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From bridg...@apache.org
Subject [1/2] drill git commit: typo
Date Sat, 15 Aug 2015 01:02:28 GMT
Repository: drill
Updated Branches:
  refs/heads/gh-pages 2345c749f -> 53008ee1a


http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/050-create-view.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/050-create-view.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/050-create-view.md
index 3c8c0d9..83dda83 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/050-create-view.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/050-create-view.md
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ stored query. A view can combine data from multiple underlying data sources
 and provide the illusion that all of the data is from one source. You can use
 views to protect sensitive data, for data aggregation, and to hide data
 complexity from users. You can create Drill views from files in your local and
-distributed file systems, Hive, HBase, and MapR-DB tables, as well as from
+distributed file systems, such as Hive and HBase tables, as well as from
 existing views or any other available storage plugin data sources.
 
 ## Syntax

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/060-describe.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/060-describe.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/060-describe.md
index 6623c8f..837494c 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/060-describe.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/060-describe.md
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ The DESCRIBE command supports the following syntax:
 ## Usage Notes
 
 You can issue the DESCRIBE command against views created in a workspace and
-tables created in Hive, HBase, and MapR-DB. You can issue the DESCRIBE command
+tables created in Hive and HBase. You can issue the DESCRIBE command
 on a table or view from any schema. For example, if you are working in the
 `dfs.myworkspace` schema, you can issue the DESCRIBE command on a view or
 table in another schema. Currently, DESCRIBE does not support tables created

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/090-show-databases-and-show-schemas.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/090-show-databases-and-show-schemas.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/090-show-databases-and-show-schemas.md
index a7d07d2..43d6c55 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/090-show-databases-and-show-schemas.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/090-show-databases-and-show-schemas.md
@@ -17,7 +17,8 @@ The SHOW DATABASES and SHOW SCHEMAS commands support the following syntax:
 
 You may want to run the SHOW DATABASES or SHOW SCHEMAS command to see a list of the configured storage plugins and workspaces in Drill before you issue the USE command to switch to a particular schema for your queries.
 
-In Drill, a database or schema is a configured storage plugin instance or a configured storage plugin instance with a configured workspace. For example, dfs.donuts where dfs is the file system configured as a storage plugin instance, and donuts is a configured workspace.
+In Drill, a database or schema is a storage plugin configuration that can include a workspace. For example, in `dfs.donuts`, `dfs` is the configured file system and donuts the workspace. The workspace points to a directory
+within the file system.
 
 You can configure and use multiple storage plugins and workspaces in Drill.  See [Storage Plugin Registration]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/storage-plugin-registration) and [Workspaces]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/workspaces).
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/100-show-files.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/100-show-files.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/100-show-files.md
index f115c21..1d7e0f9 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/100-show-files.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/100-show-files.md
@@ -39,12 +39,12 @@ local (`dfs`) file system.
 	+------------+-------------+------------+------------+------------+------------+-------------+------------+------------------+
 	|    name    | isDirectory |   isFile   |   length   |   owner    |   group    | permissions | accessTime | modificationTime |
 	+------------+-------------+------------+------------+------------+------------+-------------+------------+------------------+
-	| user       | true        | false      | 1          | mapr       | mapr       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-30 21:37:06.0 | 2014-07-31 22:15:53.193 |
+	| user       | true        | false      | 1          | abcd       | abcd       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-30 21:37:06.0 | 2014-07-31 22:15:53.193 |
 	| backup.tgz | false       | true       | 36272      | root       | root       | rw-r--r--   | 2014-07-31 22:09:13.0 | 2014-07-31 22:09:13.211 |
 	| JSON       | true        | false      | 1          | root       | root       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-31 15:22:42.0 | 2014-08-04 15:43:07.083 |
 	| scripts    | true        | false      | 3          | root       | root       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-31 22:10:51.0 | 2014-08-04 18:23:09.236 |
 	| temp       | true        | false      | 2          | root       | root       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-08-01 20:07:37.0 | 2014-08-01 20:09:42.595 |
-	| hbase      | true        | false      | 10         | mapr       | mapr       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-30 21:36:08.0 | 2014-08-04 18:31:13.778 |
+	| hbase      | true        | false      | 10         | abcd       | abcd       | rwxr-xr-x   | 2014-07-30 21:36:08.0 | 2014-08-04 18:31:13.778 |
 	| tables     | true        | false      | 0          | root       | root       | rwxrwxrwx   | 2014-07-31 22:14:35.0 | 2014-08-04 15:42:43.415 |
 	| CSV        | true        | false      | 4          | root       | root       | rwxrwxrwx   | 2014-07-31 17:34:53.0 | 2014-08-04
 	...

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/110-show-tables.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/110-show-tables.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/110-show-tables.md
index 40621cf..d7a8159 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/110-show-tables.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/110-show-tables.md
@@ -3,8 +3,7 @@ title: "SHOW TABLES"
 parent: "SQL Commands"
 ---
 The SHOW TABLES command returns a list of views created within a schema. It
-also returns the tables that exist in Hive, HBase, and MapR-DB when you have
-these data sources configured as storage plugin instances. See[ Storage Plugin
+also returns the tables that exist in Hive and HBase when you use storage plugin configurations for these data sources. See [Storage Plugin
 Registration]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/storage-plugin-registration).
 
