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From "Aaron Mulder" <ammul...@alumni.princeton.edu>
Subject Re: MDB Question
Date Sun, 11 Jun 2006 14:02:41 GMT
>    <sys:reference name="IS THIS RELATED TO THE GBEAN INFO?">

Yes, you need to add a reference to your GBeanInfo with this name, and
then either add a constructor argument or a setter on the GBean class.

David pointed to configs/system-database/src/plan/plan.xml, which has this:

<gbean name="NonTransactionalThreadPooledTimer"
class="org.apache.geronimo.timer.jdbc.JDBCStoreThreadPooledNonTransactionalTimer">
    ...
    <reference name="ManagedConnectionFactoryWrapper"><name>SystemDatasource
</name></reference>

Now if you look in the class
JDBCStoreThreadPooledNonTransactionalTimer, the GBean info contains:

infoFactory.addReference("ManagedConnectionFactoryWrapper",
ConnectionFactorySource.class,
NameFactory.JCA_MANAGED_CONNECTION_FACTORY);

Then

infoFactory.setConstructor(new String[]{"ManagedConnectionFactoryWrapper", ...

And if you look in the constructor

public JDBCStoreThreadPooledNonTransactionalTimer(ConnectionFactorySource
managedConnectionFactoryWrapper, ...

So this is how the reference works -- you add it to your GBeanInfo
with a name and class, then either just add a setter method, or list
it by name as a constructor argument in the GBean info and add the
actual constructor arg.  Either the setter type or constructor arg
type should match the class argument to the GBeanInfo addReference.
The name of the reference in the plan should match the name of the
reference in the GBeanInfo.  The connection factory class is
ConnectionFactorySource, and I expect the destination class to use
would be AdminObjectSource.

>       <sys:name>WHAT IS THIS?</sys:name>

This should match the connectiondefinition-instance/name for the
connection factory, and I think the
adminobject-instance/message-destination-name for the admin object.

