httpd-cvs mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From Roy Fielding <field...@hyperreal.org>
Subject cvs commit: apachen/src CHANGES
Date Tue, 30 Sep 1997 21:48:41 GMT
fielding    97/09/30 14:48:40

  Modified:    src      CHANGES
  Log:
  Improve the note about new unbuffered CGI
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.453     +16 -12    apachen/src/CHANGES
  
  Index: CHANGES
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /export/home/cvs/apachen/src/CHANGES,v
  retrieving revision 1.452
  retrieving revision 1.453
  diff -u -r1.452 -r1.453
  --- CHANGES	1997/09/30 21:02:10	1.452
  +++ CHANGES	1997/09/30 21:48:37	1.453
  @@ -447,18 +447,22 @@
        setting.  The define MAX_SPAWN_RATE can be used to raise/lower
        the maximum.  [Dean Gaudet]
   
  -  *) "nph-" CGIs were not compatible with HTTP/1.1 or SSL support because
  -     they were passed a socket that connected directly to the client.
  -     As such they would have to implement the transport level details
  -     such as encryption or chunking in order to work properly.
  -     This isn't part of the CGI spec so CGIs generally don't do this.
  -     The most common use of nph- CGIs is when the programmer wants an
  -     unbuffered connection to the client; regular CGIs have always been
  -     fully buffered.  Apache now provides an unbuffered connection to
  -     all CGIs.  Given that most CGIs are written in a language that by
  -     default does buffering (i.e. perl) this shouldn't have a detrimental
  -     effect on performance.  The programmer can still use nph- CGIs,
  -     and they're still responsible for sending valid HTTP/1.1 responses.
  +  *) Apache now provides an effectively unbuffered connection for
  +     CGI scripts.  This means that data will be sent to the client
  +     as soon as the CGI pauses or stops output; previously, Apache would
  +     buffer the output up to a fixed buffer size before sending, which
  +     could result in the user viewing an empty page until the CGI finished
  +     or output a complete buffer.  It is no longer necessary to use an
  +     "nph-" CGI to get unbuffered output.  Given that most CGIs are written
  +     in a language that by default does buffering (e.g. perl) this
  +     shouldn't have a detrimental effect on performance.
  +
  +     "nph-" CGIs, which formerly provided a direct socket to the client
  +     without any server post-processing, were not fully compatible with
  +     HTTP/1.1 or SSL support.  As such they would have had to implement
  +     the transport details, such as encryption or chunking, in order
  +     to work properly in certain situations.  Now, the only difference
  +     between nph and non-nph scripts is "non-parsed headers".
        [Dean Gaudet, Sameer Parekh, Roy Fielding]
   
     *) If a BUFF is switched from buffered to unbuffered reading the first
  
  
  

Mime
View raw message