 ## Syntax
@@ -21,8 +20,8 @@ only want information from the `dfs.myviews` schema:
 
     USE dfs.myviews;
 
-In this example, “`myviews`” is a workspace created withing an instance of the
-`dfs` storage plugin.
+In this example, “`myviews`” is a workspace created within the
+`dfs` storage plugin configuration.
 
 When you use a particular schema and then issue the SHOW TABLES command, Drill
 returns the tables and views within that schema.
@@ -31,7 +30,7 @@ returns the tables and views within that schema.
 
   * You can create and query tables within the file system, however Drill does not return these tables when you issue the SHOW TABLES command. You can issue the [SHOW FILES ]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/show-files-command)command to see a list of all files, tables, and views, including those created in Drill. 
 
-  * You cannot create Hive, HBase, or MapR-DB tables in Drill. 
+  * You cannot create Hive or HBase tables in Drill. 
 
 ## Examples
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/120-use.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/120-use.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/120-use.md
index aaaf74f..86464de 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/120-use.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-commands/120-use.md
@@ -16,9 +16,8 @@ The USE command supports the following syntax:
 
 _schema_name_  
 A unique name for a Drill schema. A schema in Drill is a configured storage
-plugin, such as hive, or a storage plugin and workspace. For example,
-`dfs.donuts` where `dfs` is an instance of the file system configured as a
-storage plugin, and `donuts` is a workspace configured to point to a directory
+plugin, such as hive, or a storage plugin and workspace. For example, in dfs.donuts, `dfs` is the configured file system and donuts the workspace.
+The workspace points to a directory
 within the file system. You can configure and use multiple storage plugins and
 workspaces in Drill. See [Storage Plugin Registration]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/storage-plugin-registration) and
 [Workspaces]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/Workspaces).
@@ -113,8 +112,8 @@ the schema.
     +------------+-------------+------------+------------+------------+------------+-------------+------------+------------------+
     |    name    | isDirectory |   isFile   |   length   |   owner    |   group    | permissions | accessTime | modificationTime |
     +------------+-------------+------------+------------+------------+------------+-------------+------------+------------------+
-    | csv        | true        | false      | 1          | mapr       | mapr       | rwxrwxr-x   | 2015-02-09 06:49:17.0 | 2015-02-09 06:50:11.172 |
-    | logs       | true        | false      | 3          | mapr       | mapr       | rwxrwxr-x   | 2014-12-16 18:58:26.0 | 2014-12-16 18:58:27.223 |
+    | csv        | true        | false      | 1          | abcd       | abcd       | rwxrwxr-x   | 2015-02-09 06:49:17.0 | 2015-02-09 06:50:11.172 |
+    | logs       | true        | false      | 3          | abcd       | abcd       | rwxrwxr-x   | 2014-12-16 18:58:26.0 | 2014-12-16 18:58:27.223 |
     +------------+-------------+------------+------------+------------+------------+-------------+------------+------------------+
     2 rows selected (0.156 seconds)
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/005-about-sql-function-examples.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/005-about-sql-function-examples.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/005-about-sql-function-examples.md
index 6c173c2..5f60b47 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/005-about-sql-function-examples.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/005-about-sql-function-examples.md
@@ -2,4 +2,4 @@
 title: "About SQL Function Examples"
 parent: "SQL Functions"
 ---
-You need to use a FROM clause in Drill queries. Examples in this documentation often use `FROM sys.version` in the query for example purposes.
\ No newline at end of file
+You need to use a FROM clause in Drill queries. You can use the VALUES clause in the FROM clause to define rows of data in a derived table. The derived table has statement level scope.
\ No newline at end of file

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/010-math-and-trig.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/010-math-and-trig.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/010-math-and-trig.md
index aa26d66..ec9c168 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/010-math-and-trig.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/010-math-and-trig.md
@@ -46,9 +46,7 @@ Exceptions are the LSHIFT and RSHIFT functions, which take all types except FLOA
 
 ## Math Function Examples
 
-Examples in this section use the `input2.json` file. Download the `input2.json` file from the [Drill source code](https://github.com/apache/drill/tree/master/exec/java-exec/src/test/resources/jsoninput) page. 
-
-You need to use a FROM clause in Drill queries. In addition to using `input2.json`, examples in this documentation often use `FROM sys.version` in the query for example purposes.
+Examples in this section use the `input2.json` file. Download the `input2.json` file from the [Drill source code](https://github.com/apache/drill/tree/master/exec/java-exec/src/test/resources/jsoninput) page. You need to use a FROM clause in Drill queries. 
 
 ### ABS Example
 Get the absolute value of the integer key in `input2.json`. The following snippet of input2.json shows the relevant integer content:
@@ -160,7 +158,7 @@ Open input2.json and change the first float value from 17.4 to 3.14159. Get valu
 
 Get the base 2 log of 64.
 
