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From rgard...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r201617 [2/4] - in /forrest/site/pluginDocs/plugins_0_70/org.apache.forrest.plugin.input.feeder: ./ images/ samples/ samples/feeder/ skin/ skin/css/ skin/images/ skin/scripts/ skin/translations/
Date Fri, 24 Jun 2005 13:27:18 GMT
Added: forrest/site/pluginDocs/plugins_0_70/org.apache.forrest.plugin.input.feeder/samples/feeder/aggregateDescriptor.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/forrest/site/pluginDocs/plugins_0_70/org.apache.forrest.plugin.input.feeder/samples/feeder/aggregateDescriptor.xml?rev=201617&view=auto
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--- forrest/site/pluginDocs/plugins_0_70/org.apache.forrest.plugin.input.feeder/samples/feeder/aggregateDescriptor.xml (added)
+++ forrest/site/pluginDocs/plugins_0_70/org.apache.forrest.plugin.input.feeder/samples/feeder/aggregateDescriptor.xml Fri Jun 24 06:27:14 2005
@@ -0,0 +1,614 @@
+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?><document><header><title>Planet Apache</title></header><body><section><title>Planet Apache</title><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: Itinerary for the next month</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div>
+<p>For the curious, here are my travels for the next month.</p>
+
+<ul>
+<li>June 27 -july 1: Chicago, USA, <a href="http://www.ggf.org/ggf_events_next.htm">GGF14</a> I will be
+demoing fancy things there at the 0730 session on thursday.</li>
+
+<li>July 11-July 15, Orlando, FLA, USA. <a href="http://conferences.computer.org/icws/2005/">IEE International
+Conference on Web Services</a> , talking about Alpine. What, am I
+only back for a week? That is going to kill me...I havent started
+those slides yet.</li>
+
+<li>July 18-22, <a href="http://apachecon.com/">ApacheCon
+Europe</a>, Stuttgard.de, Covering Ant1.7. This is the one I am
+really looking forward to.<br />
+ <a href="http://apachecon.com/"><img src="http://apache.org/images/ac2005eu_135x50.gif" /></a></li>
+</ul>
+
+<p>I will be home at weekends, but sleeping, and then there is the
+book to work on.Overall, a busy month.</p>
+</div></p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: Savas goes to SEA</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div><p>
+<a href="http://savas.parastatidis.name/2005/06/23/8db94646-5ffd-4ce2-803e-3295ed91ae0f.aspx"> Congratulations savas</a>; I hope you have fun; the skiing is much better near Redmond than Northumbria, and it makes the PNW rain bearable.
+</p>
+<p>
+I am looking forward to watching Savas' antics at GGF14 next week; instead of being the dissenter on the fringe, he can now disagree backed the authority of his future employer. I presume he'll be at the somewhat controverial OGSA-MUWS-BOF on tuesday, where he can hand off the role of "OGSA-Savas", that is, the person who points out flaws in the story. I don't want the role BTW; I am having enough fun poking holes in JAXRPC. Assuming Jim W. won't be attending, maybe Marty Humphrey or one of his students will have to become the next Savas...
+</p>
+<p>
+ps; judging by the thunderstoms this am, Glastonbury is going to be wet. I am so glad that I am not going to be on the same plane as Savas. For the sake of those passengers, I hereby extend to Savas P. the offer of a shower (or at least a hosing down in the garden), if he stops by my house in Bristol on monday morning, en-route to LHR. 
+</p>
+
+</div></p><p class="itemTitle">Rich Bowen: Wooga</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>After listening to one too many debates on the relative merits of having, or <a href="http://no-www.org/">not having</a> the &#8220;www&#8221; prefix to all hostnames, I&#8217;ve decided that, henceforth, I will refer to my website as <a href="http://wooga.drbacchus.com/journal/">wooga.drbacchus.com</a>. You are encouraged to use this new nomenclature, and update all of your bookmarks accordingly. Soon, I&#8217;ll start using mod_rewrite to force this usage.</p>
+	<p>Thank you for your attention.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Rich Bowen: Response to comments (Re: word processors and publishing)</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>This started as a response to comments to <a href="http://drbacchus.com/wordpress/?p=982">an earlier posting</a>, but grew rather too long to be just a comment.</p>
+	<p>No. I can&#8217;t use Pages. It must be MS Word. It&#8217;s not about exporting to MS Word format. That&#8217;s not sufficient. You have to be able to use all of the MS Word templating and revision tracking stuff in order to work with most of these publishers. Their process is completely embedded in Word, and attempting to use a different word processor makes the process break. I&#8217;ve tried everything from Pages to OO.o to LaTeX and vim, and there are always small problems that break the process. (Yes, one kind publisher permitted me to write in LaTeX, and afterwards swore that they would never, ever, ever let another writer use LaTeX.)</p>
+	<p>Anyways, in defence of APress, I should mention that my frustration and ranting was almost immediately answered by a response from my editor telling me how to get around the problem that I was having, thus showing that I really should have just sent her a note when it started happening, rather than wasting 2 hours on it.</p>
+	<p>Regarding the Docbook comments &#8212; we wrote Apache Cookbook in Docbook, and that went ok until it got to the editing process, and they converted it to Word docs, and then sent us back revisions in Word, making it completely impossible to produce any kind of intelligible diff. Once again, the process lives in Word.</p>
+	<p>What strikes me as ironic is that all of my books have been about Open Source software, And one of these publishers has made their entire fortune on F/L/OSS.</p>
+	<p>At OSCon 2004, Tim O&#8217;Reilly asked me what part of working with O&#8217;Reilly had been the most negative aspect. I unhesitatingly answered that it was being forced to work with MS Word. He chuckled and said that he&#8217;d see what he could do about it. But I doubt that there&#8217;s much that can be done, because of how closely tied the entire editorial process is to particular features of Word - features that are sufficiently different in other software to make it incompatible with the process.</p>
+	<p>This is, of course, a topic that comes up with regularity whenever tech authors are complaining about their writing experiences. The tools are there to make the editor&#8217;s job easy, not the writer&#8217;s. Ideally, I&#8217;d like to just write plain text, with minimal markup or comments saying &#8220;this is example code&#8221; or &#8220;put wooga.gif here&#8221;, and then have a layout person do the actual page layout. Of course, that introduces more expense into the process, and tech books are already absurdly expensive.</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Brett Porter: Maven 2.0 Alpha 3 Released</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>The Apache Maven team are proud to announce the third alpha release of Maven 2.0.</p>
+
+<p>Download it from <a href="http://maven.apache.org/maven2/download.html">http://maven.apache.org/maven2/download.html</a></p>
+
+<p>This release includes <a href="http://jira.codehaus.org/secure/ReleaseNote.jspa?projectId=10500&styleName=Html&version=11021">83 bug fixes and enhancements</a> since the previous release on 13 May.</p>
+
+<p>Maven 2.0 is a rewrite of the popular Maven application to achieve a number of goals, and to provide a stable basis to take it into the future. While it can be considered quite stable, and future versions are now expected to retain a high amount of backwards compatibility, this is still a technology preview, and not yet complete or considered ready for a production environment.</p>
+
+<p>The main new features in this release are:<br />
+<ul><br />
+<li>Improved dependency management</li><br />
+<li>Build profiles for environment specific settings and dependencies</li><br />
+<li>Finalised <a>build lifecycle</a></li><br />
+<li>Proper handling of derived dependency type such as sources, javadocs and ejb clients</li><br />
+<li>Beanshell plugin support</li><br />
+<li>Improved reporting support, including internationalisation.</li><br />
+<li>Improvements to the Ant tasks</li><br />
+<li>Better plugin management, with the ability to select specific versions for use</li><br />
+<li>Various plugin improvements</li><br />
+</ul></p>
+
+<p>This release is very near to being feature complete, and the next release will be a feature complete beta-1.</p>
+
+<p>We hope you enjoy using Maven! If you have any questions, please consult:</p>
+
+<p>    * the web site: <a href="http://maven.apache.org/maven2/">http://maven.apache.org/maven2/</a><br />
+    * the maven-user mailing list: <a>http://maven.apache.org/mail-lists.html</a></p>
+
+<p>For news and information, see:</p>
+
+<p>    * Maven Blogs: <a>http://www.mavenblogs.com/</a></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Nick Lothian: Search Engine Indexing Speed</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Tristan Louis has written a couple of articles on the number of hits for various bloggers in three search engines: Google, MSN and Technorati. See <a href="http://www.tnl.net/blog/entry/Secrets_of_the_A-list_bloggers:_Technorati_vs._Google">http://www.tnl.net/blog/entry/Secrets_of_the_A-list_bloggers:_Technorati_vs._Google</a> and <a href="http://www.tnl.net/blog/entry/Technorati_Yahoo_and_Google_Too">http://www.tnl.net/blog/entry/Technorati_Yahoo_and_Google_Too</a>.</p>
+
+<p>A number of people have pointed out that there are problems with his methodology and the aim of the experiment itself. Tim Bray says it well: <a href="http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2005/06/22/Silly-Search">"Almost all the modern engines do a pretty damn good job of getting you something appropriate and useful in the first handful of results. Who cares about the next million?"</a>, but if you want all the details of what is wrong with this study, see <a href="http://blog.searchenginewatch.com/blog/050622-110917">Danny Sullivan's post</a>.
