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From Bertrand Dechoux <decho...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Replace a block with a new one
Date Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:01:03 GMT
So you know that a block is corrupted thanks to an external process which
in this case is checking the parity blocks. If a block is corrupted but
hasn't been detected by HDFS, you could delete the block from the local
filesystem (it's only a file) then HDFS will replicate the good remaining
replica of this block.

For performance reason (and that's what you want to do?), you might be able
to fix the corruption without needing to retrieve the good replica. It
might be possible by working directly with the local system by replacing
the corrupted block by the corrected block (which again are files). On
issue is that the corrected block might be different than the good replica.
If HDFS is able to tell (with CRC) it might be good else you will end up
with two different good replicas for the same block and that will not be
pretty...

If the result is to be open source, you might want to check with Facebook
about their implementation and track the process within Apache JIRA. You
could gain additional feedbacks. One downside of HDFS RAID is that the less
replicas there is, the less read of the data for processing will be
'efficient/fast'. Reducing the number of replicas also diminishes the
number of supported node failures. I wouldn't say it's an easy ride.

Bertrand Dechoux


On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 1:29 PM, Zesheng Wu <wuzesheng86@gmail.com> wrote:

> We want to implement a RAID on top of HDFS, something like facebook
> implemented as described in:
> https://code.facebook.com/posts/536638663113101/saving-capacity-with-hdfs-raid/
>
>
> 2014-07-21 17:19 GMT+08:00 Bertrand Dechoux <dechouxb@gmail.com>:
>
> You want to implement a RAID on top of HDFS or use HDFS on top of RAID? I
>> am not sure I understand any of these use cases. HDFS handles for you
>> replication and error detection. Fine tuning the cluster wouldn't be the
>> easier solution?
>>
>> Bertrand Dechoux
>>
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 7:25 AM, Zesheng Wu <wuzesheng86@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks for reply, Arpit.
>>> Yes, we need to do this regularly. The original requirement of this is
>>> that we want to do RAID(which is based reed-solomon erasure codes) on our
>>> HDFS cluster. When a block is corrupted or missing, the downgrade read
>>> needs quick recovery of the block. We are considering how to recovery the
>>> corrupted/missing block quickly.
>>>
>>>
>>> 2014-07-19 5:18 GMT+08:00 Arpit Agarwal <aagarwal@hortonworks.com>:
>>>
>>>> IMHO this is a spectacularly bad idea. Is it a one off event? Why not
>>>> just take the perf hit and recreate the file?
>>>>
>>>> If you need to do this regularly you should consider a mutable file
>>>> store like HBase. If you start modifying blocks from under HDFS you open
up
>>>> all sorts of consistency issues.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 2:10 PM, Shumin Guo <gsmsteve@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> That will break the consistency of the file system, but it doesn't
>>>>> hurt to try.
>>>>>  On Jul 17, 2014 8:48 PM, "Zesheng Wu" <wuzesheng86@gmail.com>
wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> How about write a new block with new checksum file, and replace the
>>>>>> old block file and checksum file both?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 2014-07-17 19:34 GMT+08:00 Wellington Chevreuil <
>>>>>> wellington.chevreuil@gmail.com>:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> there's no way to do that, as HDFS does not provide file updates
>>>>>>> features. You'll need to write a new file with the changes.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Notice that even if you manage to find the physical block replica
>>>>>>> files on the disk, corresponding to the part of the file you
want to
>>>>>>> change, you can't simply update it manually, as this would give
a different
>>>>>>> checksum, making HDFS mark such blocks as corrupt.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>> Wellington.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 17 Jul 2014, at 10:50, Zesheng Wu <wuzesheng86@gmail.com>
wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> > Hi guys,
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > I recently encounter a scenario which needs to replace an
exist
>>>>>>> block with a newly written block
>>>>>>> > The most straightforward way to finish may be like this:
>>>>>>> > Suppose the original file is A, and we write a new file
B which is
>>>>>>> composed by the new data blocks, then we merge A and B to C which
is the
>>>>>>> file we wanted
>>>>>>> > The obvious shortcoming of this method is wasting of network
>>>>>>> bandwidth
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > I'm wondering whether there is a way to replace the old
block by
>>>>>>> the new block directly.
>>>>>>> > Any thoughts?
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > --
>>>>>>> > Best Wishes!
>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>> > Yours, Zesheng
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Best Wishes!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Yours, Zesheng
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE
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>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Best Wishes!
>>>
>>> Yours, Zesheng
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Best Wishes!
>
> Yours, Zesheng
>

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