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From ftho...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1458111 - /flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage
Date Tue, 19 Mar 2013 03:37:50 GMT
Author: fthomas
Date: Tue Mar 19 03:37:49 2013
New Revision: 1458111

URL: http://svn.apache.org/r1458111
Log:
Updated for Svn to Git migration

Modified:
    flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage

Modified: flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage?rev=1458111&r1=1458110&r2=1458111&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage (original)
+++ flex/site/trunk/content/dev-faq.cmsPage Tue Mar 19 03:37:49 2013
@@ -1,98 +1,98 @@
-Title:  Frequently Asked Questions
-
-This page covers some frequently asked questions that we get on the mailing lists.  We will
be updating it with more
-content as time goes on.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Can I have write access to the SVN?</h4></div>
-Due to legal reasons, only people who have been elected as committers have access to update
or contribute code directly to the project.
-We at Apache take the legality of code seriously, and nothing would be worse than somebody
contributing code that
-they don't own and a 3rd party having a legal claim to our framework.  That being said, you
can submit code by providing
-`.patch` files (diff files) to the project.  Check out the [Get Involved][1] page for more
details on how to do that.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>How is this different than Adobe Flex?</h4></div>
-In November, 2011, Adobe announced they were no longer supporting Adobe Flex.  Instead of
just killing the framework they
-donated it to Apache.  Apache Flex 4.8.0 is essentially the exact same version of Flex as
Adobe's last official
-version.  Since that initial donation the Apache Flex team has been working hard on fixing
bugs, providing additional
-components and finishing unfinished components.  As we progress through additional versions,
we will be less and
-less like Adobe's Flex framework, but we will strive to be compatible with it.
-
-Adobe has offered some of their customers extended support contracts, and may produce additional
versions, but
-that is unlikely.  Future support of the Flex Framework is through this project.
-
-There are a few differences you should be aware of in the Apache version of the SDK.  Most
notably, the Flash Player will
-not cache RSLs created with Apache Flex.  You can find out more in the RELEASE_NOTES file
in your SDK download
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>I've used Adobe Flex before.  How do I start using
Apache Flex?</h4></div>
-The quickest way to start using Apache Flex is to use the Apache Flex SDK Installer.  This
AIR application will download
-the latest version of the Apache Flex SDK and all the required components to make it work.
 It will also set the proper
-options so that the SDK can be used with your favorite IDE such as Flash Builder, FDT, Flash
Develop or IntelliJ.
-To use the SDK Installer, go to the ["Download the SDK Installer"][4] link under the downloads
menu above.  It will
-walk you through the rest of the process.
-
-Once you have the SDK on your computer, it should be just like the old Adobe SDK you were
already using.  Make sure
-to check the RELEASE_NOTES file for a full list of differences.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Why are you not using GIT/GitHub?</h4></div>
-The Apache Flex PMC voted on a resolution to move the project to Git once the Apache Infrastructure
supported the move.
-There is no timeline on that move at this time.  A mirror of the project is currently available
on GitHub, but we are
-not accepting pull requests at this time. (However we can accept patch files generated from
pull requests.)
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>I don't have time to read the mailing lists.  How can
I keep up with the project?</h4></div>
-The [Open Spoon Foundation][2] has been providing monthly updates as to the goings-on of
the Apache Flex project through
-their "Apache Revue" newsletter.  You can also check out the [Apache Flex Blog][3] for critical
updates.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Where can I find the Apache Flex Roadmap?</h4></div>
-We do not have a roadmap.  That is not the Apache Way™.  Apache Flex is a project run
and maintained by volunteers.  The
-way that Apache works is that each developer do what they are passionate about.  There is
no release schedule,
-and therefore, there is no official roadmap.  You can always make suggestions via JIRA or
the mailing lists for
-new features that you wish to see and if they are good enough a developer will pick them
up.  You can always
-contribute your own code for new features as well.  You can find out more about contributing
code on the [Get
-Involved page][1].
-
-All that being said, you can check out what developers are working on by peeking in the "Whiteboard"
area of the
-source control.  There is a lot of cool projects incubating there that may (or may not) make
it into future
-releases.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>What happens to my projects if Adobe Discontinues the
Flash Player?</h4></div>
-It is true that current Flex projects are tied to either the Adobe Flash Player or Adobe
AIR.  We have been making great
-strides to compile projects to native JavaScript, therefore bypassing the Flash Player in
the browser.  Adobe
-has made a commitment to support the Flash Player and our current runtime for at least 5
years from the time
-they donated the project to Apache.  You can find out more about their roadmap on the [Adobe
Flash Whitepaper][5].