+
+<p>Anyway, I'm interested in search engine comparisons, but right now I'm more interested in how fast things get in the index than how many million results something returns, so over the last couple of daya I conducted a small experiment.</p>
+
+<p>Firstly, I <a href="http://www.mackmo.com/nick/blog/java/2005/6/22/Agro_the_Aggregator.txt">posted a blog post entitled "Agro the Aggregator"</a> and then about 12 hours later I used my <a href="http://argos.dev.java.net/">Argos search engine library</a> to poll six search engines ever half hour with the query "Agro the Aggregator" for 19 hours. I then counted the results by iterating over them all (ie, the links were manually counted without relying on the "result count" returned by the search engines which can be inaccurate).</p>
+
+<p>Unfortunately I started the experiment too late to catch which engine found a result first, but Blogdigger, Google and Yahoo all had results by the time I started searching.</p>
+
+<p>However, the results do show the following:
+<ul>
+<li>Google finds the most results, although they fluctuate. I could not replicate the way those results dropped back to 2 hits using manual search, so it is possible that this is an artifact of using the Google API. IN the manual search, Google also correctly identifies a number of these 16 posts as being duplicate content (ie, my blog post re-aggregated).</li>
+<li><a href="http://www.blogdigger.com">Blogdigger</a> returned results the quickest out of any of the 3 specialist blog search engines (Blogdigger, Feedster and Technorati). This was despite the fact that Technorati was pinged directly with the blog posting. I suspect this may have something to do with Blogdiggers use of the <a href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/feedmesh/">FeedMesh</a> to find new posts quickly.</li>
+</ul>
+</p>
+
+<p><img src="http://www.mackmo.com/nick/images/agro-graph.gif" alt="Hits for " />
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ask Bjørn Hansen: volunteer to run the shorten IRC bot</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>I used to run an <span class="caps">IRC </span>robot called <a href="http://metamark.net/bot">shorten</a> that'd scan the channels it was on for long <span class="caps">URL</span>s and shorten them using Metamark:http://metamark.net/</p>
+
+<p>Not using <span class="caps">IRC</span> I'd forget to keep it running, so it's not much use.</p>
+
+<p>If you'd like to volunteer to run it, send me a <a href="mailto:ask@develooper.com">mail</a> and I'll point you to the code.  :-)</p> <p><a href="http://www.askbjoernhansen.com/archives/2005/06/23/shorten.html#comments"> Comments</a></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Apache News Blog: 24 June 2005 - Apache Forrest 0.7 Released</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><a href="http://forrest.apache.org/">Apache Forrest Community</a> is pleased to release the new version: apache-forrest-0.7<br />
+<a href="http://forrest.apache.org/mirrors.cgi">http://forrest.apache.org/mirrors.cgi</a>
+<p></p>
+Apache Forrest is a publishing framework that transforms input from various sources into a unified presentation in one or more output formats. The modular and extensible plugin architecture is based on Apache Cocoon and relevant standards, which separates presentation from content. Forrest can generate static documents, or be used as a dynamic server, or be deployed by its automated facility.
+<p></p>
+Full list of changes: <a href="http://forrest.apache.org/docs_0_70/changes.html">http://forrest.apache.org/docs_0_70/changes.html</a>
+<p></p>
+Upgrade guide: <a href="http://forrest.apache.org/docs_0_70/upgrading_07.html">http://forrest.apache.org/docs_0_70/upgrading_07.html</a>
+<p></p>
+Thanks for your interest, from <a href="http://forrest.apache.org/">the Apache Forrest community</a>.
+<p></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Felipe Leme: Things to do in San Francisco when your schedule is dead</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">In a few hours I'm leaving Sao Paulo headed to San Francisco, for the JavaOne conference.
+
+As I have to wait for the departure time, I'm blogging about some things I'm probably doing in the conference.</p><p class="itemTitle">Ask Bjørn Hansen: Any subscribers to the Norwegian "Linux Magasinet"?</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>On the <a href="http://smtpd.develooper.com/">qpsmtpd</a> mailinglist <a href="http://use.perl.org/~Matts/journal/">Matt</a> <a href="http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.qpsmtpd/3241">writes</a></p>
+
+<blockquote><p>Apparently there's an article on qpsmtpd in Norway's "Linux Magasinet" this month. Print only.</p></blockquote>
+
+<p>Anyone with a copy and a scanner?  :-)</p>
+
+<p><strong>update</strong> - seems like a copy of it is on its way, thanks <a href="http://thefeed.no/marcus/">marcus</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.askbjoernhansen.com/archives/2005/06/23/001223.html#comments"> Comments</a></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Rich Bowen: Word processing</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>While I recognize that there are people who need word processors like Microsoft Word and its ilk, I really hate these tools, and wish daily for a writing tool that will just get out of my way and let me write. As I have mentioned, I am writing a book. And, like every other publisher, this one has their own MS Word Template File to which I must slavishly adhere. So, if I want something to appear in monospace black courier, like source code, I make it green times new roman to indicate that desire. Somehow, in the typesetting process, they then magically convert that to the wrong style so that it will look funny in the finished pro
 duct.</p>
+	<p>At least, this has been my experience numerous times in the past.</p>
+	<p>Over the last 2 days, while I am way way behind schedule, but seeing a chance of catching up, I have spent far more time attempting to make things the right format/style/whatever than actually writing content. In fact, as I look at these meagre three paragraphs, I realize that I have written more in the last 2 minutes than in the 2 hours leading up to that. This is profoundly depressing.</p>
+	<p>I really truly don&#8217;t care one whit about page layout. That&#8217;s not my job. My job is to write. I think I&#8217;m pretty good at it. Design and layout, however, are not my forté. And I just don&#8217;t care. So, rather than spending 2 minutes writing a page of prose, I spend a hour trying to get one little phrase to show up as inline code, monospaced, and green, without turning the entire page to flashing blue text underlined with red squigglies.</p>
+	<p>I really hate MS Word. Can I please find a publisher that will just let me write in POD, or LaTeX, or plain text, or something at least remotely sensible? It seems not, since this is the third publisher I&#8217;ve worked with.</p>
+	<p>I&#8217;m *really* excited about this book. It&#8217;s going to be a great book. Unfortunately, the process is robbing me of most of the enjoyment. <img src="http://drbacchus.com/wordpress/wp-images/smilies/icon_sad.gif" alt=":-(" class="wp-smiley" />
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Sam Ruby: Hurry, quantities limited!</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div><a href="http://blog.hundhausen.com/Own+Your+Very+Own+128bit+Identifier.aspx"><cite>Richard Hundhausen</cite></a>: <em>Own your very own 128-bit Uniqueidentifier
+(GUID)</em> [via <a href="http://thedailywtf.com/forums/36898/ShowPost.aspx">
+<cite>The Daily WTF</cite></a>]</div></p><p class="itemTitle">Berin Loritsch: Dealing with the transition from doer to director</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">There comes a dreaded time in a developer's life where they are so appreciated for their ability to deliver quality software on time that they are asked to no longer develop.  They are asked to lead and direct other developers.  I am at that point in my career.  I'd love to be get my hands dirty, but the more I get promoted the more I am taken away from the craft that I love.  I like working with code because it is obedient.  I can easily encorage a program to do what I want it to do.  People are harder.  Even when the people are generally nice guys and get along quite well, you have to learn some tact in dealing with folks.  You get alot farther with honey than you do with vinegar.
