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From Rodent of Unusual Size <c...@hyperreal.com>
Subject cvs commit: apache/htdocs/manual/misc FAQ.html
Date Wed, 28 May 1997 19:02:15 GMT
coar        97/05/28 12:02:15

  Modified:    htdocs/manual/misc  FAQ.html
  Log:
  	Corrected FAQ about Java to reflect the latest edition of
  	reality as we know it.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.60      +21 -13    apache/htdocs/manual/misc/FAQ.html
  
  Index: FAQ.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /export/home/cvs/apache/htdocs/manual/misc/FAQ.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.59
  retrieving revision 1.60
  diff -C3 -r1.59 -r1.60
  *** FAQ.html	1997/05/19 21:10:22	1.59
  --- FAQ.html	1997/05/28 19:02:13	1.60
  ***************
  *** 8,14 ****
      <!--#include virtual="header.html" -->
      <H1>Apache Server Frequently Asked Questions</H1>
      <P>
  !   $Revision: 1.59 $ ($Date: 1997/05/19 21:10:22 $)
      </P>
      <P>
      The latest version of this FAQ is always available from the main
  --- 8,14 ----
      <!--#include virtual="header.html" -->
      <H1>Apache Server Frequently Asked Questions</H1>
      <P>
  !   $Revision: 1.60 $ ($Date: 1997/05/28 19:02:13 $)
      </P>
      <P>
      The latest version of this FAQ is always available from the main
  ***************
  *** 174,182 ****
       <LI><A HREF="#addlog">How do I add browsers and referrers to my
        logs?</A>
       </LI>
  -    <LI><A HREF="#jdk1.x">Why do Java applets and applications not work
  -     with documents on my Apache server?</A>
  -    </LI>
      </OL>
     </LI>
    </UL>
  --- 174,179 ----
  ***************
  *** 953,977 ****
      As of version 1.2, Apache is an HTTP/1.1 (HyperText Transfer Protocol
      version 1.1) server.  This fact is reflected in the protocol version
      that's included in the response headers sent to a client when
  !   processing a request.  Unfortunately, the URL methods (URLConnection
  !   and friends) in the Java Development Kit (JDK) versions 1.0.2 through
  !   1.1.1 expect to see the version string &quot;HTTP/1.0&quot; and do not
  !   correctly interpret the &quot;HTTP/1.1&quot; value Apache is sending
  !   (this part of the response is a declaration of what the server can do
  !   rather than a declaration of the dialect of the response).  The result
      is that the JDK methods do not correctly parse the headers, and
      include them with the document content by mistake.
      </P>
      <P>
  !   This is definitely a bug in the JDK, but it's unclear when (or
  !   whether) it will be fixed.  In the meantime, a workaround is to tell
      Apache to &quot;fake&quot; an HTTP/1.0 response to requests that come
      from the JDK methods; this can be done by including a line such as the
      following in your server configuration files:
      </P>
      <P>
      <DL>
  !    <DD><CODE>BrowserMatch HotJava/1.0 force-response-1.0</CODE>
       </DD>
      </DL>
      </P>
  --- 950,985 ----
      As of version 1.2, Apache is an HTTP/1.1 (HyperText Transfer Protocol
      version 1.1) server.  This fact is reflected in the protocol version
      that's included in the response headers sent to a client when
  !   processing a request.  Unfortunately, low-level Web access classes
  !   included in the Java Development Kit (JDK) version 1.0.2 expect to see
  !   the version string &quot;HTTP/1.0&quot; and do not correctly interpret
  !   the &quot;HTTP/1.1&quot; value Apache is sending (this part of the
  !   response is a declaration of what the server can do rather than a
  !   declaration of the dialect of the response).  The result
      is that the JDK methods do not correctly parse the headers, and
      include them with the document content by mistake.
      </P>
      <P>
  !   This is definitely a bug in the JDK 1.0.2 foundation classes from Sun,
  !   and it has been fixed in version 1.1.  However, the classes in
  !   question are part of the virtual machine environment, which means
  !   they're part of the Web browser (if Java-enabled) or the Java
  !   environment on the client system - so even if you develop
  !   <EM>your</EM> classes with a recent JDK, the eventual users might
  !   encounter the problem.
  !   The classes involved are replaceable by vendors implementing the
  !   Java virtual machine environment, and so even those that are based
  !   upon the 1.0.2 version may not have this problem.
  !   </P>
  !   <P>
  !   In the meantime, a workaround is to tell
      Apache to &quot;fake&quot; an HTTP/1.0 response to requests that come
      from the JDK methods; this can be done by including a line such as the
      following in your server configuration files:
      </P>
      <P>
      <DL>
  !    <DD><CODE>BrowserMatch Java/1.0 force-response-1.0</CODE>
       </DD>
      </DL>
      </P>
  
  
  

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