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From Bulu <b...@romandie.com>
Subject Re: OSGi and Git - what release process, how many repos?
Date Wed, 20 Aug 2014 12:15:27 GMT
Thanks to all for sharing your workflows.

I think the main conclusion is, that there is still a gap here - most 
respondents either have had to build their own release/commit tool or 
are working all in one repo.
Given the ubiquity of git and OSGi, I would argue that having a tool to 
manage the release of a group of OSGi bundles, each of which is in a 
separate git repos, in a generic form would be a big benefit.

Are there any existing efforts in this direction?

Regards
    Philipp



On 20.08.2014 01:12, Dragos Dascalita Haut wrote:
> In a similar way I've been using for more than 1 year git-subtree. Mostly Jenkins cares
about it.
>
> All my bundles are "symbolic linked " with git-subtree into a single git repository and
developers only care about 1 repo.
>
> Each bundle has its own repo too, which is used when performing releases.
>
> When happy hour for release comes Jenkins gets the latest code from the subtree, pushes
it into the particular git repo of that bundle, performs the maven release, versions are increased
and at the end Jenkins pulls the new pom file into the main git repository.
>
>
> HTH,
> Dragos Dascalita Haut
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Aug 19, 2014, at 12:04 PM, Cristiano GaviĆ£o <cvgaviao@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>> Currently I'm with Carsten, after suffering trying to release bundles with different
version in same git repository.
>> For new project I decided to go with this path: one bundle (or more than one if they
are enough tight to share same version) per git repository.
>>
>> In addition we created a special repository containing the corporate pom and scripts
(with a file listing existing repositories) that can clone, pull, etc all repositories together...
>>
>> and this way we can release every bundle separately using maven-release-plugin and
a tagged version is just for this bundle, avoid confusing when need to back to an old version
or need to work with more than one version at same time (multi-tenant).
>>
>> regards,
>>
>> Cristiano
>>> On 12-08-2014 06:48, Bulu wrote:
>>> Hi Paul, hi all
>>>
>>> Do I understand correctly, that your bundles have different (semantic) version
numbers, but are always tagged all at the same time?
>>>
>>> Regarding Git though, I'm still confused.
>>> Carsten Ziegler advocates the one repo - one bundle. Which certainly makes sense,
for separate bundle release cycles.
>>> Mathilde even had to build an own building tool, I hope I can avoid that (maybe
you want to check out the repo tool from google https://code.google.com/p/git-repo/ which
is used by Android)
>>> And Paul Bakker has one repo for all bundles, all in one Eclipse workspace.
>>>
>>> So we have all possible combinations...
>>> I would love to here more experiences of other people doing OSGi on Git...
>>>
>>> Regards Philipp
>>>
>>>
>>>> On 11.08.2014 15:21, Paul Bakker wrote:
>>>> Hi Bulu,
>>>>
>>>> All our projects are based on Bndtools. This is by far the best development
>>>> environment for OSGi and I strongly advise taking a look at it.
>>>> We build using Gradle, which is supported directly in bnd.
>>>>
>>>> All bundles that belong to the same "product" are in the same
>>>> Bndtools/Eclipse workspace, and the same GIT repo. Separating this even
>>>> further makes development much harder and doesn't really have any benefits.
>>>> The set of bundles that are part of a deployment are defined in a bnd "run
>>>> configuration". When creating a release of the product we set a tag in GIT
>>>> and run a build from this tag. The delivery from the build are the JARs
>>>> defined in the run configuration. To give an indication, our larger
>>>> projects might have ~200 bundles from a single workspace. As long as you
>>>> adhere to modularity rules when it comes to bundle and service design it
>>>> doesn't really mater if these bundles come from the same development
>>>> workspace.
>>>>
>>>> In our projects we also use baselining; each bundle is versioned
>>>> individually using the semantic versioning rules. Baselining means that the
>>>> build checks if the bundle version (and export package versions) are still
>>>> correct. This means that although we always tag our complete product
>>>> version in GIT, it might mean that a new product release only contains a
>>>> single updated bundle.
>>>>
>>>> Our release process is entirely automated, all the way from setting the tag
>>>> to deploying to production servers and is used on several large projects.
>>>>
>>>> Cheers,
>>>>
>>>> Paul
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 12:25 PM, Bulu <bulu@romandie.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi all
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm new to Git and want to use it for my new OSGi project. The project
>>>>> will be split in some ~20 bundles which are intended to work together
and
>>>>> form a single shippable product with a unique release version number.
>>>>> Nonetheless, at a later time, some of these bundles might be used outside
>>>>> of that product in separate projects.
>>>>>
>>>>> I would like to have your experience what works and what doesn't. (links
&
>>>>> readings also welcome)
>>>>>
>>>>> First purely OSGi: the full product version 1.0 is comprised of bundles
>>>>> each of which has a different version number in itself. Where do you
store
>>>>> that information? Does each bundle get to know that it is part of a parent
>>>>> release 1.0? Is Maven the (only? best?) way to go?
>>>>> The bundles will still be tightly coupled - eg. change the API, change
the
>>>>> impl, change all consumers. So is the "typical" release process to have
all
>>>>> bundles in -SNAPSHOT and only change that to a valid version when a release
>>>>> is getting prepared?
>>>>>
>>>>> Now I want to use git for this. Do you recommend having
>>>>> 1. one repo per bundle (what tools to use for managing that many repos?)
>>>>> 2. one branch per bundle in a single repo
>>>>> 3. use git submodules
>>>>> 4. other approaches?
>>>>>
>>>>> My "main-line" will probably be latest&greatest of all bundles. I
will
>>>>> want to run integration tests which assembles the fully working product
and
>>>>> then runs the tests. Are there any advantages or disadvatages to any
of the
>>>>> approaches above (eg. for the continuous integration, building from sources
>>>>> etc)?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks for your answers.
>>>>>    Philipp
>>>>>
>>>>> PS: I understand my question is not specifically linked to Felix
>>>>> (although, that's what I use). If you consider this too much off-topic,
>>>>> please recommend another forum.
>>>>>
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