+<p>
+That means I'll be more focused on the process and improving our software than I am on actually doing the work on the software.  It means the number of meetings I have to go to will increase.  Bummer.  That's why I love Open Source.  It will never take me away from the task I enjoy.  Sometimes you just want to create great things.  There's a different satisfaction from being the guy who did something than there is being the guy who told people how to do something.  Its more satisfying when you are the one who conquered the monster bug or fixed the architectural issues.</p><p class="itemTitle">Gregor J. Rothfuss: the state of open source content management</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">my article on <a href="http://www.content-wire.com/Custom/Documents/DocumentItem/cutter%20may%20issue.pdf#page=26">the state of open source content management</a> is now available, via <a href="http://www.content-wire.com/">content-wire</a>. the blurb read
 s:
+
+<blockquote>Content management is no exception to this shift toward open source tools. Gregor J. Rothfuss writes about the current state of open source content management and identifies the important applications that will continue to evolve in the next 10 years. Rothfuss describes the progress on a standard for repository-based content (JSR 170) and the fascinating advances driven by software for online collaboration used by open source projects. Finally, he provides a snapshot of the leading open source CMSs — Apache Lenya, Midgard, OpenCms, Plone, and TYPO3. Based on the concepts and applications Rothfuss describes, open source projects will continue to challenge the market position of the traditional vendors by promoting open standards and innovation.</blockquote></p><p class="itemTitle">Ted Leung: Dare - a web page is not an API or a platform</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+[via <a href="http://www.25hoursaday.com/weblog/PermaLink.aspx?guid=87ad1fa6-08a9-491f-90c3-c77b22002c0c" id="87ad1fa6-08a9-491f-90c3-c77b22002c0c">Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life</a> ]:
+</p><p>
+The fun with Greasemonkey has only begun.  Dare reports on changes to Gmail that broke Stephen O'Grady's Greasemonkey scripts.   Dare's response is:
+</p><blockquote>
+I find this hilarious. Greasemonkey scripts work by effectively screen scrapping the        website and inserting changes into the HTML. Stephen and others who are upset by Google's        change are basically saying that Google should never change the HTML or URL structure        of the website ever again because it breaks their scripts. Yeah, right.     
+<br />
+<br />Repeat after me, a web page is not an API or a platform.     
+</blockquote><p>
+I pointed out the same in the comments to this <a href="http://www.sauria.com/blog/computers/programming/1238">post</a>.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ben Hyde: Freeloading on the healthcare system</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Massachusetts, where I live, has a Republican governor who has been attempting to make progress on the healthcare debacle.  The other day an article appeared in the paper with the latest chapter in this ongoing attempt.  The word &#8220;freeloading&#8221; appeared in the article; to suggest that the current refinement&#8217;s goal is to remove options for freeloading on the system.</p>
+	<p>Freeloading is a problem in all collective action systems.  It&#8217;s one of the reasons that classical minded economists run screaming from the analysis of public goods - you know, like public schools, public roads, public health, environmental regulation, etc. etc.  More mature economists get a gleam in their eye and roll up their sleeves, of course.</p>
+	<p>One way to pull the rug out from under any collective activity is to highlight how some people are, or might, be getting<br />
+a better deal than others.  For example you announce that families with more children are freeloading on the public schools, or that my acquaintance who got encephalitis is freeloading on the health care system.  Of course that was probably caused by cut backs on the public health expense of keeping the mosquito population under control.</p>
+	<p>My first thought when people mention freeloading as a problem around healthcare is Wal*Mart.  World&#8217;s largest corporation which manages to avoid much of the responsibility for healthcare that comes with being an employer.   Employer responsibility for health care was one of the bargains struck by American society during the 20th century; it arose out of union negotiations.  Over the last 30 years corporations have discovered that as unions weaken and their political power has increased they can opt-out of that bargain.  The society has yet to reach a new consensus about how to bear this responsibility.</p>
+	<p>Of course there are lots of other candidates for the the role of healthcare freeloader; or to use more exaggerated speech - parasites.  A lot of money has been spent to cast malpractice lawyers into this role, though the data would seem to suggest it&#8217;s the malpractice insurance providers who benefit from that subplot.</p>
+	<p>My impression is that since we have a total breakdown in the consensus about where the responsibility for healthcare resides we have fallen into a messy trap where all the players spend vast amounts of resources attempting to shift responsibility to somebody else.  The business community created that mess.  All now compete to see if they can shift costs someplace else.</p>
+	<p>The governor&#8217;s plan is to force individuals to buy health insurance, much as we force everybody to buy car insurance in this state.  So today&#8217;s casting for the role of freeloader is individuals.  That&#8217;s a very popular move on the right, shift risk onto the weakest player in the social game.</p>
+	<p>But looking more closely it&#8217;s interesting to note that the governor is, at the same time, trying to force employers to provide health insurance.  To make them pick up the responsibility they dropped over the last few decades.  Of course the details of that make all the difference.</p>
+	<p>One last detail, states are not allowed to work on problems like this without the permission of the Bush administration.  To institute any change in the regulatory framework the state has to be granted a waver.  Only one state has managed to get a waver that allowed them force firms to bear some of the responsibility, i.e. Hawaii.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">David Reid: Montreal</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">Montreal</p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: MSWord and the layout of death</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+On both my main VMWare windows images, that is, at home and work, MSWord 2003 hangs during picture layout. Meaning you can get a doc, start paging through it and suddenly, its hosed, CPU at 100%, all you can do is kill the system. Turn on picture placeholders and it works, except you cant see the pictures.
+</p>
+<p>
+Its only my pure winxp laptop that word is reliable. 
+</p>
+<p>
+Today, in a fit of dissatisfaction, I embraced the dinosaur, and rolled back MSword 2003 to msword XP, while leaving the rest of the installation alone. Result? No good, msword xp hangs in the same place. Maybe there is some shared COM object in the 2003 installation that implements the hanging. I suppose I could bring up a debugger and get a stack trace, but I don't even have VS.net installed on those VMs. 
+</p>
+<p>
+Whatever the problem is, I find it really frustrating. What makes it worse is that windows-crash-reporting thing, which just means the app takes longer to crash, but from which you never get any acknowledgement. "help us fix our next version, the one which will cost you more as it won't ship till after your subscription expires, maybe this one will lay out images without crashing". That feature is turned off.
+</p>
+<p>
+Closing with something nice about office 2003, we now have Exchange-over-https working, which means you can run outlook from a laptop without putting up the VPN. As that and groove meet my work collaboration needs, and apache and sourceforge are my CVS repositories, I no longer need a VPN for day to day work. nice.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: nice feedback</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+Someone has been reading our paper, and
+<a href="http://hinchcliffe.org/archive/2005/06/21/403.aspx">
+notes that it criticies O/X mapping in general, not just JAXRPC</a>. That it does, which is
+why JAXRPC's get out clause "we delegate O/X mapping to something else" isn't a valid excuse.
+</p>
+<p>
+Their  
+<a href="http://hinchcliffe.org/oc.cs.txt">C# client implementation</a> shows lots of Xpath work, which is a better way to work with things. I don't know about generating requests from strings like that though; its a bit too crude. In this particular case, it works :)
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Felipe Leme: SOIA - Specfiy Once, Implement Anywhere</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">Have you ever wondered how hard it is to switch the implementation for a JCP-based technology? Here is my recent experience on the JSF arena...</p><p class="itemTitle">Matthew Langham: Open Source in the Public Sector? Do the paperwork!</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+Back from attending <a href="http://www.linuxtag.org/typo3site/bubk.html?&amp;L=0">LinuxTag</a> and it was interesting to see how the German public sector is (slowly) turning to Open Source. Currently the main problem seems to be that companies offering Open Source based solutions or services find it hard to do the paperwork properly. There are strict rules governing the procurement process and if you don't supply the correct paperwork - then your bid will be thrown out without evaluation. 
+</p><p>
+One of the panel speakers citied various examples of Open Source based bids that were better - technically - but didn't meet the binding criteria when it came to supplied documents on the company and/or employee skills.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: Modular Ant</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+Reasonable little <a href="http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2005/06/22/modularant.html">
+OnJava</a> article on modular ant; having a master build file delegating to sub modules with the &lt;ant&gt; target.
+</p>
+<p>It's bemusing that this is accompanied by an x-ref to Ant:the def guide, 2nd edition, because that book doesnt cover such things. They would have been better off pointing to chapter 10 "large projects", in Java dev with ant.
+</p>
+<p>
+I'd fault the article for not looking at &lt;import&gt; which makes it easier to manage those modules. A good import means that you dont have many build files to maintain, just one base file that breaks code in interesting ways when it gets changed. i.e. you edit it to fix one project, and 15 others break. Just a warning, based on personal experience.
