the web.  Therefore, the <a
  -href="mod/mod_userdir.html#userdir">UserDir</a> directive is used to
  -specify a directory underneath the user's home directory where web
  -files will be located.  Using the default setting of <code>Userdir
  -public_html</code>, the above URL would look for a file at a directory
  -like <code>/home/user/public_html/file.html</code> where the
  +href="mod/mod_userdir.html#userdir">UserDir</a> directive
  +specifies a directory underneath the user's home directory where web
  +files are located.  Using the default setting of <code>Userdir
  +public_html</code>, the above URL maps to a file at a directory
  +like <code>/home/user/public_html/file.html</code> where
   <code>/home/user/</code> is the user's home directory as specified in
   <code>/etc/passwd</code>.</p>
   
   <p>There are also several other forms of the <code>Userdir</code>
  -directive which can be used on systems where <code>/etc/passwd</code>
  -cannot be used to find the location of the home directory.</p>
  +directive which you can use on systems where <code>/etc/passwd</code>
  +does not contain the location of the home directory.</p>
   
   <p>Some people find the "~" symbol (which is often encoded on the web
   as <code>%7e</code>) to be awkward and prefer to use an alternate
  @@ -150,8 +148,8 @@
   href="mod/mod_alias.html#aliasmatch">AliasMatch</a> directive to
   achieve the desired effect.  For example, to make
   <code>http://www.example.com/upages/user/file.html</code> map to
  -<code>/home/user/public_html/file.html</code>, the following
  -<code>AliasMatch</code> directive can be used.</p>
  +<code>/home/user/public_html/file.html</code>, use the following
  +<code>AliasMatch</code> directive:</p>
   
   <blockquote><code>
   AliasMatch  ^/upages/([^/]*)/?(.*) /home/$1/public_html/$2 
  @@ -159,41 +157,38 @@
   
   <h2><a name="redirect">URL Redirection</a></h2>
   
  -<p>The configuration directives discussed in the above sections are
  -used to tell Apache to get content from a specific place in the
  -filesystem and return it to the client.  Sometimes, it is desirable
  -instead to inform the client that the content being requested is
  -located at an different URL, and instruct the client to make a new
  -request with the new URL.  This is referred to as <em>redirection</em>
  -and is implemented by the <a
  -href="mod/mod_alias.html#redirect">Redirect</a> directive.  For example,
  -if the contents of the directory <code>/foo/</code> under the
  -<code>DocumentRoot</code> have been moved to the new directory
  -<code>/bar/</code>, clients can instructed to request the content at
  -the new location as follows.</p>
  +<p>The configuration directives discussed in the above sections tell
  +Apache to get content from a specific place in the filesystem and
  +return it to the client.  Sometimes, it is desirable instead to inform
  +the client that the requested content is located at a different
  +URL, and instruct the client to make a new request with the new URL.
  +This is called <em>redirection</em> and is implemented by the
  +<a href="mod/mod_alias.html#redirect">Redirect</a> directive.  For
  +example, if the contents of the directory <code>/foo/</code> under the
  +<code>DocumentRoot</code> are moved to the new directory
  +<code>/bar/</code>, you can instruct clients to request the content at
  +the new location as follows:</p>
   
   <blockquote><code>Redirect permanent
   /foo/ http://www.example.com/bar/</code></blockquote>
   
   <p>This will redirect any URL-Path starting in <code>/foo/</code> to
   the same URL path on the <code>www.example.com</code> server with
  -<code>/bar/</code> substituted for <code>/foo/</code>.  Note that
  -clients can be redirected to any server, not only the origin
  -server.</p>
  +<code>/bar/</code> substituted for <code>/foo/</code>.  You can
  +redirect clients to any server, not only the origin server.</p>
   
   <p>Apache also provides a <a
   href="mod/mod_alias.html#redirectmatch">RedirectMatch</a> directive
  -which can be used for more complicated rewriting problems.  For
  -example, to redirect requests for the site home page to a different
  -site, but leave all other requests alone, the following configuration
  -can be used.</p>
  +for more complicated rewriting problems.  For example, to redirect
  +requests for the site home page to a different site, but leave all
  +other requests alone, use the following configuration:</p>
   
   <blockquote><code>
   RedirectMatch permanent ^/$ http://www.example.com/startpage.html
   </code></blockquote>
   
   <p>Alternatively, to temporarily redirect all pages on a site to one
  -particular page, the following configuration is useful.</p>
  +particular page, use the following:</p>
   
   <blockquote><code>
   RedirectMatch temp .* http://www.example.com/startpage.html
  @@ -203,7 +198,7 @@
   
   <p>When even more powerful substitution is required, the rewriting
   engine provided by <a href="mod/mod_rewrite.html">mod_rewrite</a> can
  -be useful.  The directives provided by this module can use
  +be useful.  The directives provided by this module use
   characteristics of the request such as browser type or source IP
   address in deciding from where to serve content.  In addition,
   mod_rewrite can use external database files or programs to determine
  @@ -232,12 +227,12 @@
   be presented to the client.</p>
   
   <p>An especially useful feature of mod_speling, is that it will
  -compare filenames without respect to case.  This can be useful for
  -systems where users are unaware of the case-sensitive nature of URLs
  -and the unix filesystem.  However, using mod_speling for anything more
  -than the occasional URL correction can lead to additional load on the
  -server, since each "incorrect" request is followed by a URL
  -redirection and a new request from the client.</p>
  +compare filenames without respect to case.  This can help systems
  +where users are unaware of the case-sensitive nature of URLs and the
  +unix filesystem.  But using mod_speling for anything more than the
  +occasional URL correction can place additional load on the server,
  +since each "incorrect" request is followed by a URL redirection and a
  +new request from the client.</p>
   
   <p>If all attempts to locate the content fail, Apache returns an error
   page with HTTP status code 404 (file not found).  The appearance of
  
  
  

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