-    SELECT LOG(2, 64) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LOG(2, 64) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -171,7 +169,7 @@ Get the base 2 log of 64.
 
 Get the common log of 100.
 
-    SELECT LOG10(100) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LOG10(100) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -182,7 +180,7 @@ Get the common log of 100.
 
 Get the natural log of 7.5.
 
-    SELECT LOG(7.5) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LOG(7.5) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +---------------------+
     |       EXPR$0        |
@@ -226,7 +224,7 @@ Drill supports the following trig functions, which return a FLOAT8 result.
 
 Find the sine and tangent of a 45 degree angle. First convert degrees to radians for use in the SIN() function.
 
-    SELECT RADIANS(30) AS Degrees FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT RADIANS(30) AS Degrees FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |  Degrees   |
@@ -235,7 +233,7 @@ Find the sine and tangent of a 45 degree angle. First convert degrees to radians
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.045 seconds)
 
-    SELECT SIN(0.7853981633974483) AS `Sine of 30 degrees` FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT SIN(0.7853981633974483) AS `Sine of 30 degrees` FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +-----------------------+
     |  Sine of 45 degrees   |
@@ -244,7 +242,7 @@ Find the sine and tangent of a 45 degree angle. First convert degrees to radians
     +-----------------------+
     1 row selected (0.059 seconds)
 
-    SELECT TAN(0.7853981633974483) AS `Tangent of 30 degrees` from sys.version;
+    SELECT TAN(0.7853981633974483) AS `Tangent of 30 degrees` from (VALUES(1));
 
     +-----------------------+
     | Tangent of 45 degrees |

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/020-data-type-conversion.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/020-data-type-conversion.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/020-data-type-conversion.md
index 47b2413..f78a987 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/020-data-type-conversion.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/020-data-type-conversion.md
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ You cannot cast a character string that includes a decimal point to an INT or BI
 
 The following example shows how to cast a character to a DECIMAL having two decimal places.
 
-    SELECT CAST('1' as DECIMAL(28, 2)) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CAST('1' as DECIMAL(28, 2)) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ The following example shows how to cast a character to a DECIMAL having two deci
 ### Casting a Number to a Character String
 The first example shows Drill casting a number to a VARCHAR having a length of 3 bytes: The result is a 3-character string, 456. Drill supports the CHAR and CHARACTER VARYING alias.
 
-    SELECT CAST(456 as VARCHAR(3)) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CAST(456 as VARCHAR(3)) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ The first example shows Drill casting a number to a VARCHAR having a length of 3
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.08 seconds)
 
-    SELECT CAST(456 as CHAR(3)) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CAST(456 as CHAR(3)) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ The first example shows Drill casting a number to a VARCHAR having a length of 3
 
 Cast an integer to a decimal.
 
-    SELECT CAST(-2147483648 AS DECIMAL(28,8)) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CAST(-2147483648 AS DECIMAL(28,8)) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-----------------+
     |     EXPR$0      |
     +-----------------+
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ data as encoded VARBINARY data. To read HBase data in Drill, convert every colum
 
 CONVERT_TO also converts an SQL data type to complex types, including HBase byte arrays, JSON and Parquet arrays, and maps. CONVERT_FROM converts from complex types, including HBase arrays, JSON and Parquet arrays and maps to an SQL data type. 
 
-Use the BINARY_STRING and STRING_BINARY custom Drill functions with CONVERT_TO and CONVERT_FROM to see readable results of your conversions.
+Use the BINARY_STRING and STRING_BINARY custom Drill functions with CONVERT_TO and CONVERT_FROM to get meaningful results.
 
 ### Conversion of Data Types Examples
 
@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@ You use the CONVERT_FROM function to decode the binary data to render it readabl
 
 This example converts from VARCHAR to a JSON map:
 
-    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('{x:100, y:215.6}' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('{x:100, y:215.6}' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL FROM (VALUES(1));
     +----------------------+
     |        MYCOL         |
     +----------------------+
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ This example converts from VARCHAR to a JSON map:
 
 This example uses a list of BIGINT as input and returns a repeated list of vectors:
 
-    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('[ [1, 2], [3, 4], [5]]' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL1 FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('[ [1, 2], [3, 4], [5]]' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL1 FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   mycol1   |
     +------------+
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ This example uses a list of BIGINT as input and returns a repeated list of vecto
 
 This example uses a map as input to return a repeated list vector (JSON).
 
-    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('[{a : 100, b: 200}, {a:300, b: 400}]' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL1  FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CONVERT_FROM('[{a : 100, b: 200}, {a:300, b: 400}]' ,'JSON') AS MYCOL1  FROM (VALUES(1));
     +--------------------+
     |       MYCOL1       |
     +--------------------+
@@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ This example uses a map as input to return a repeated list vector (JSON).
 
 ### Set Up a Storage Plugin for Working with HBase
 
-This example assumes you are working in the Drill Sandbox. The `maprdb` storage plugin definition is limited, so you modify the `dfs` storage plugin slightly and use that plugin for this example.
+This example assumes you are working in the Drill Sandbox. You modify the `dfs` storage plugin slightly and use that plugin for this example.
 
