httpd-cvs mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From r..@hyperreal.org
Subject cvs commit: apache-1.3/src README.DSO
Date Wed, 06 May 1998 15:44:31 GMT
rse         98/05/06 08:44:31

  Modified:    .        README.configure INSTALL
               src      README.DSO
  Log:
  Make some documents up-to-date for the 1.3b7 release.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.8       +19 -20    apache-1.3/README.configure
  
  Index: README.configure
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /export/home/cvs/apache-1.3/README.configure,v
  retrieving revision 1.7
  retrieving revision 1.8
  diff -u -r1.7 -r1.8
  --- README.configure	1998/04/29 06:24:53	1.7
  +++ README.configure	1998/05/06 15:44:25	1.8
  @@ -78,9 +78,10 @@
   
     Additionally if some of the shown paths still don't fit for your particular
     situation, you can use the --bindir, --sbindir, --libexecdir, --mandir,
  -  --sysconfdir, --datadir and --localstatedir options to adjust the layout as
  -  required. Always check with --layout the resulting directory layout which
  -  would be used for installation.
  +  --sysconfdir, --datadir, --localstatedir, --runtimedir, --logfiledir and
  +  --proxycachedir options to adjust the layout as required. Always check with
  +  --layout the resulting directory layout which would be used for
  +  installation.
   
     suEXEC support
     --------------
  @@ -116,15 +117,15 @@
   
     Then APACI first determines the GNU platform triple, creates a shadow tree
     in src.<gnu-triple> plus corresponding Makefile.<gnu-triple> and then
  -  performs the complete build process with this shadow tree.
  +  performs the complete build process inside this shadow tree.
   
     Dynamic Shared Object (DSO) support
     -----------------------------------
   
  -  Apache 1.3 supports building modules as shared objects on all major
  +  Apache 1.3 supports building modules as shared objects on all major Unix
     platforms (see section "Supported Platforms" in file src/README.DSO for
  -  details).  APACI has a nice way of enabling the building of these shared
  -  objects and automatically installing them:
  +  details).  APACI has a nice way of enabling the building of DSO-based
  +  modules and automatically installing them:
   
       $ ./configure --prefix=/path/to/apache \
                     --enable-module=rewrite \
  @@ -134,11 +135,9 @@
   
     This builds and installs Apache with the default configuration except that
     it adds the mod_rewrite module and automatically builds and installs it as a
  -  shared object, so it is optionally available for loading under runtime.  To
  -  make your live even more easy APACI additionally inserts a corresponding
  -  (but out-commented) `LoadModule' line in the httpd.conf file in the
  -  installation phase. Just uncomment this line and you have mod_rewrite
  -  available.
  +  DSO, so it is optionally available for loading under runtime.  To make your
  +  life even more easy APACI additionally inserts a corresponding `LoadModule'
  +  line into the httpd.conf file in the installation phase.
   
     APACI also supports a variant of the --enable-shared option:
   
  @@ -149,7 +148,7 @@
   
     This enables shared object building for the maximum of modules, i.e. all
     enabled modules (--enable-module or the default set) except for mod_so
  -  itself (the bootstrapping module for shared object support). So, to build a
  +  itself (the bootstrapping module for DSO support). So, to build a
     full-powered Apache with maximum flexibility by building and installing most
     of the modules, you can use:
   
  @@ -162,8 +161,8 @@
     This first enables most of the modules (all modules except some problematic
     ones like mod_auth_db which needs third party libraries not available on
     every platform or mod_log_agent and mod_log_referer which are deprecated)
  -  and then enables shared object support for all of them. This way you get all
  -  these modules installed and you then can configure under runtime (via the
  +  and then enables DSO support for all of them. This way you get all these
  +  modules installed and you then can decide under runtime (via the
     `LoadModule') directives which ones are actually used. Especially a very
     useful for vendor package maintainers to provide a flexible Apache package.
   
  @@ -184,7 +183,7 @@
   
     This automatically copies mod_foo.c to src/modules/extra/, activates it in
     the configuration and builds Apache with it. A very useful way is to combine
  -  this with the shared object support:
  +  this with the DSO support:
   
       $ ./configure --prefix=/path/to/apache \
                     --add-module=/path/to/mod_foo.c \
  @@ -193,8 +192,8 @@
       $ make install
   
     This builds and installs Apache with the default set of modules, but
  -  additionally builds mod_foo as a shared object and adds a `LoadModule' line
  -  to the httpd.conf file, so later you can enable this mod_foo under runtime.
  +  additionally builds mod_foo as a DSO and adds a `LoadModule' line to the
  +  httpd.conf file to activate it for loading under runtime.
   