-
-Event if Adobe no longer created new versions of the Flash Player, it is still had an incredible
install base
-(being installed on over 90% of internet-connected PCs).  If the Flash Player were no longer
updated today, it would
-still be installed just about everywhere.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Will my code work on Platform X?</h4></div>
-The currently released version of Apache Flex will output to either SWF of AIR.  SWF is supported
within browsers on
-Windows 2000 through Windows 8, Mac OSX, Linux (using Chrome), many phones and some smartphones.
 AIR allows
-you to take your Flex application and output native applications for Android (2.2+), iOS
(3+),certain
-BlackBerry QNX devices (Playbook), MacOSX and Microsoft Windows.
-
-We are currently working on supporting JavaScript as an output.  This will increase support
to anywhere HTML5
-is supported.
-
-Other platforms may be added if Adobe AIR beings to support them.  Unfortunately, we are
not in control of adding
-additional support for other platforms at this time.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Can I submit apps I make with Apache Flex to App Store
X?</h4></div>
-By using Adobe AIR with Apache Flex, you can produce applications that can be submitted to
the Apple App Store, Android
-Market, Apple Mac App Store and Blackberry App World.  There are very successful projects
that have been submitted
-to all of the above.  In fact, you can actually use one code base to create apps for each
of the different platforms
-to submit to all of the different stores!
-
-Apache Flex coupled with Adobe AIR allows you to make Apple iOS Applications from a Windows
PC.  You will need a Mac in
-order to submit the app to the store.
-
-<div class="headline"><h4>Does Apache Flex cost money?</h4></div>
-No.  This is a completely open-source project and uses the [Apache License v. 2.0][6].  This
allows you to use the SDK and
-any outputs of the SDK for personal and commercial use with virtually no restrictions.  Some
of the recommended tooling
-(not produced by Apache) costs money, however you are more than free to use the included
command-line compilers
-and toolsets.
-
-[1]: community-getinvolved.html
-[2]: http://www.spoon.as
-[3]: http://blogs.apache.org/flex/
-[4]: installer.html
-[5]: http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flashplatform/whitepapers/roadmap.html
+Title:  Frequently Asked Questions
+
+This page covers some frequently asked questions that we get on the mailing lists.  We will
be updating it with more
+content as time goes on.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Can I have write access to GIT?</h4></div>
+Due to legal reasons, only people who have been elected as committers have access to update
or contribute code directly to the project.
+We at Apache take the legality of code seriously, and nothing would be worse than somebody
contributing code that
+they don't own and a 3rd party having a legal claim to our framework.  That being said, you
can submit code by providing
+`.patch` files (diff files) to the project.  Check out the [Get Involved][1] page for more
details on how to do that.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>How is this different than Adobe Flex?</h4></div>
+In November, 2011, Adobe announced they were no longer supporting Adobe Flex.  Instead of
just killing the framework they
+donated it to Apache.  Apache Flex 4.8.0 is essentially the exact same version of Flex as
Adobe's last official
+version.  Since that initial donation the Apache Flex team has been working hard on fixing
bugs, providing additional
+components and finishing unfinished components.  As we progress through additional versions,
we will be less and
+less like Adobe's Flex framework, but we will strive to be compatible with it.
+
+Adobe has offered some of their customers extended support contracts, and may produce additional
versions, but
+that is unlikely.  Future support of the Flex Framework is through this project.
+
+There are a few differences you should be aware of in the Apache version of the SDK.  Most
notably, the Flash Player will
+not cache RSLs created with Apache Flex.  You can find out more in the RELEASE_NOTES file
in your SDK download
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>I've used Adobe Flex before.  How do I start using
Apache Flex?</h4></div>
+The quickest way to start using Apache Flex is to use the Apache Flex SDK Installer.  This
AIR application will download
+the latest version of the Apache Flex SDK and all the required components to make it work.
 It will also set the proper
+options so that the SDK can be used with your favorite IDE such as Flash Builder, FDT, Flash
Develop or IntelliJ.