 1. Copy/paste the `dfs` storage plugin definition to a newly created plugin called myplugin.
 
@@ -348,7 +348,7 @@ First, you set the storage format to JSON. Next, you use the CREATE TABLE AS (CT
         | 0_0        | 4                         |
         +------------+---------------------------+
         1 row selected (0.414 seconds)
-8. Take a look at the binary Parquet output:
+8. Take a look at the meaningless output from sqlline:
 
         SELECT * FROM tmp.`json2parquet`;
         +-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ First, you set the storage format to JSON. Next, you use the CREATE TABLE AS (CT
 
 ## STRING_BINARY function
 
-Converts a VARBINARY type into a hexadecimal-encoded string.
+Converts a VARBINARY value into a string that is its hexadecimal encoding.
 
 ### STRING_BINARY Syntax
 
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ FROM (VALUES (1));
 
 ## BINARY_STRING function
 
-Converts a hexadecimal-encoded string into a VARBINARY type. 
+Converts a string that is the hexadecimal encoding of a sequence of bytes into a VARBINARY value. 
 
 ### BINARY_STRING Syntax
 
@@ -453,11 +453,11 @@ Converts a VARBINARY type into a hexadecimal-encoded string.
 
 *expression* is a byte array, such as {(byte)0xca, (byte)0xfe, (byte)0xba, (byte)0xbe}.
 
-This function returns a hexadecimal-encoded string, such as `"\xca\xfe\xba\xbe"`. You can use this function with CONVERT_TO for readable results.
+This function returns a hexadecimal-encoded string, such as `"\xca\xfe\xba\xbe"`. You can use this function with CONVERT_TO for meaningful results.
 
 ### BINARY_STRING Examples
 
-Decode the hexadecimal string 000000C8 expressed in four octets `\x00\x00\x00\xC8` into its big endian four-byte integer equivalent. 
+Decode the hexadecimal string 000000C8 expressed in four octets `\x00\x00\x00\xC8` into an integer equivalent using big endian encoding. 
 
 ```
 SELECT CONVERT_FROM(BINARY_STRING('\x00\x00\x00\xC8'), 'INT_BE') AS cnvrt
@@ -475,7 +475,7 @@ Output is:
 1 row selected (0.133 seconds)
 ```
 