+</p>
+<p>
+I also think it has to do more on library management, but that is still very leading edge. Speaking of which, I need to get Gump to include Maven at tasks on my build's classpath.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ugo Cei: Java Conference ?05</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>I&#8217;m blogging this from the exhibition floor of the <a href="http://it.sun.com/eventi/jc05/">Java Conference &#8216;05 in Milan</a>, where <a href="http://www.pronetics.it/">we</a> have a presence. You&#8217;d expect that technical conferences like this one have free WiFi connectivity, but yesterday the only access point that I could detect led to a gateway page for a for-pay service.</p>
+	<p>Today I discovered an open access point instead. I don&#8217;t know if it is open on purpose but it doesn&#8217;t seem to be provided by the organization. Anyway, HTTP works, ssh works and Skype works, but IMAP, POP and AIM do not go through. Strange.</p>
+	<p>I briefly stuck my head into the room where Craig McClanahan was extolling once more the virtues of <a href="http://java.sun.com/j2ee/javaserverfaces/">JSF</a> but after five minutes I decided I wasn&#8217;t interested. In the afternoon I plan to attend the <a href="http://it.sun.com/eventi/jc05/programma.html#parallela1_23">session</a> by my namesake Ugo Landini on patterns, which promises to be entertaining. I wonder whether there&#8217;s going to be WiFi in that room.</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ben Hyde: Shifting Distribution and Coordination Costs</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Here&#8217;s a slightly formal way to look at various ways of coordinating an activity.  This grew out of my thinking about how to push content from producers to consumers without introducing a hub that coordinates the work.  I was thinking about who bears the bandwidth costs.</p>
+	<p><img src="http://enthusiasm.cozy.org/images/ProducerCoordinates.png" alt="" align="right" />One obvious way to solve the problem is to have the producer ship the content directly to all N consumers.  He pays for N units of outbound bandwidth and each of his consumers pays for 1 unit of inbound bandwidth.  The total cost to get the message out is then 2*N.  Of course I&#8217;m assuming inbound and outbound bandwidth costs are identical.  If we assume that point to point message passing is all we&#8217;ve got, i.e. no broadcast, then 2*N is the minimal overall cost to get the content distributed.</p>
+	<p>Two issues.  All else being equal the producer would like to shift costs onto the consumers.  Secondly - the hard problem here is not moving the bytes around; the hard problem is coordinating their movement.  In the our first model most of the coordination cost is born by the producer.  That has the benefit that coordination expertise will accumulate so that the cost of coordination can fall and the quality can rise.  The producer retains substantial control over the relationships.</p>
+	<p><img src="http://enthusiasm.cozy.org/images/ConsumersCoordinate.png" alt="" align="left" />It&#8217;s not hard to imagine solutions where the consumers do more of the coordination, the cost is split more equitably, the producer&#8217;s cost plummet, and the whole system is substantially more fragile.  For example we can just line the consumers up in a row and have them bucket brigade the content.  We still have N links, and we still have a total coast of 2*N, but most of the consumers are now paying for 2 units of bandwidth; one to consume the content and one to pass it on.  In this scheme the producer lucks out and has to pay for only one unit of band width, as does the last consumer in the chain.  This scheme is obviously very fragile.  A design like this minimizes the chance of coordination expertise condensing so it will likely remain of poor quality and high cost.  Control over the relationships is very diffuse.</p>
+	<p><img src="http://enthusiasm.cozy.org/images/MiddlemanCoordinates.png" alt="" align="right" />We can solve the distribution problem by adding a middleman.  The producer hands his content to the middleman (adding one more link) and the middleman hands the content off to the consumers.  This market architecture has N+1 links or a total cost of this scheme is 2*(N+1).  Since the middleman can server multiple producers the chance for coordination expertise to condense is generally higher in this scenario.  Everybody, except the middleman, see their costs drop to 1.  Assuming the producer doesn&#8217;t mind being intermediated he has incentive to shift to this model.  His bandwidth costs drop from N to 1, and he doesn&#8217;t have to become an expert on coordinating distribution.  The middleman becomes a powerful force in the market. That&#8217;s a risk for the producers and the consumers.</p>
+	<p><img src="http://enthusiasm.cozy.org/images/SwarmCoordinates.png" alt="" align="left" />It is possible to solve problems like these without a middleman, instead we introduce exchange standards.   Replacing the middleman with a standard.  Aside: Note that the second illustration, Consumers coordinate, is effectively showing a standards based solution as well.  We might use a peer to peer distribution scheme, like Bit Torrent for example.  To use Bit Torrent&#8217;s terminology the substitute for the middleman is called &#8220;the swarm&#8221; and the coordination is done by an entity known as the &#8220;the tracker.&#8221;  I didn&#8217;t show the tracker in my illustration.  When bit torrent works perfectly the producer hands one Nth of his content off to each of the N consumers.  They then trade content amongst themselves.  The cost is approximately 2 units of bandwidth for each of them.  The tracker&#8217;s job is only to introduce them to each other.  The coordination
  expertise is condensed into the standard.  The system is robust if the average consumer contributes slightly over 2 units of bandwidth to the enterprise, it falls apart if that median falls below 2.  A few consumers willing to contribute substantially more than 2N can be a huge help in avoiding market failure.  The producer can fill that role.</p>
+	<p>Of course swarming is not the only way we can arrange a standards based solution to this problem.  It&#8217;s notable because it is both reliable and the total bandwidth cost can be 2N, the minimum.  I find it interesting that when the cost approachs that minimum the swarm becomes unreliable.  The second model where consumers coordinate the distribution in a bucket brigade can be made more reliable by introducing additional redundant links; these are another way to buy reliablity in exchange for increasing the cost above the 2N minimum.</p>
+	<p>I find it fascinating to see how the coordination costs, market power, and reliability of the market&#8217;s clearing are shifted around in these various scenarios.  The bandwidth costs act as a partial proxy for those.  Market participants are most concerned about risk.  They want to place their faith in a market structure.  Once the rendezvous around a given structure then can have a meaningful discussion about the risks that structure creates.  The first model has the risk of powerful producer.  The second and last models have the risk of policing standards compliance.  The middleman has well known agency risks.</p>
+	<p>Standards based solutions always have problems with policing and freeloading.  I think it&#8217;s neat to notice that if the producers and consumers are exchanging data over many time periods they can establish a trading framework with reputation, currency, and market clearing schemes that assure that everybody contributes their 2 units of bandwidth.  In effect you can make such systems self policing in much the same manner used in a competitive market.  Which goes to reenforce the way that exchange standards create and shape markets.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ted Leung: Linda Stone on the future of attention</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+[via <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/oreilly/radar/atom?m=138">O'Reilly Radar</a> ]:
+</p><p>
+Nat Torkington posted a great set of <a href="http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2005/06/supernova_2005_2.html">notes</a> on Linda Stone's talk at SuperNova.   A while back I was fortunate enough to spend some time talking with Linda about the ideas in Nat's notes.   If you are interested in attention, you really need to look over the notes.   A lot of the current discussion about attention (at least related to RSS) has focused on the technology aspects -- how to collect attention data, how to mark it up, and how to mix up the data to do triage.  Linda's stuff looks at the human impact of the attention problem, and that's not just limited to RSS.   Here's her take on where it's all going:
+</p><blockquote>
+The next aphrodisiac is committed full-attention focus.  In this new area,  experiencing this engaged attention is to feel alive.  Trusted  filters, trusted protectors, trusted concierge, human or technical,  removing distractions and managing boundaries, filtering signal from  noise, enabling meaningful connections, that make us feel secure, are  the opportunity for the next generation.  Opportunity will be the tools and technologies to  take our power back.
+</blockquote><p>
+As additional food for thought: some of these ideas are similar to themes in <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect?tag=tedleungonthe-20%26link_code=xm2%26camp=2025%26creative=165953%26path=http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html%253fASIN=0670887366%2526tag=tedleungonthe-20%2526lcode=xm2%2526cID=2025%2526ccmID=165953%2526location=/o/ASIN/0670887366%25253FSubscriptionId=02ZH6J1W0649DTNS6002" id="2025%2526ccmID=165953%2526location=/o/ASIN/0670887366%25253FSubscriptionId=02ZH6J1W0649DTNS6002">"The Support Economy: Why Corporations Are Failing Individuals and The Next Episode of Capitalism" (Shoshana Zuboff, James Maxmin)</a>.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ian Holsman: If you look REALLY hard</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>you can see me waving</p>
+	<p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=melbourne,+Australia&#038;spn=0.042057,0.096903&#038;t=k&#038;hl=en">Melbourne Australia in Google maps</a><br />
+They haven&#8217;t got full resolution yet, but it&#8217;s nice that OZ is there at all.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Dan Diephouse: "Open" Standards from MS and IBM</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p><a href="http://blogs.cocoondev.org/dims/archives/003214.html">Davanum Srinivas</a>:</p>
+
+	<blockquote>
+		<p> Verisign has graciously initiated the process for donating TSIK to Apache. As part of the process, we started discussions on legal aspects and found that any one who implements WS-Security needs licenses from IBM and Microsoft. Note that this does not only affect TSIK incubation, but also the existing Apache WSS4J project. </p>
+	</blockquote>
+
+	<p>This is no good, no good at all&#8230;</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Sylvain Wallez: The real reason why Apple switches to Intel :-)</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">I found <a href="http://blog4.lemondeinformatique.fr/le_blog_des_cybriens/2005/06/macintel.html">the answer on François Cointe's blog</a>, who publishes weekly comic strips in a major french IT magazine. Here's the translation...<br /><br />Top strip:<br /><ul><li>Putting Intel chips in Mac laptops because PowerPC chips are too hot, that's stupid!</li><li>Hot Macs, that is great!</li></ul>Bottom strip:<br /><ul><li>If this can make sterile all those that buy Macs to show-off by burning their balls, then that's perfect!</li><li>Shut up! Macs, they are beautiful.</li><li>When you'll be as beautiful as they are, I'll buy you an iPod...</li></ul><br />So that's the real reason behind the switch to Intel processors: ensuring Powerbook buyers will be able to have children... who 
 will also buy Macs. A long-term business plan :-)<br /><br /></p><p class="itemTitle">Davanum Srinivas: Patent problems implementing WS-Security</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">Verisign has graciously initiated the process for donating TSIK to Apache. As part of the process, we started discussions on legal aspects and found that any one who implements WS-Security needs licenses from IBM and Microsoft. Note that this does...</p><p class="itemTitle">Rodent of Unusual Size (Ken Coar): Communicators need love, too</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><br />
+So cough up.
