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From Kevan Miller <kevan.mil...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: git, hg or bzr for G development?
Date Tue, 27 Jan 2009 18:47:27 GMT

On Jan 27, 2009, at 12:47 PM, Jason Dillon wrote:

> On Jan 28, 2009, at 12:07 AM, Kevan Miller wrote:
>>> What does git have that svn doesn't which makes you so interested in
>>> the subject?
>>
>> IIUC, the major advantages of GIT are:
>>
>> * offline commits - you can commit changes, even if online.
>> * cheap branching - this would make it much simpler for individuals  
>> to create private local branches and work on implementing a  
>> particular feature, without interfering with other development they  
>> might be working on in the same code branch.
>> * fast merging - given the cheap branching, you need to do a lot of  
>> merging, which GIT is supposed to do very well
>>
>> GIT would not be a replacement of SVN. The GIT repositories are  
>> actually mirroring svn. GIT would just be a new tool for accessing  
>> our code.
>>
>> There are some usages of GIT that would not fit well into an Apache  
>> project. For instance, I would not want to see project members  
>> using GIT as a private means of sharing code updates. Ultimately,  
>> code needs to get into our svn repo -- that's where we should be  
>> sharing code.
>
> Why do you have a problem with users sharing code via their own GIT  
> repos?  I guess I can kinda see your concern, but I'd expect folks  
> with significant changes to the codebase to want to share their GIT  
> repos with others *before* pushing those changes back into SVN.

Right. So, I wouldn't want a few people to decide to implement some  
new function, start sharing code (privately amongst themselves), and  
then dump it into svn. IIUC, GIT makes this pretty easy to do.  
Currently, this sort of activity would happen in an svn sandbox or via  
patches posted to a Jira. In either case the collaboration and work  
should be public. I want to make sure we maintain this.

Until *everyone* is using GIT and we have community policies governing  
its usage, svn and our mailing lists are where we need to be  
collaborating.

--kevan

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