-Decode the same hexadecimal string into its little endian four-byte signed integer equivalent.
+Decode the same hexadecimal string into an integer using little endian encoding.
 
 ```
 SELECT CONVERT_FROM(BINARY_STRING('\x00\x00\x00\xC8'), 'INT') AS cnvrt FROM (VALUES (1));
@@ -610,7 +610,7 @@ You can use the ‘z’ option to identify the time zone in TO_TIMESTAMP to make
 
 Convert a FLOAT to a character string. The format specifications use a comma to separate thousands and round-off to three decimal places.
 
-    SELECT TO_CHAR(1256.789383, '#,###.###') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_CHAR(1256.789383, '#,###.###') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -620,7 +620,7 @@ Convert a FLOAT to a character string. The format specifications use a comma to
 
 Convert an integer to a character string.
 
-    SELECT TO_CHAR(125677.4567, '#,###.###') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_CHAR(125677.4567, '#,###.###') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +--------------+
     |    EXPR$0    |
     +--------------+
@@ -630,7 +630,7 @@ Convert an integer to a character string.
 
 Convert a date to a character string.
 
-    SELECT TO_CHAR((CAST('2008-2-23' AS DATE)), 'yyyy-MMM-dd') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_CHAR((CAST('2008-2-23' AS DATE)), 'yyyy-MMM-dd') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +--------------+
     |    EXPR$0    |
     +--------------+
@@ -640,7 +640,7 @@ Convert a date to a character string.
 
 Convert a time to a string.
 
-    SELECT TO_CHAR(CAST('12:20:30' AS TIME), 'HH mm ss') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_CHAR(CAST('12:20:30' AS TIME), 'HH mm ss') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -651,7 +651,7 @@ Convert a time to a string.
 
 Convert a timestamp to a string.
 
-    SELECT TO_CHAR(CAST('2015-2-23 12:00:00' AS TIMESTAMP), 'yyyy MMM dd HH:mm:ss') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_CHAR(CAST('2015-2-23 12:00:00' AS TIMESTAMP), 'yyyy MMM dd HH:mm:ss') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-----------------------+
     |        EXPR$0         |
     +-----------------------+
@@ -706,7 +706,7 @@ For example:
 ### TO_DATE Examples
 The first example converts a character string to a date. The second example extracts the year to verify that Drill recognizes the date as a date type. 
 
-    SELECT TO_DATE('2015-FEB-23', 'yyyy-MMM-dd') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_DATE('2015-FEB-23', 'yyyy-MMM-dd') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ The first example converts a character string to a date. The second example extr
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.077 seconds)
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(year from mydate) `extracted year` FROM (SELECT TO_DATE('2015-FEB-23', 'yyyy-MMM-dd') AS mydate FROM sys.version);
+    SELECT EXTRACT(year from mydate) `extracted year` FROM (SELECT TO_DATE('2015-FEB-23', 'yyyy-MMM-dd') AS mydate FROM (VALUES(1)));
 
     +------------+
     |   myyear   |
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ The first example converts a character string to a date. The second example extr
 
 The following example converts a UNIX epoch timestamp to a date.
 
-    SELECT TO_DATE(1427849046000) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_DATE(1427849046000) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -766,14 +766,14 @@ The data type of the output of TO_NUMBER is a numeric. You can use the following
 
 ### TO_NUMBER Examples
 
-    SELECT TO_NUMBER('987,966', '######') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_NUMBER('987,966', '######') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
     | 987.0      |
     +------------+
 
-    SELECT TO_NUMBER('987.966', '###.###') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_NUMBER('987.966', '###.###') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -781,7 +781,7 @@ The data type of the output of TO_NUMBER is a numeric. You can use the following
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.063 seconds)
 
-    SELECT TO_NUMBER('12345', '##0.##E0') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_NUMBER('12345', '##0.##E0') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -805,7 +805,7 @@ Specify a format using patterns defined in [Joda DateTimeFormat class](http://jo
 
 ### TO_TIME Examples
 
-    SELECT TO_TIME('12:20:30', 'HH:mm:ss') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_TIME('12:20:30', 'HH:mm:ss') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -815,7 +815,7 @@ Specify a format using patterns defined in [Joda DateTimeFormat class](http://jo
 
 Convert 828550000 milliseconds (23 hours 55 seconds) to the time.
 
-    SELECT to_time(82855000) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT to_time(82855000) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -840,7 +840,7 @@ Specify a format using patterns defined in [Joda DateTimeFormat class](http://jo
 
 Convert a date to a timestamp. 
 
-    SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP('2008-2-23 12:00:00', 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP('2008-2-23 12:00:00', 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0         |
     +------------------------+
@@ -850,7 +850,7 @@ Convert a date to a timestamp.
 
 Convert Unix Epoch time to a timestamp.
 
-    SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP(1427936330) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP(1427936330) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0         |
     +------------------------+
@@ -862,7 +862,7 @@ Convert a UTC date to a timestamp offset from the UTC time zone code.
 
     SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP('2015-03-30 20:49:59.0 UTC', 'YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.s z') AS Original, 
            TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('2015-03-30 20:49:59.0 UTC', 'YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.s z'), 'z') AS New_TZ 
-    FROM sys.version;
+    FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------------------+---------+
     |        Original        | New_TZ  |
@@ -876,7 +876,7 @@ Currently Drill does not support conversion of a date, time, or timestamp from o
 
 1. Take a look at the Drill time zone configuration by running the TIMEOFDAY function or by querying the system.options table. This TIMEOFDAY function returns the local date and time with time zone information. 
 
-        SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM (VALUES(1));
 
         +----------------------------------------------+
         |                    EXPR$0                    |
@@ -893,7 +893,7 @@ Currently Drill does not support conversion of a date, time, or timestamp from o
 
 4. Confirm that Drill is now set to UTC:
 
-        SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM (VALUES(1));
 
         +----------------------------------------------+
         |                    EXPR$0                    |
@@ -906,7 +906,7 @@ You can use the ‘z’ option to identify the time zone in TO_TIMESTAMP to make
 
     SELECT TO_TIMESTAMP('2015-03-30 20:49:59.0 UTC', 'YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.s z') AS Original, 
            TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('2015-03-30 20:49:59.0 UTC', 'YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.s z'), 'z') AS TimeZone 
-           FROM sys.version;
+           FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------------------+-----------+
     |        Original        | TimeZone  |

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/030-date-time-functions-and-arithmetic.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/030-date-time-functions-and-arithmetic.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/030-date-time-functions-and-arithmetic.md
index a03f9c7..f23da74 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/030-date-time-functions-and-arithmetic.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/030-date-time-functions-and-arithmetic.md
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ Cast string arguments to timestamp to include time data in the calculations of t
 
 Find the interval between midnight today, April 3, 2015, and June 13, 1957.
 
-    SELECT AGE('1957-06-13') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT AGE('1957-06-13') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ Find the interval between midnight today, May 21, 2015, and hire dates of employ
 
 Find the interval between 11:10:10 PM on January 1, 2001 and 10:10:10 PM on January 1, 2001.
 
-    SELECT AGE(CAST('2010-01-01 10:10:10' AS TIMESTAMP), CAST('2001-01-01 11:10:10' AS TIMESTAMP)) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT AGE(CAST('2010-01-01 10:10:10' AS TIMESTAMP), CAST('2001-01-01 11:10:10' AS TIMESTAMP)) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------+
     |      EXPR$0      |
     +------------------+
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ The following examples show how to use the syntax variations.
 
 Add two days to today's date May 15, 2015.
 
-    SELECT DATE_ADD(date '2015-05-15', 2) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_ADD(date '2015-05-15', 2) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ Add a 10 hour interval to the hire dates of employees listed in the `employee.js
 
 Add 1 year and 1 month to the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