+        <br />
+        <i>Updated: Wednesday, 22 June 2005 12:56 EDT</i>
+        <br />
+        <p>
+The
+<a href="http://freenode.net/"><cite>Peer-Directed Projects Centre</cite></a>
+provides an IRC network that's heavily used by a lot of people
+I know.  They're a non-profit, and I just want to urge anyone
+who reads this to consider
+<a href="http://freenode.net/pdpc.shtml">donating</a>
+<i>via</i> the sidebar on the <code>freenode.net</code> site.
+They have significant expenses, and every little bit helps.
+</p>
+<p>
+That is all.
+</p>
+
+       <br />
+       <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1501;comments=true">Comments (0)</a> <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1501;comments=true">Trackbacks (0)</a></p><p class="itemTitle">Davanum Srinivas: MTOM support in WSE 3.0 CTP</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">Mark asked for some feedback on WSE 3.0 CTP. Here's my 2 cents. Switching on MTOM behavior: #1: all base64Binary fields are eligible for MTOM-ming. #2: You can control the behavior of the client or server using the mtom element...</p><p class="itemTitle">Rich Bowen: Buy now! Avoid the last-minute rush!</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>My book is <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/asin/1590595610/drbacchus">now available on Amazon</a>. Wow. I guess I should order it and see how it turns out, so that I can finish writing it.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Rodent of Unusual Size (Ken Coar): It's email all the way down</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><br />
+Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow.. Sufficient unto the day are the emails thereof.  More than sufficient, I'd say.
+        <br />
+        <i>Updated: Wednesday, 22 June 2005 06:25 EDT</i>
+        <br />
+        <p>
+To borrow a signature line from
+<a href="http://www.wvah.com/programs/raymond/peterboyle.shtml"><cite>Peter Boyle</cite></a>:
+</p>
+<h3>Holy crap!</h3>
+<p>
+I noticed this morning that there was a 74MiB (yes, seventy-four
+MEGABYTE) message in one of my folders.  From a rational and
+reasonable person.  Closer examination revealed an interesting
+(though irksome) pathology:
+</p>
+<ol>
+ <li>The body of the message is the actual text, with another
+  message header &amp; body appended as part of it.</li>
+ <li>The body of the appended message is base64 encoded; when
+  decoded, it includes the text that goes with the header,
+  with another header and encoded body appended.</li>
+ <li>And so on.</li>
+</ol>
+<p>
+In case that's not clear (and it sure isn't to me on re-reading),
+try this:  Somehow, a message got its body base64 encoded and
+it (header and body) got appended to another message's textual
+body.  Then <em>that</em> message got its body base64 encoded,
+and <em>its</em> header and body got appended to yet another
+message's textual body.  And so on, for 74MiB.
+<p>
+And it's not even all one thread!
+</p>
+<p>
+This email is like an ogre.  And I don't mean it's growing
+little white hairs in the Sun.
+</p>
+<p>
+Considering the size of the thing, I'm going to have to whip
+up a script to peel away each successive layer and turn the
+whole mess into an mbox file I can import.  (Probably in Perl
+because of the CPAN modules for MIME and mail manipulation.)
+Emacs has already flinched repeatedly at the amount of memory
+required to frob the thing, so this ought to be entertaining.
+</p>
+
+        <br />
+        [<i>There is an image associated with this entry.</i>]
+       <br />
+       <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1500;comments=true">Comments (0)</a> <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1500;comments=true">Trackbacks (0)</a></p><p class="itemTitle">Andrew Savory: My home and work on google maps</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><a href="http://www.andrewsavory.com/blog/work_bike_route.png"><img src="http://www.andrewsavory.com/blog/work_bike_route-tm.jpg" height="100" width="95" border="1" align="right" hspace="4" vspace="4" alt="Work Bike Route" /></a>When Paul told me last night that Google Maps now did satellite, I didn't realise he was talking about the high-resolution photos that are now available (low-res was available for a while now).
+<br /><a href="http://agylen.com/2005/06/21/my-home-on-google-maps/">Ugo links to his home</a>, so I'm going to link to my <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=nr5+9df&#38;spn=0.006427,0.006266&#38;t=k&#38;hl=en">home and work on google maps</a>, to illustrate how close I am to work. Looking at the photos, they are approximately 1-2 years out-of-date .... there's now almost solid housing to the left, and as I grumbled back in March, the field in the middle has been <a href="http://www.andrewsavory.com/moblog/archives/2005_03.html#000623">dug up</a>.
+<br />Of course, the blue route suggested by Google is suboptimal as it's (a) for cars and (b) seems to go through a bus lane. I've therefore done a quick edit to highlight the route I take (marked in green) via bike. Mind you, going straight across steep fields is less workable by car anyway ;-)</p><p class="itemTitle">Adrian Sutton: Ruby On Rails - Not As Happy</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+       So I've been getting into Ruby on Rails and things started out well, had the basis of an application up<br />
+      pretty quickly and now I'm starting to get into the logic of the app rather than just pulling values out of<br />
+      the database and displaying them. &#160;Productivity is droping, very rapidly.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       The problems all seem to come down to the lack of a good IDE. &#160;Specifically:
+    </p>
+	<ul>
+	<li>
+        I have no idea where the definition of methods etc are. &#160;Are they inherited? &#160;Are they dynamically<br />
+        generated by something?
+      </li>
+	<li>
+        I have no idea where the documentation for stuff is. &#160;Is it at api.rubyonrails.com, is it on ruby-doc.org,<br />
+        is it buried somewhere in my gems installation?
+      </li>
+	<li>
+        Navigating files is just too slow.
+      </li>
+	</ul>
+	<p>
+       It wouldn't take much of an IDE to fix those problems just display a nice list of files in the project down<br />
+      the side with tabbed editors, then have the ability to select a method, variable, etc and jump to it's<br />
+      definition or it's documentation.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       Other than that the lack of documentation and/or the lack of organization to the documentation is really getting<br />
+      annoying. &#160;Often the documentation is out there, you just don't know how to find it. &#160;Sometimes the<br />
+      documentation is just not comprehensive enough, is too vague or ambiguous.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       There's also a few weird things that come up from time to time and working out what went wrong is very<br />
+      difficult. &#160;For instance, I wanted to check over user input before saving it to the database to avoid rouge<br />
+      HTML tags causing problems etc. &#160;So in the appropriate controllers I wrote (among many other attempts):
+    </p>
+	<pre>
+    def before_save
+        hash = Hash.new
+        attributes.each_pair do | key, value |
+            if !value.nil? and value.is_a? String
+                hash[key] = filterHTMLTags(value)
+            else
+                hash[key] = value
+            end
+        end
+        attributes = hash
+    end
+</pre>
+	<p>
+       filterHTMLTags is defined and does what it sounds like. &#160;You'd think this would filter any string<br />
+      values before saving them to the database, but it's effectively a no-op. &#160;The values are saved to the<br />
+      database in their unsafe form.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       If however you make the last line:
+    </p>
+	<pre>
+self.attributes = hash
+</pre>
+	<p>
+       It works. &#160;I assume the first version made a local variable called "attributes", assigned hash to<br />
+      it and dumped it when it went out of scope &#160;(@attributes didn't help here either btw).<br />
+      &#160;self.attributes seemed to kick Ruby into method call mode and called attributes= with hash as an argument<br />
+      so it stored correctly. &#160;I could understand this behavior if I also had to say self.attributes to get the<br />
+      value, but it's very odd to have the behavior differ.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       Of course I'm clearly just misunderstanding things and these learning pains will reduce as I learn more<br />
+      about Ruby and Rails (though the file navigation problem is only going to get worse) but it's worth noting<br />
+      that this is definitely no panacea and there are still gotchas and time sinks hidden around the place.
