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From Stefano Mazzocchi <stef...@apache.org>
Subject Re: I welcome J2SE 6's faster-splash.... re: Java speed-up
Date Thu, 16 Feb 2006 14:36:16 GMT
Fernando Cassia wrote:
> On 2/16/06, Stefano Mazzocchi <stefano@apache.org> wrote:
>>
>> which implements a very interesting trick to speed up java startup
>> performance: save the hotspot information in a repository (at JVM shut
>> down) so that the JIT doesn't have to wait when it starts until it knows
>> what is a hotspot to start compiling it. the performance improvements
>> are not likely to change the perception that java is awefully slow to
>> start up on the desktop, but it's a clever idea.
>>
>> In the meanwhile, Sun's attempt to solve the same problem in JSE6 is this=
> :
>> http://java.sun.com/developer/JDCTechTips/2005/tt1115.html#1
>>
>> No comment.
> 
> You try to sound clever by making that statement, but imho, despite any
> other speed-up work who might be implemented, Sun's solution
> is very important, and something that should have been implemented a long,
> long time ago. I welcome their implementation, even if late.
> 
> Get this: Splash screens sever an important purpose: they're a visual cue to
> tell the user that the program is loading (even if it takes a long time).
> 
> It's all about PERCEPTION. Java aps are PERCEIVED as slower because
> the computer
> appears to "freeze" until the program's UI is finally showed on the screen
> (after ALL classes -and even more if it uses Swing- needed to run are
> loaded- By then, the user is no longer interested in seeing a splash screen,
> he's already wondering why it took so long....
> 
> See,  most Flash content on the web takes an AWFUL LOT of time to download,
> yet if you ask users, they'll tell you that Flash "loads faster" than java.
> The difference? Flash applets can show a message RIGHT AWAY and often
> display a progress dialog as the rest of the flash cr*p is downloading,
> telling the user what is going on. In contrast, java applets (and desktop
> applications as well) "freeze" the user experience until the applet (or
> desktop app) has loaded.

My point was that it is *trivial* to patch the C code that implements 
the java JVM loader to add something like that.

On an apple computer, since practically 5 years ago, you can double 
click on a jar file and the icon will start bouncing right away on your 
dock.

My point is: I don't think this is silly, it's a very useful feature, 
but it's *lame* that it took them almost 10 years to realize they needed 
it!

But look at the bright side: there are probably many other really simple 
yet useful things that can be done to make java more useful on the 
desktop and this will be a marketing win for alternative JVMs.

We need to find the tab-browsing-equivalent of a JVM ;-)

-- 
Stefano.


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