-    SELECT DATE_ADD(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '1-2' year to month) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_ADD(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '1-2' year to month) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0         |
     +------------------------+
@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ Add 1 year and 1 month to the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
 Add 1 day 2 and 1/2 hours and 45.100 seconds to the time 22:55:55.
 
-    SELECT DATE_ADD(time '22:55:55', interval '1 2:30:45.100' day to second) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_ADD(time '22:55:55', interval '1 2:30:45.100' day to second) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +---------------+
     |    EXPR$0     |
     +---------------+
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ Use Unix Epoch timestamp in milliseconds as the expression to get the field of a
 
 ### DATE_PART Examples
 
-    SELECT DATE_PART('day', '2015-04-02') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_PART('day', '2015-04-02') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ Use Unix Epoch timestamp in milliseconds as the expression to get the field of a
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.098 seconds)
 
-    SELECT DATE_PART('hour', '23:14:30.076') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_PART('hour', '23:14:30.076') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ Use Unix Epoch timestamp in milliseconds as the expression to get the field of a
 
 Return the day part of the one year, 2 months, 10 days interval.
 
-    SELECT DATE_PART('day', '1:2:10') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_PART('day', '1:2:10') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ The following examples show how to apply the syntax variations.
 
 Subtract two days from today's date May 15, 2015.
 
-    SELECT DATE_SUB(date '2015-05-15', 2) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_SUB(date '2015-05-15', 2) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -270,7 +270,7 @@ Subtract two days from today's date May 15, 2015.
 
 Subtact two months from April 15, 2015.
 
-    SELECT DATE_SUB(date '2015-04-15', interval '2' month) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_SUB(date '2015-04-15', interval '2' month) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -282,7 +282,7 @@ Subtact two months from April 15, 2015.
 
 Subtract 10 hours from the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
-    SELECT DATE_SUB(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '10' hour) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_SUB(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '10' hour) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0         |
     +------------------------+
@@ -292,7 +292,7 @@ Subtract 10 hours from the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
 Subtract 10 hours from the time 22 hours, 55 minutes, 55 seconds.
 
-    SELECT DATE_SUB(time '22:55:55', interval '10' hour) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_SUB(time '22:55:55', interval '10' hour) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -302,7 +302,7 @@ Subtract 10 hours from the time 22 hours, 55 minutes, 55 seconds.
 
 Subtract 1 year and 1 month from the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
-    SELECT DATE_SUB(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '1-2' year to month) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_SUB(timestamp '2015-04-15 22:55:55', interval '1-2' year to month) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0         |
     +------------------------+
@@ -312,7 +312,7 @@ Subtract 1 year and 1 month from the timestamp 2015-04-15 22:55:55.
 
 Subtract 1 day, 2 and 1/2 hours, and 45.100 seconds from the time 22:55:55.
 
-    SELECT DATE_ADD(time '22:55:55', interval '1 2:30:45.100' day to second) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT DATE_ADD(time '22:55:55', interval '1 2:30:45.100' day to second) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +---------------+
     |    EXPR$0     |
     +---------------+
@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
 * NOW
 * TIMEOFDAY
 
-        SELECT CURRENT_DATE FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT CURRENT_DATE FROM (VALUES(1));
         +--------------+
         | current_date |
         +--------------+
@@ -363,7 +363,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
         +--------------+
         1 row selected (0.077 seconds)
 
-        SELECT CURRENT_TIME FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT CURRENT_TIME FROM (VALUES(1));
         +--------------+
         | current_time |
         +--------------+
@@ -371,7 +371,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
         +--------------+
         1 row selected (0.073 seconds)
 
-        SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP FROM (VALUES(1));
         +--------------------------+
         |    CURRENT_TIMESTAMP     |
         +--------------------------+
@@ -379,7 +379,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
         +--------------------------+
         1 row selected (0.109 seconds)
 
-        SELECT LOCALTIME FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT LOCALTIME FROM (VALUES(1));
 
         +---------------+
         |   LOCALTIME   |
@@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
         +---------------+
         1 row selected (0.105 seconds)
 
-        SELECT LOCALTIMESTAMP FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT LOCALTIMESTAMP FROM (VALUES(1));
 
         +--------------------------+
         |      LOCALTIMESTAMP      |
@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
         +--------------------------+
         1 row selected (0.08 seconds)
 
-        SELECT NOW() FROM sys.version;
+        SELECT NOW() FROM (VALUES(1));
         +--------------------------+
         |          EXPR$0          |
         +--------------------------+
@@ -407,7 +407,7 @@ The following examples show how to use these functions:
 
 If you set up Drill for [UTC time]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/data-type-conversion/#time-zone-limitation), TIMEOFDAY returns the result for the UTC time zone.
 
-    SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-----------------------------+
     |           EXPR$0            |
     +-----------------------------+
@@ -417,7 +417,7 @@ If you set up Drill for [UTC time]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/data-type-conversion/
 
 If you did not set up Drill for UTC time, TIMEOFDAY returns the local date and time with time zone information.
 
-    SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TIMEOFDAY() FROM (VALUES(1));
     +----------------------------------------------+
     |                    EXPR$0                    |
     +----------------------------------------------+
@@ -447,7 +447,7 @@ The extract function supports the following time units: YEAR, MONTH, DAY, HOUR,
 
 On the third day of the month, run the following function:
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(day FROM NOW()), EXTRACT(day FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(day FROM NOW()), EXTRACT(day FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |   EXPR$1   |
@@ -458,7 +458,7 @@ On the third day of the month, run the following function:
 
 At 8:00 am, extract the hour from the value of CURRENT_DATE.
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ At 8:00 am, extract the hour from the value of CURRENT_DATE.
 
 What is the hour component of this time: 17:12:28.5?
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM TIME '17:12:28.5') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM TIME '17:12:28.5') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -479,7 +479,7 @@ What is the hour component of this time: 17:12:28.5?
 
 What is the seconds component of this timestamp: 2001-02-16 20:38:40
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(SECOND FROM TIMESTAMP '2001-02-16 20:38:40') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(SECOND FROM TIMESTAMP '2001-02-16 20:38:40') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -493,7 +493,7 @@ What is the seconds component of this timestamp: 2001-02-16 20:38:40
 
 Is the day returned from the NOW function the same as the day returned from the CURRENT_DATE function?
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(day FROM NOW()) = EXTRACT(day FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(day FROM NOW()) = EXTRACT(day FROM CURRENT_DATE) FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -503,7 +503,7 @@ Is the day returned from the NOW function the same as the day returned from the
 
 Every 23 hours, a 4 hour task started. What time does the task end? 
 
-    SELECT TIME '04:00:00' + interval '23:00:00' hour to second FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TIME '04:00:00' + interval '23:00:00' hour to second FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -513,7 +513,7 @@ Every 23 hours, a 4 hour task started. What time does the task end?
 
 Is the time 2:00 PM?
 
-    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM CURRENT_DATE) = 2 FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT EXTRACT(hour FROM CURRENT_DATE) = 2 FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -538,7 +538,7 @@ These functions perform the following operations, respectively:
 * Converts the time string with the given pattern to a Unix time stamp in seconds.  
 