+    </p></p><p class="itemTitle">Brett Porter: JavaOne Beer JUG - Maven and ActiveMQ</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Looks like there a few fun gatherings happening at JavaOne next week. I'm a first-timer, so I'm looking forward to it.</p>
+
+<p>&lt;plug&gt;<br />
+I'll be at the free "<a href="http://www.simulalabs.com/JUGevent-register.php">beer JUG</a>" on the Tuesday night at 6pm, where the Maven devs will be talking about Maven 2.0 and Continuum, and the ActiveMQ folks will be talking about their latest development. There's also appetizers, an open beer and wine bar, and free t-shirts.<br />
+&lt;/plug&gt;</p>
+
+<p>I thought I'd get the word out - hope to see you there, and during the conference drop by the Mergere booth and say hi!</p>
+
+<p><small>(apologies to javablogs readers who see this twice... I've filed it! http://jira.atlassian.com/browse/BLOG-156)</small></p>
+
+<p><hr /></p><hr /></p>
+
+<p>**Seating is limited -- Register Now to Attend**<br />
+ <br />
+WHAT:	Open Source "BEER JUG" Event!<br />
+WHEN:	6.28.05 - Tuesday Night 6:00pm after JavaOne<br />
+WHERE:	Sheraton Palace Hotel (2 Blocks North of Moscone)</p>
+
+<p>This free event includes appetizers, open beer and wine bar, and t-shirts for all attendees!<br />
+ <br />
+Learn about the newest versions of ActiveMQ and Maven, including: new features, component changes, core capabilities, and best practices. Get the scoop first-hand from the projects' primary contributors, and speak with other developers who are implementing these Open Source technologies into business solutions. Presenters include: 	 <br />
+ <br />
+Jason van Zyl, Project Chair at Maven and Continuum<br />
+James Strachan, Project Lead at ActiveMQ<br />
+Winston Damarillo, CEO, Simula Labs and Founder, Gluecode Software</p>
+
+<p><a href="http://www.simulalabs.com/JUGevent-register.php">http://www.simulalabs.com/JUGevent-register.php</a></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ted Leung: The Monad shell</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+A new build of Monad is <a href="http://www.proudlyserving.com/archives/2005/06/new_monad_build.html">up</a>.   I'm glad that someone is trying to push the command line interface forward.  I don't boot up a Windows box often enough to download it (at least not until we have Macs that run Windows or a Monad that can run on Mono), but I'm keeping an eye on what's happening with Monad.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Nick Lothian: Agro the Aggregator</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p><a href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/index.jsp">Agro the Aggregator</a> is my experimental proof of concept 
+syndication client. Basically I'm not happy with the web based aggregators currently available, and Agro lets me 
+experiment with various ideas I have for improving them. (Note that this was 3 or 4 days of after work hacking,
+so don't expect the world...)</p>
+
+<p>In particular, I'm interested in using textual analysis to help the user find the information
+that interests them as quickly as possible.</p>
+
+<p>I'm also interested in using some of the modern web-as-a-platform webservices to proactivly
+gather and present related information to the user.</p>
+
+<p>Currently, Agro uses Classifier4J to allow the user to filter sites by topic (currently
+limited to "Java programming" and "US Politics"). It also uses Classifier4J to extract keywords
+for each item, and them some AJAX techniques (using DWR) to retrieve related news from Yahoo.</p>
+
+<p>Agro the Aggregator is ugly in all browsers (I hate CSS), but works best in Firefox (actually I haven't
+bothered to look at it in IE).</p>
+
+<p>Some of the software used to build Agro the Aggregator includes:
+	<ul>
+		<li><a href="http://classifier4j.sourceforge.net/">Classifier4J</a></li>			
+		<li><a href="http://www.getahead.ltd.uk/dwr/">DWR</a></li>	
+		<li><a href="http://ehcache.sourceforge.net/">EHCache</a></li>	
+		<li><a href="http://openrico.org/home.page">OpenRico</a></li>														
+		<li><a href="http://www.springframework.org/">The Spring Framework</a></li>
+		<li><a href="http://wiki.java.net/bin/view/Javawsxml/Rome">ROME</a>/<a href="http://wiki.java.net/bin/view/Javawsxml/RomeFetcher">ROME Fetcher</a></li>
+	</ul>
+</p>
+
+<p>Agro currently aggregates the following sites (click the link to see the aggregated view):
+	<ul>
+		<li><a class="sitelink" href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/ui/bbc">BBC</a></li>		
+		<li><a class="sitelink" href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/ui/boingboing">BoingBoing</a></li>	
+		<li><a class="sitelink" href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/ui/javablogs">JavaBlogs</a></li>							
+		<li><a class="sitelink" href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/ui/planetapache">PlanetApache</a></li>
+		<li><a class="sitelink" href="http://www.mackmo.com/agro/ui/wired">Wired</a></li>
+	<ul>	
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Rich Bowen: OSCon</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Having left everything to the last possible minute, I was of course unable to find any tickets to Portland under the travel budget. Fortunately, the OSCon travel agent came through for me and found tickets for about half of anything I was able to find. So, my momentary panic that I would not be able to make it to OSCon has abated. So, now I just need to figure out what I&#8217;m going to say.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Dan Diephouse: Why the OOP?</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Reading <a href="http://www.davidchappell.com/HTML_email/Opinari_No13_06_05.html">David Chappell&#8217;s latest newsletter:</a></p>
+
+	<blockquote>
+		<p>To understand why a service-oriented world implies an explicit role for access, think about why these different parts of an application exist at all. Arguably the biggest reason is that each uses a different abstraction, and so crossing from one to another requires mapping between these abstractions. For example, moving between data and logic typically requires translating from relations to objects. This translation&mdash;restructuring data from tables into objects and mapping from SQL types to programming language types&mdash;is a well-understood, if still painful, problem.</p>
+	</blockquote>
+
+	<p><img src="http://www.davidchappell.com/EMAIL_images/13_Service_Oriented_graph_2.jpg" alt="" width="368" height="203" /></p>
+
+	<p>[Image reproduced here from David Chappell&#8217;s website]</p>
+
+	<p>Why the objects in this diagram? Why don&#8217;t be build services just over the database? An XML database with XQuery translating back and forth to different services seems like an interesting combination to me.</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Paul Querna: New Job.</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">I am extremely excited to announce that I have accepted a Job Offer from <a href="http://www.askjeeves.com/" class="ng_url">AskJeeves</a>, at <a href="http://www.bloglines.com/" class="ng_url">Bloglines</a> in <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Los+Gatos&spn=0.751215,1.365051&hl=en" class="ng_url">Los Gatos</a>.  More info coming in the next couple days, but among other things, this means I am moving to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/22/national/22raid.html" class="ng_url">California</a>.</p><p class="itemTitle">Sam Ruby: Retrofitting Backlinks</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div><p>
+<a href="http://www.dehora.net/journal/2005/06/scrapemonkey.html">
+<cite>Bill de hÓra</cite></a>: <em>here?s a strawman. Retrofitting
+backlinks dominates Web innovation - pagerank, wikis, tags,
+folksonomies, trackback, pingback, bloglines, del.icio.us, pubsub,
+technorati - enabling backlinking is what releases value. When
+people talk about building out social computing infrastructure,
+backlinking is also the basis for that.</em></p>
+<p>First reaction: very interesting.  Second reaction:
+<a href="http://www.shirky.com/writings/evolve.html">so
+what</a>?</p></div></p><p class="itemTitle">Nick Lothian: Google Maps now supports Australia</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Google Maps now supports Australia and includes Satellite pictures of most cities (including Adelaide).</p>
+
+<p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=34.934+S+138.624+E&t=k&hl=en">Here is my work.</a></p></p><p class="itemTitle">Gregor J. Rothfuss: great pitch</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><a href="http://www.everylastounce.com/mysql.html">adam fields</a> has a great page to attract new consulting business. well done.</p><p class="itemTitle">Gianugo Rabellino: At least Google won't bomb me...</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>After reading the latest <a href="http://del.icio.us/post?url=http://agylen.com/2005/06/21/my-home-on-google-maps/&amp;title=My%20home%20on%20Google%20Maps">post</a> from Ugo, I tried to play the Google Maps game as well. It looks like I've been lucky enough not to be on Google Maps for a couple of miles:</p>
+	<p><img src="http://www.rabellino.it/blog/media/googlemaps.jpg" border="0" alt="Google Maps sucks!" /></p>
+	<p>let's say I live up north the blurred line, just follow the highway, take the next exit, turn right, left, then right and you're basically there. So, waiting for Google Maps to arrive, at least I know that for a while I'll be safe from Internet aware missile bombers.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: Suse 9.3 pro ships with a broken CVS server</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+The title says it all. CVS 1.12.11 has a <a href="http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/bug-cvs/2005-02/msg00002.html">
+bug</a>, which surfaces on some third party clients, i.e. the ones I use. 