+To use the SDK Installer, go to the ["Download the SDK Installer"][4] link under the downloads
menu above.  It will
+walk you through the rest of the process.
+
+Once you have the SDK on your computer, it should be just like the old Adobe SDK you were
already using.  Make sure
+to check the RELEASE_NOTES file for a full list of differences.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Why are you not using GitHub?</h4></div>
+The Apache Flex PMC voted on a resolution to move the project to Git once the Apache Infrastructure
supported the move.
+There is no timeline on that move at this time.  A mirror of the project is currently available
on GitHub, but we are
+not accepting pull requests at this time. (However we can accept patch files generated from
pull requests.)
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>I don't have time to read the mailing lists.  How can
I keep up with the project?</h4></div>
+The [Open Spoon Foundation][2] has been providing monthly updates as to the goings-on of
the Apache Flex project through
+their "Apache Revue" newsletter.  You can also check out the [Apache Flex Blog][3] for critical
updates.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Where can I find the Apache Flex Roadmap?</h4></div>
+We do not have a roadmap.  That is not the Apache Way™.  Apache Flex is a project run
and maintained by volunteers.  The
+way that Apache works is that each developer do what they are passionate about.  There is
no release schedule,
+and therefore, there is no official roadmap.  You can always make suggestions via JIRA or
the mailing lists for
+new features that you wish to see and if they are good enough a developer will pick them
up.  You can always
+contribute your own code for new features as well.  You can find out more about contributing
code on the [Get
+Involved page][1].
+
+All that being said, you can check out what developers are working on by peeking in the "Whiteboard"
area of the
+source control.  There is a lot of cool projects incubating there that may (or may not) make
it into future
+releases.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>What happens to my projects if Adobe Discontinues the
Flash Player?</h4></div>
+It is true that current Flex projects are tied to either the Adobe Flash Player or Adobe
AIR.  We have been making great
+strides to compile projects to native JavaScript, therefore bypassing the Flash Player in
the browser.  Adobe
+has made a commitment to support the Flash Player and our current runtime for at least 5
years from the time
+they donated the project to Apache.  You can find out more about their roadmap on the [Adobe
Flash Whitepaper][5].
+
+Event if Adobe no longer created new versions of the Flash Player, it is still had an incredible
install base
+(being installed on over 90% of internet-connected PCs).  If the Flash Player were no longer
updated today, it would
+still be installed just about everywhere.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Will my code work on Platform X?</h4></div>
+The currently released version of Apache Flex will output to either SWF of AIR.  SWF is supported
within browsers on
+Windows 2000 through Windows 8, Mac OSX, Linux (using Chrome), many phones and some smartphones.
 AIR allows
+you to take your Flex application and output native applications for Android (2.2+), iOS
(3+),certain
+BlackBerry QNX devices (Playbook), MacOSX and Microsoft Windows.
+
+We are currently working on supporting JavaScript as an output.  This will increase support
to anywhere HTML5
+is supported.
+
+Other platforms may be added if Adobe AIR beings to support them.  Unfortunately, we are
not in control of adding
+additional support for other platforms at this time.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Can I submit apps I make with Apache Flex to App Store
X?</h4></div>
+By using Adobe AIR with Apache Flex, you can produce applications that can be submitted to
the Apple App Store, Android
+Market, Apple Mac App Store and Blackberry App World.  There are very successful projects
that have been submitted
+to all of the above.  In fact, you can actually use one code base to create apps for each
of the different platforms
+to submit to all of the different stores!
+
+Apache Flex coupled with Adobe AIR allows you to make Apple iOS Applications from a Windows
PC.  You will need a Mac in
+order to submit the app to the store.
+
+<div class="headline"><h4>Does Apache Flex cost money?</h4></div>
+No.  This is a completely open-source project and uses the [Apache License v. 2.0][6].  This
allows you to use the SDK and
+any outputs of the SDK for personal and commercial use with virtually no restrictions.  Some
of the recommended tooling
+(not produced by Apache) costs money, however you are more than free to use the included
command-line compilers
+and toolsets.
+
+[1]: community-getinvolved.html
+[2]: http://www.spoon.as
+[3]: http://blogs.apache.org/flex/
+[4]: installer.html
+[5]: http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flashplatform/whitepapers/roadmap.html
 [6]: about-licensing.html
\ No newline at end of file



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