 ```
-SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP FROM sys.version;
+SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP() FROM (VALUES(1));
 +-------------+
 |   EXPR$0    |
 +-------------+
@@ -546,7 +546,7 @@ SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP FROM sys.version;
 +-------------+
 1 row selected (0.749 seconds)
 
-SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20 11:15:55') FROM sys.version;
+SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20 11:15:55') FROM (VALUES(1));
 +-------------+
 |   EXPR$0    |
 +-------------+
@@ -554,7 +554,7 @@ SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20 11:15:55') FROM sys.version;
 +-------------+
 1 row selected (1.848 seconds)
 
-SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20', 'yyyy-MM-dd') FROM sys.version;
+SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20', 'yyyy-MM-dd') FROM (VALUES(1));
 +-------------+
 |   EXPR$0    |
 +-------------+
@@ -562,7 +562,7 @@ SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2009-03-20', 'yyyy-MM-dd') FROM sys.version;
 +-------------+
 1 row selected (0.181 seconds)
 
-SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2015-05-29 08:18:53.0', 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS') FROM sys.version;
+SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2015-05-29 08:18:53.0', 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS') FROM (VALUES(1));
 +-------------+
 |   EXPR$0    |
 +-------------+

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/040-string-manipulation.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/040-string-manipulation.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/040-string-manipulation.md
index 4c5a09a..1245451 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/040-string-manipulation.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-functions/040-string-manipulation.md
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ You can use the alias CHARACTER_LENGTH.
 
 ### CHAR_LENGTH Example
 
-    SELECT CHAR_LENGTH('Drill rocks') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CHAR_LENGTH('Drill rocks') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ Concatenates arguments.
 
 ### CONCAT Example
 
-    SELECT CONCAT('Drill', ' ', 1.0, ' ', 'release') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT CONCAT('Drill', ' ', 1.0, ' ', 'release') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +--------------------+
     |       EXPR$0       |
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ Returns the string using initial caps.
 
 ### INITCAP Examples
 
-    SELECT INITCAP('apache drill release 1.0') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT INITCAP('apache drill release 1.0') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +---------------------------+
     |          EXPR$0           |
@@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ Returns the number of characters in the string.
 
 ### LENGTH Example
 
-    SELECT LENGTH('apache drill release 1.0') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LENGTH('apache drill release 1.0') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ Converts characters in the string to lowercase.
 