+</p>
+<p>
+You need v1.12.12 <i>or</i> v.1.11.20, the last 'stable item'</p>
+<p>
+I'm not 100% happy w/ suse 9.3; I think its too bleeding edge to be workable. It ships with a beta of OpenOffice (a beta of something whose releases are as robust as cheddar gorge limestone), and even CVS server is broken. No plans to rush out and upgrade my primary two desktops, not with my home music/CVS server failing one of its two uses.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ugo Cei: My home on Google Maps</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p><img src="http://agylen.com/wp-content//my-house.jpg" border="0" height="139" width="156" alt="my-house.jpg" align="right" />If you live in the US or the UK, this will not strike you as something new, but until a couple of minutes ago I wasn&#8217;t aware that Google Maps satellite images now covered most of Europe at the maximum resolution.</p>
+	<p>Now, I can finally see <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=45.183206,9.147363&amp;spn=0.004807,0.006223&amp;t=k&amp;hl=en">how my house looks like when seen from space</a>. Neat!</p>
+	<p>Unfortunately, maps are still missing. Only satellite images are provided, but I guess they will be there soon.</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ugo Cei: Furniture</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p><a href="http://www.horm.it/prodotti/images_contenitori/immagini/20050308100747gra.jpg" title="Click to enlarge"><img src="http://agylen.com/wp-content//20050308100747pic.jpg" border="0" height="80" width="114" alt="Horm furniture" align="right" /></a><a href="http://agylen.com/2005/06/07/the-mirra-chair/">After the chair</a>, today I&#8217;ve also probably found a cupboard and a table for my new home office. I&#8217;m pretty much sold on the <a href="http://www.horm.it/eng/prodotti_di_design/contenitori/contenitori-foto.php?id=40">Polka Dots</a> cupboard from <a href="http://www.horm.it/">Horm</a>, but I&#8217;m still relatively undecided on the table. The <a href="http://www.horm.it/eng/prodotti_di_design/tavoli/tavoli.php?id=68">Bello!</a> i
 s nice but maybe a little small.</p>
+	<p>Together they make up a very nice combination (click on the image to enlarge it) and the price is much less than what I had anticipated, given the price at what designer furniture is typically sold. Assuming I can make up my mind on the table, I am going to place an order for them by the end of this week.</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Brian McCallister: Continuous Performance Testing Seminar in Philly</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div><p>
+My employer, <a href="http://www.chariotsolutions.com/">Chariot Solutions</a>, is holding a <a href="http://www.chariotsolutions.com/performance/">Continuous Performance Testing</a> seminar on July 19th in Philadelphia (from the flyer):
+</p>
+<blockquote>
+<p>
+Two weeks before a system goes live, you get the bad news. It's not even close to meeting performance goals. You call an emergency meeting and find out that there are major design flaws that were only revealed under load. Basic tuning won't help, so you're faced with two unhappy alternatives: miss the release date or go live and hope to fix performance in a point release.
+</p>
+<p>
+You're not alone. Early detection of poor performance is a difficult problem. Recent integration trends, from SOA to ESB to portals, have made performance analysis even more complex, and more critical. Yet, how can you accurately predict the performance of a system before it has been implemented end to end? Faced with this challenge and the high cost of leading test tools, most teams plan to test performance in the final stages of the project past the point at which core designs can be changed.
+</p>
+<p>
+There is another way. In this seminar, we'll share successful strategies for continuous performance testing throughout the software lifecycle, using proven techniques and free tools. Upfront planning defines goals and metrics for each component. Early prototypes validate new designs. Application scaffolding and test automation provide nightly feedback with minimal overhead. Monitoring frameworks follow the application into production, allowing timely analysis in those critical first weeks after a release. Throughout the process, the architect is in control, focusing on the problems that really do need to be fixed now, while avoiding premature optimization for those that don't.
+</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p>
+It's free, so <a href="http://www.chariotsolutions.com/performance/">register</a> if you're interested.
+</p></div></p><p class="itemTitle">Brian McCallister: XMLStarlet on OS X</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><div><p>
+Previously I had installed <a href="http://xmlstar.sourceforge.net/">XMLStarlet</a> (the fantastic xml command line tool) via fink, so it came prepatched. As I recently moved to DarwinPorts after running into too many things refusing to build from fink, I discovered XMLStarlet isn't there =( Anyway, it references <code>foo.a</code> style libraries instead of <code>foo.dylib</code>, so here is a <a href="http://morphy.skife.org/xmlstartlet-osx.patch">trivial patch</a> to allow it to build on OS X =)
+</p></div></p><p class="itemTitle">Steve Loughran: Online services that suck</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+I remember changing money in Darjeeling once, UK pounds to Rupees. There were about four different counters you had to go through, before you got your brick of cash, stapled together to stop anyone pilfering notes. As I walked from counter to counter holding my physical cookie (a numbered token), a book went from counter to counter bank-side, recording the rest of the transation. Nothing happened without everything being in sync. 
+</p>
+<p>All this was done to prevent fraud by the bank staff, with or without the involvement of the customer. But had another feature. Just as I was sitting there bemoaning how much easier it would be with computers, all the power in the bank went out. Everyone carried on talking in the darkness, and when the lights came on we resumed the transaction. The manual process was significant more fault tolerant than the online one.</p>
+<p>
+Today I went to renew my car tax disc, an annual fee of £135 pounds for the option to drive a diesel van round town. Online. Which includes a real time check that the toy is insured and with an MOT certificate of vehicle safetiness. All that worked, until I hit the "pay now" button...
+</p>
+<p>
+At which point the <a href="http://www.vehiclelicence.gov.uk/EvlPortalApp/">server stopped responding</a>. No timeout, no error, just a 10 minute hang which was enough for me to declare it dead.
+</p>
+<p>
+now, where was the transaction. Was it "no cash paid" or was it "money gone through". No easy way to tell, I sent an email off to their contact address. 
+</p>
+<p>
+Five hours later I get an automated reply saying "there will be some delay in processing". Five hours? For automated reply? I can't even think how on earth you code a mail handler not to automatically reply to incoming mail, instead queueing it for 4 hours and 59 minutes until a machine feels ready to send a "please wait message". Someone, somewhere has spent a lot of money building a system that either by intent or implementation, has 5 hour delays before generating an automatic response to inbound email. 
+</p>
+<p>I don't think that bodes well for the stability of the actual tax purchase transaction. Next year: I will go to a post office and do it by hand. If the government cannot do online processing right, we should not encourage them</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Rodent of Unusual Size (Ken Coar): Local PHP group in the Triangle</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><br />
+PUG or do not PUG; there is no Tri!
+        <br />
+        <i>Updated: Wednesday, 22 June 2005 05:44 EDT</i>
+        <br />
+        <p>
+A few weeks ago, there was an announcement made on the
+<a href="http://trilug.org/">local Linux group</a>'s
+mailing list about the creation of a local PHP group.  Although
+interested, I didn't get involved because they were using
+Yahoo! Groups for their mailing stratum, and I have a
+long-standing detestation/hate feeling toward that particular
+medium.
+</p>
+<p>
+However, I got PMed in IRC a few days ago, and thereby informed
+that the mailing lists had moved to Mailman instead.  So I
+signed up like a shot.
+</p>
+<p>
+It's the Triangle PHP Users Group
+(<a href="http://www.tripug.org/">TriPUG</a>),
+and we'll see where it goes.  Come one, come all!