     Apache and mod_perl
     -------------------
  @@ -206,7 +205,7 @@
     mod_perl-1.XX.tar.gz can be found on http://perl.apache.org/src/. Here is
     how you can install Apache with mod_perl:
   
  -    $ cd mod_perl-1.XX
  +    $ cd mod_perl-1.11
       $ perl Makefile.PL
       ReadLine support enabled
       Configure mod_perl with ../apache-1.3/src ? [y] y
  @@ -222,7 +221,7 @@
     This automatically builds and installs Apache 1.3 with mod_perl.  After
     additionally installing the Perl side of mod_perl via
   
  -    $ cd ../mod_perl-1.XX
  +    $ cd ../mod_perl-1.11
       $ perl Makefile.PL NO_HTTPD=1
       $ make all install
   
  
  
  
  1.25      +31 -25    apache-1.3/INSTALL
  
  Index: INSTALL
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /export/home/cvs/apache-1.3/INSTALL,v
  retrieving revision 1.24
  retrieving revision 1.25
  diff -u -r1.24 -r1.25
  --- INSTALL	1998/05/06 15:17:56	1.24
  +++ INSTALL	1998/05/06 15:44:26	1.25
  @@ -9,16 +9,15 @@
     Introduction
     ============
   
  -  Like all good things, there are two ways to configure, compile, and
  -  install Apache.  You can go for the 3-minute installation process
  -  using the APACI process described below; or, you can opt for the same
  -  mechanism used in previous versions of Apache, as described in the
  -  file 'src/INSTALL'.  Each mechanism has its benefits and drawbacks -
  -  APACI is newer and a little more raw, but it gets you up and running
  -  the least amount of time, whereas the "Configuration.tmpl" mechanism
  -  may be more familiar and give you some more flexibility to the power
  -  user.  We'd be very interested in your comments and feedback regarding
  -  each approach.
  +  Like all good things, there are two ways to configure, compile, and install
  +  Apache.  You can go for the 3-minute installation process using the APACI
  +  process described below; or, you can opt for the same mechanism used in
  +  previous versions of Apache, as described in the file 'src/INSTALL'.  Each
  +  mechanism has its benefits and drawbacks - APACI is newer and a little more
  +  raw, but it gets you up and running the least amount of time, whereas the
  +  "Configuration.tmpl" mechanism may be more familiar and give you some more
  +  flexibility to the power user.  We'd be very interested in your comments and
  +  feedback regarding each approach.
   
   
     Installing the Apache 1.3 HTTP server with APACI
  @@ -47,22 +46,23 @@
        o  ANSI-C Compiler: 
   
           Make sure you have an ANSI-C compiler installed. The GNU C compiler
  -        (GCC) from the Free Software Foundation (FSF) is recommended.  If you
  -        don't have GCC then at least make sure your vendors compiler is ANSI
  -        compliant. You can find the homepage of GNU at
  -        http://www.gnu.ai.mit.edu/ and the GCC distribution under
  +        (GCC) from the Free Software Foundation (FSF) is recommended (version
  +        2.7.2 is fine). If you don't have GCC then at least make sure your
  +        vendors compiler is ANSI compliant. You can find the homepage of GNU
  +        at http://www.gnu.ai.mit.edu/ and the GCC distribution under
           http://www.gnu.ai.mit.edu/order/ftp.html .
   
        o  Perl 5 Interpreter [OPTIONAL]:
   
           For some of the support scripts like `apxs' or `dbmmanage' (which are
  -        written in Perl) the Perl 5 interpreter is required. If no such
  -        interpreter is found by APACI's `configure' script this is no harm.
  -        Of course, you still can build and install Apache 1.3. Only those
  -        support scripts cannot be used. If you have multiple Perl interpreters
  -        installed (perhaps a Perl 4 from the vendor and a Perl 5 from your
  -        own), then it is recommended to use the --with-perl option (see below)
  -        to make sure the correct one is selected by APACI.
  +        written in Perl) the Perl 5 interpreter is required (versions 5.003
  +        and 5.004 are fine). If no such interpreter is found by APACI's
  +        `configure' script this is no harm.  Of course, you still can build
  +        and install Apache 1.3. Only those support scripts cannot be used. If
  +        you have multiple Perl interpreters installed (perhaps a Perl 4 from
  +        the vendor and a Perl 5 from your own), then it is recommended to use
  +        the --with-perl option (see below) to make sure the correct one is
  +        selected by APACI.
   