Thanks,
    Aaron

On 6/11/06, Neal Sanche <neal@nsdev.org> wrote:
> Thanks David,
>
> I've looked for the examples you mention, and probably because it's
> late, but I'm not getting it. Let's see if I can follow it at least a
> little. I can't use JNDI, that much is clear. The only thing in the
> GBean's JNDI is the JMXConnector object.
>
> So, you're saying that I can use constructor dependency injection
> instead. So, in my <sys:gbean>, I would have to add a couple of
> <sys:reference> tags, the question is what do I use for the 'name'
> attribute and the <sys:name> child element of those references?
>
> Then, after I've done that, and set up the references in my GBean Info,
> I can set up a constructor that takes those parameters. I've been
> looking at the JDBCStoreThreadPooledNonTransactionalTimer class, which
> shows exactly how to do that. That makes sense.
>
> I guess all I need is direction on what my <sys:gbean> should look like?
>
>  <sys:gbean class="org.acme.TimerGBean" name="TimerGBean">
>    <sys:attribute name="period">5000</sys:attribute>
>    <sys:reference name="IS THIS RELATED TO THE GBEAN INFO?">
>       <sys:name>WHAT IS THIS?</sys:name>
>    </sys:reference>
>  </sys:gbean>
>
> If you could tell me how to figure out the two names, I'll try it and
> see if I get references to my queue and connection factories.
>
> Thanks!
>
> -Neal
>
> David Jencks wrote:
> > Hi Neal,
> >
> > This isn't going to work using jndi.  We only supply the spec-required
> > local jndi java:comp context to j2ee components, and there is no
> > global jndi context.  Therefore a gbean with a thread is not going to
> > have a usable jndi context.
> >
> > What you can do instead is use gbean references and constructor
> > dependency injection.  This is a bit strange, because the gbeans
> > involved are not queues or connection factories but holders for them,
> > and to get the queue or connection factory you have to call a
> > $getResource method on them.
> >
> > For instance, for the connection factory you could include in your
> > gbean into and constuctor args a reference to a
> > ManagedConnectionFactoryWrapper, and get the connection factory by
> >
> >   ConnectionFactory connectionFactory = (ConnectionFactory)
> > mcfWrapper.$getResource();
> >
> > in your constructor: similarly
> >   Queue queue = (Queue) adminObjectWrapper.$getResource();
> >
> > If you look in the system-database plan and the timer module you can
> > see an example of this, the timer gbean has a reference to a
> > MCFWrapper gbean and gets the datasource from it.  Activemq journal
> > has a similar reference to get a jdbc datasource for long-term
> > persistence.
> >
> > Hope this helps,
> > david jencks
> >
> >
> > On Jun 10, 2006, at 10:20 PM, Neal Sanche wrote:
> >
> >> Hi All,
> >>
> >> I am doing some research for a Geronimo 1.1 tutorial I'm putting
> >> together. I'm writing a little reminder application that uses an MDB
> >> that is periodically sent a JMS message to wake it up to perform a
> >> little database lookup and send out a bunch of reminder email
> >> messages. That's the theory anyway.
> >>
> >> I have managed to get my MDB to deploy after creating a JMS Resource
> >> Adaptor through the Admin console, and then setting up the dependency
> >> and MessageDriven section in my open-ejb.xml deployment plan, that
> >> looks like the following:
> >>
> >> <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
> >> <openejb-jar xmlns="http://www.openejb.org/xml/ns/openejb-jar-2.1"
> >> xmlns:nam="http://geronimo.apache.org/xml/ns/naming-1.1"
> >>    xmlns:pkgen="http://www.openejb.org/xml/ns/pkgen-2.0"
> >> xmlns:sec="http://geronimo.apache.org/xml/ns/security-1.1"
> >>    xmlns:sys="http://geronimo.apache.org/xml/ns/deployment-1.1">
> >>  <sys:environment>
> >>    <sys:moduleId>
> >>      <sys:groupId>default</sys:groupId>
> >>      <sys:artifactId>ReminderBackend</sys:artifactId>
> >>      <sys:version>1.0</sys:version>
> >>      <sys:type>car</sys:type>
> >>    </sys:moduleId>
> >>    <sys:dependencies>
> >>      <sys:dependency>
> >>        <sys:groupId>console.jms</sys:groupId>
> >>        <sys:artifactId>ReminderMessageAdaptor</sys:artifactId>
> >>        <sys:version>1.0</sys:version>
> >>        <sys:type>rar</sys:type>
> >>      </sys:dependency>
> >>    </sys:dependencies>
> >>  </sys:environment>
> >>  <enterprise-beans>
> >>    <message-driven>
> >>      <ejb-name>TimerTick</ejb-name>
> >>      <nam:resource-adapter>
> >>        <nam:resource-link>ReminderMessageAdaptor</nam:resource-link>
> >>      </nam:resource-adapter>
> >>      <activation-config>
> >>        <activation-config-property>
> >>
> >> <activation-config-property-name>destination</activation-config-property-name>
> >>
> >>
> >> <activation-config-property-value>TimerTickQueue</activation-config-property-value>
> >>
> >>        </activation-config-property>
> >>        <activation-config-property>
> >>
> >> <activation-config-property-name>destinationType</activation-config-property-name>
> >>
> >>
> >> <activation-config-property-value>javax.jms.Queue</activation-config-property-value>
> >>
> >>        </activation-config-property>
> >>      </activation-config>
> >>    </message-driven>
> >>  </enterprise-beans>
> >>
> >> </openejb-jar>
> >>
> >>
> >> Now, that's all good. It deploys without any warnings. Now, I want to
> >> send a message to the queue. So, I thought to myself, 'Self, I'll
> >> write a GBean to start a thread to send a TextMessage to the queue
> >> periodically.' So I wrote one, and added the following to my
> >> deployment descriptor:
> >>
> >>  <sys:gbean class="org.acme.TimerGBean" name="TimerGBean">
> >>    <sys:attribute name="period">5000</sys:attribute>
> >>  </sys:gbean>
> >>
> >> I am getting called back for the start() and stop() lifecycle
> >> methods, and so I wrote my thread to be interruptable, and that's all
> >> working. My thread wakes up and calls the following method (ignore
> >> the resource issues here, I haven't written my finally block yet):
> >>
> >>
> >>    private void SendTickMessage() {
> >>        System.err.println("Tick");
> >>              try {
> >>            Queue queue = TimerTickUtil.getQueue();
> >>            System.err.println(queue.getQueueName());
> >>            QueueConnection conn = TimerTickUtil.getQueueConnection();
> >>            Session session =
> >> conn.createSession(false,Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE);
> >>            TextMessage msg = session.createTextMessage("TICK");
> >>            MessageProducer producer = session.createProducer(queue);
> >>            producer.send(msg);
> >>        } catch (Exception ex) {
> >>            ex.printStackTrace();
> >>            try {
> >>                InitialContext ctx = new InitialContext();
> >>                              NamingEnumeration<NameClassPair> en =
> >> ctx.list("");
> >>                while(en.hasMore()) {
> >>                    NameClassPair pair = en.next();
> >>                    System.err.println(pair.getName() + " -> "+
> >> pair.getClassName());
> >>                }
> >>            } catch (Exception ex2) {
> >>                ex2.printStackTrace();
> >>            }
> >>        }
> >>    }
> >>
> >> Now, the problem is that TimerTickUtil.getQueue() is trying to do a
> >> JNDI lookup for the queue, but I have absolutely no idea what form
> >> that JNDI name will take? I ran JConsole to get some idea of the JNDI
> >> namespace, but that was no good, and hence the silly code in the
> >> exception handler that tries to list the entire InitialContext list.
> >> But that's not giving me much to go on either.
> >>
> >> Can anyone tell me what the JNDI name of my queue will be from the
> >> above information? Is there a sample MDB app in the source tree that
> >> shows how this is done?
> >>
> >> I'll keep hammering at it and see if I can figure it out.
> >>
> >> -Neal
>
>

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