+</p>
+
+       <br />
+       <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1499;comments=true">Comments (0)</a> <a href="http://Ken.Coar.Org/burrow/index?entry=1499;comments=true">Trackbacks (0)</a></p><p class="itemTitle">Davanum Srinivas: Update to Gmail Persistent Searches</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription">I can't live without mihai's excellent tool that adds persistent searches to gmail. A few days ago, gmail folks modified a few things and the script stopped working. Here's the patched script that works....</p><p class="itemTitle">Leo Simons: There really are a lot of really nice people in open source</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>Janne wrote an entry <a href="http://www.ecyrd.com/ButtUgly/Wiki.jsp?page=Main_blogentry_180605_1">Depressed over Daisy</a> that struck my nerve. Steven (behind Daisy) <a href="http://blogs.cocoondev.org/stevenn/archives/003206.html">was struck as well, and wrote about it</a>. They did a
  virtual hug. Some other people hugged innocent bystanders at random.</p>
+
+<p>This is the kind of professional open source that I love to see. With lots of respect for one another, granting each other the space they deserve, and trying hard to focus on the positive.</p>
+
+<p>As much as I think cocoon is in many ways total insanity from the tech perspective (it takes longer to compile than the linux kernel and the smallest java hosting plans won't let you take it to "hello world" as you run out of diskspace just unpacking the servlet war. Oh, and xml.), I've always been very fond of these guys and their community, and am very impressed at the <a href="http://www.orixo.com/">business alliance</a> growing cool stuff around it, and how these guys remain ethetical and enthusiastic participants in the FLOSS community.</p>
+
+<p>LSD <strong>*hugs*</strong> (cocoon,jspwiki).</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Adrian Sutton: Funnies</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+       It's really worth subscribing to <a href="http://blogs.sun.com/roller/page/kazem">"kazem's"<br />
+      cartoon</a> feed for some quality geek laughs. &#160;Occasionally he turns into a bit of a Sun shill (he does<br />
+      work for Sun) but mostly it's just general laughs from a (software) bug's life. &#160;Fortunately<br />
+      there's now a happy little orange icon linking to the RSS feed - it took me ages to find it originally as it<br />
+      was in no way linked (it's <a href="http://blogs.sun.com/roller/rss/kazem">here</a> for the record).
+    </p></p><p class="itemTitle">Adrian Sutton: The New Technorati</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+       <a href="http://agylen.com/2005/04/28/technorati-hates-me/">Ugo Cei commented</a> on the new technorati<br />
+      interface and while I think it's an improvement over their previous attempt, it still needs work.<br />
+      &#160;Searches work consistently now, but it's still way too hard to find the RSS feed for the search and<br />
+      there appears to be a few bugs which prevent you from getting access to one at all for some searches.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       Oh well, looks like I'll be using the <a href="http://www.symphonious.net/2005/05/22/netnewswire-and-feedster/">Feedster integration with NetNewsWire</a><br />
+      for a while longer. &#160;I did send them some feedback which hopefully made sense, I'm not really sure how<br />
+      to accurately describe the problems I was having with finding feeds.
+    </p></p><p class="itemTitle">Adrian Sutton: Virtual Server Options</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+       While this site is graciously hosted by <a href="http://www.diffidence.org">Iain</a> I'm in the process of<br />
+      developing another site (non-blog) and the more I think it through the more likely it is that it's going to<br />
+      drive a not insignificant amount of traffic and I definitely want it to be snappy all the time (as opposed to<br />
+      slowing down when Iain decides to download too much at once). &#160;At the same time I keep playing with<br />
+      different technologies from J2EE to Ruby on Rails to custom perl apps and whatever else, so being able to set up<br />
+      whatever I want is a pretty big bonus.&#160;&#160;Sounds like a virtual server might just be the best bet but I<br />
+      really don't want to spend much money.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       Anyone got suggestions for cheap virtual hosting providers that are still of reasonable quality?<br />
+      &#160;Australian based is a bonus but not required. &#160;The best looking one I've found so far is <a href="http://www.eapps.com">EApps</a> though I really haven't looked around much.
+    </p></p><p class="itemTitle">Adrian Sutton: This Is Why I Hate Marketing</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+       Hey I stopped short of saying this is why I hate marketers&#8230;
+    </p>
+	<blockquote>
+	<p>
+         <a href="http://radio.weblogs.com/0001011/2005/06/21.html#a10452">How many more Microsoft sites will open<br />
+        without RSS? Sigh.</a>
+      </p>
+	<p>
+         Sigh, <a href="http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/prophoto/default.mspx">Microsoft<br />
+        opens another cool but lame site</a>. Cool cause it's for digital photographers. Lame cause it doesn't<br />
+        have an RSS feed. After Gnomedex these kinds of lame sites will look even lamer! When will Microsoft's<br />
+        marketing departments get the memo? EVERY site MUST have RSS from now on. Got it? No? Pay attention to Dean<br />
+        Hachamovitch's keynote at Gnomedex, OK? He runs the IE team.
+      </p>
+	<p>
+         [<a href="http://radio.weblogs.com/0001011/">Scobleizer: Microsoft Geek Blogger</a>]
+      </p>
+	</blockquote>
+	<p>
+       Gee, anyone would think Scoble was trying to drop hints that the IE team are announcing something to do with RSS<br />
+      at Gnomedex. &#160;For all Scoble's talk of how blogs are a conversation that let you see more transparently<br />
+      into an organization he sure spends a lot of time massaging his posts to fit the marketing message he wants to<br />
+      push. &#160;It's probably too harsh to say it's deceptive advertising because that normally means the<br />
+      message they're delivering is deceptive, rather than just the way they deliver it. &#160;I just get really<br />
+      annoyed when companies try to play the friendly, upfront, honest card while they've marked the deck and have<br />
+      carefully selected which cards to keep up their sleeve.
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       Wouldn't it have just been easier to put out a post that says "Hey, listen out for a cool message from<br />
+      the IE team on RSS in the Gnomedex keynote"? &#160;I've tried to resist joining the crowds of people<br />
+      criticizing Scoble for just being a Microsoft shill but it's getting harder and harder as each post seems to<br />
+      reach new levels of "I'm towing the company line but pretending not to".
+    </p>
+	<p>
+       And don't even get me started about the "conversation" Scoble's having with his son which just<br />
+      so neatly advertises Microsoft's music initiatives and tries to steer people away from using the iPod.<br />
+      &#160;No mention of what his son's looking for in a music player, just a torrent of reasons the iPod is crap.<br />
+      &#160;Maybe it is for his son, but maybe it's not - there are good and bad points to all MP3 players and in a<br />
+      lot of cases the iPod family has the best fit for the requirements and not just because it's cool.<br />
+      &#160;Heck, the prime requirement for most <em>tweens</em>&#160;is coolness. &#160;Couldn't let that<br />
+      interfere with the marketing message though could we? &#160;Oops, I got started.
+    </p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ted Leung: Innovation Happens Elsewhere</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p>
+Morgen Kaufmann has recently published a book on open source:
+</p><p>
+<img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1558608893.01._SCTHUMBZZZ_.jpg" />
+<br /><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1558608893/tedleungonthe-20">Innovation Happens Elsewhere : Open Source as Business Strategy</a>
+</p><p>
+I was one of the external reviewers for the book, and it's a solid effort.  Over the years I've talked to lots of people about open source and answered a lot of questions.   Many of those questions are addressed in the book.   There are chapters that cover the reasons why you might get involved in open source, and there are several practical chapters that discuss the nuts and bolts of setting and participating in open source projects. 
+</p><p>
+The authors, <a href="http://today.java.net/pub/au/21">Dick Gabriel</a> and <a href="http://today.java.net/pub/au/22">Ron Goldman</a>, are old time Lisp hackers -- I've followed Gabriel's <a href="http://www.dreamsongs.com/index.html">work</a> for years, so it was a treat to be a reviewer.  Both have been involved in open source software since before it was called open source, and they've had a lot of experience working with some of Sun's open source communities
+</p><p>
+If you have questions about open source, or want to read a good treatment, you should pick up this book (the content will be <a href="http://dreamsongs.com/IHE/">online</a> at some point).  I know that I am going to be directing people to the book when they want to know more about open source.
+</p></p><p class="itemTitle">Ugo Cei: New Technorati goes live?</p><p class="itemLink"><link href=""/></p><p class="itemDescription"><p><img src="http://agylen.com/wp-content//tn-logo.gif" border="0" height="40" width="221" alt="tn-logo.gif" align="right" />&hellip; a bit too early, probably. At the moment:</p>
+	<ul>
+	<li>Search is not working:
+	<pre>While trying to retrieve the URL: http://technorati.com/search/agylen.com
+	
+The following error was encountered:
+	
+    * Zero Sized Reply 
+	
+Squid did not receive any data for this request.</pre>
+</li>
+	<li>Resetting your password does not work.</li>
+	<li>The Technorati bot is <a href="http://agylen.com/2005/04/28/technorati-hates-me/">still not spidering my weblog</a>, even though I ping it regularly, and my account page shows &#8220;0 links from 0 sources&#8221;. Yeah, right.</li>
+	</ul>
+	<p>I guess the new Technorati website would have benefited from a longer beta testing period.</p></p></section></body></document>

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