        o  Dynamic Shared Object (DSO) support [OPTIONAL]:
   
  @@ -83,7 +83,7 @@
              - Solaris 
   
           o Entirely unsupported platforms are:
  -           - Ultrix (because no dlopen-style interface)
  +           - Ultrix
   
           If your system is not on these lists but has the dlopen-style
           interface, you either have to provide the appropriate compiler and
  @@ -119,7 +119,7 @@
        with a particular compiler and flags plus the two additional modules
        mod_rewrite and mod_proxy for later loading through the DSO mechanism: 
   
  -     $ CC="pgcc" OPTIM="-O6" \
  +     $ CC="pgcc" OPTIM="-O2" \
          ./configure --prefix=/sw/pkg/apache \
                      --enable-module=rewrite --enable-shared=rewrite \
                      --enable-module=proxy   --enable-shared=proxy
  @@ -244,6 +244,12 @@
                    a --enable-module=so option because the bootstrapping module
                    mod_so is always needed for DSO support.
   
  +         Note 4: When you later want to extend your Apache installation via
  +                 third-party modules through the DSO+APXS mechanism make sure
  +                 that you at least compile with mod_so included, even when no
  +                 distributed modules are build as shared objects. This can be
  +                 achieved by explicitly using --enable-module=so.
  +
        Use the --with-perl=FILE option to select a particular Perl interpreter
        executable to be used with Apache. Per default APACI tries to find it
        automatically. But if multiple Perl instances exist on your system you
  @@ -277,8 +283,8 @@
           $ make 
    
        Please be patient here, this takes approximately 2 minutes to complete
  -     under a Pentium-166/FreeBSD-2.2 system, dependend on the amount of modules
  -     you have enabled. 
  +     under a Pentium-166/FreeBSD-2.2 system, dependend on the amount of
  +     modules you have enabled. 
    
     5. Installing the package
        ----------------------
  
  
  
  1.9       +15 -14    apache-1.3/src/README.DSO
  
  Index: README.DSO
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /export/home/cvs/apache-1.3/src/README.DSO,v
  retrieving revision 1.8
  retrieving revision 1.9
  diff -u -r1.8 -r1.9
  --- README.DSO	1998/05/02 11:15:08	1.8
  +++ README.DSO	1998/05/06 15:44:29	1.9
  @@ -277,22 +277,23 @@
        
        In other words: When a module is compiled as a DSO it automatically
        results in a higher priority than any statically compiled modules. This
  -     can have strange side-effects because of different execution order. As a
  -     consequence the rule of thumb is this: Either compile all modules
  -     statically or all modules as DSO (--enable-shared=max) when you want to
  -     avoid side-effects. And only compile just a subset of modules as DSO when
  -     you are sure the different execution order has no side-effects for your
  -     configuration. BE WARNED!
  +     can have strange side-effects because of different execution order.  To
  +     overcome this problem the Apache installation process automatically
  +     inserts ClearModuleList+AddModule directives into the initial httpd.conf
  +     file which re-create the chained list of modules in the correct order.
  +     So whenever you change the list of loaded modules make sure to also
  +     update this ClearModule+AddModule directives accordingly.
   
      - Because DSO modules cannot be linked against other DSO-based libraries
  -     (ld -lfoo) you cannot use the DSO mechanism for all types of modules. Or
  -     in other words, modules compiled as DSO files are restricted to only use
  -     symbols from the Apache core, from the C library (libc) and all other
  -     dynamic or static libraries used by the Apache core, or from static
  -     library archives (libfoo.a) containing position independend code. The
  -     only chance to use other code is to either make sure the Apache core
  -     itself already contains a reference to it or loading the code yourself
  -     via dlopen().
  +     (ld -lfoo) on all platforms (for instance a.out-based platforms usually
  +     don't provide this functionality while ELF-based platforms do) you cannot
  +     use the DSO mechanism for all types of modules. Or in other words,
  +     modules compiled as DSO files are restricted to only use symbols from the
  +     Apache core, from the C library (libc) and all other dynamic or static
  +     libraries used by the Apache core, or from static library archives
  +     (libfoo.a) containing position independend code. The only chance to use
  +     other code is to either make sure the Apache core itself already contains
  +     a reference to it or loading the code yourself via dlopen().
   
      - Under some platforms (many SVR4 systems) there is no way to force the
        linker to export all global symbols for use in DSO's when linking the
  
  
  

Mime
View raw message