 ### LOWER Example
 
-    SELECT LOWER('Apache Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LOWER('Apache Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +---------------+
     |    EXPR$0     |
@@ -176,7 +176,7 @@ Pads the string to the length specified by prepending the fill or a space. Trunc
 
 ### LPAD Example
 
-    SELECT LPAD('Release 1.0', 27, 'of Apache Drill 1.0') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LPAD('Release 1.0', 27, 'of Apache Drill 1.0') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------------------------+
     |            EXPR$0            |
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ Removes any characters from the beginning of string1 that match the characters i
 
 ### LTRIM Examples
 
-    SELECT LTRIM('Apache Drill', 'Apache ') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LTRIM('Apache Drill', 'Apache ') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -203,7 +203,7 @@ Removes any characters from the beginning of string1 that match the characters i
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.131 seconds)
 
-    SELECT LTRIM('A powerful tool Apache Drill', 'Apache ') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT LTRIM('A powerful tool Apache Drill', 'Apache ') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +----------------------------+
     |           EXPR$0           |
@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ Returns the location of a substring.
 
 ### POSITION Example
 
-    SELECT POSITION('c' in 'Apache Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT POSITION('c' in 'Apache Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -248,7 +248,7 @@ Substitutes new text for substrings that match [POSIX regular expression pattern
 
 Replace a's with b's in this string.
 
-    SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('abc, acd, ade, aef', 'a', 'b') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('abc, acd, ade, aef', 'a', 'b') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +---------------------+
     |       EXPR$0        |
     +---------------------+
@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@ Replace a's with b's in this string.
 
 Use the regular expression *a* followed by a period (.) in the same query to replace all a's and the subsequent character.
 
-    SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('abc, acd, ade, aef', 'a.','b') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('abc, acd, ade, aef', 'a.','b') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-----------------+
     |     EXPR$0      |
     +-----------------+
@@ -277,7 +277,7 @@ Pads the string to the length specified. Appends the text you specify after the
 
 ### RPAD Example
 
-    SELECT RPAD('Apache Drill ', 22, 'Release 1.0') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT RPAD('Apache Drill ', 22, 'Release 1.0') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-------------------------+
     |         EXPR$0          |
     +-------------------------+
@@ -294,7 +294,7 @@ Removes any characters from the end of string1 that match the characters in stri
 
 ### RTRIM Examples
 
-    SELECT RTRIM('Apache Drill', 'Drill ') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT RTRIM('Apache Drill', 'Drill ') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ Removes any characters from the end of string1 that match the characters in stri
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.135 seconds)
 
-    SELECT RTRIM('1.0 Apache Tomcat 1.0', 'Drill 1.0') from sys.version;
+    SELECT RTRIM('1.0 Apache Tomcat 1.0', 'Drill 1.0') from (VALUES(1));
     +--------------------+
     |       EXPR$0       |
     +--------------------+
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ STRPOS(string, substring)
 
 ### STRPOS Example
 
-    SELECT STRPOS('Apache Drill', 'Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT STRPOS('Apache Drill', 'Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -342,7 +342,7 @@ You can use the alias SUBSTRING for this function.
 
 ### SUBSTR Example
 
-    SELECT SUBSTR('Apache Drill', 8) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT SUBSTR('Apache Drill', 8) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ You can use the alias SUBSTRING for this function.
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.134 seconds)
 
-    SELECT SUBSTR('Apache Drill', 3, 2) FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT SUBSTR('Apache Drill', 3, 2) FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ Removes any characters from the beginning, end, or both sides of string2 that ma
 
 ### TRIM Example
 
-    SELECT TRIM(trailing 'l' from 'Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TRIM(trailing 'l' from 'Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +------------+
     |   EXPR$0   |
     +------------+
@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ Removes any characters from the beginning, end, or both sides of string2 that ma
     +------------+
     1 row selected (0.172 seconds)
 
-    SELECT TRIM(both 'l' from 'long live Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TRIM(both 'l' from 'long live Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +---------------+
     |    EXPR$0     |
     +---------------+
@@ -385,7 +385,7 @@ Removes any characters from the beginning, end, or both sides of string2 that ma
     +---------------+
     1 row selected (0.104 seconds)
 
-    SELECT TRIM(leading 'l' from 'long live Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT TRIM(leading 'l' from 'long live Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
     +-----------------+
     |     EXPR$0      |
     +-----------------+
@@ -402,7 +402,7 @@ Converts characters in the string to uppercase.
 
 ### UPPER Example
 
-    SELECT UPPER('Apache Drill') FROM sys.version;
+    SELECT UPPER('Apache Drill') FROM (VALUES(1));
 
     +---------------+
     |    EXPR$0     |

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/sql-reference/sql-window-functions/040-sql-window-functions-examples.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-window-functions/040-sql-window-functions-examples.md b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-window-functions/040-sql-window-functions-examples.md
index 580b107..570a6cc 100644
--- a/_docs/sql-reference/sql-window-functions/040-sql-window-functions-examples.md
+++ b/_docs/sql-reference/sql-window-functions/040-sql-window-functions-examples.md
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ The emp_sales.csv file contains the following information:
        +-----------------+-----------------+------------+--------+
 You can create a CSV file named emp_sales with this data.
 
-Drill was installed locally and a workspace was created in the dfs storage plugin instance for the directory where the emp_sales.csv file is located. See [Installing Drill](https://drill.apache.org/docs/embedded-mode-prerequisites/).
+Drill was installed locally and a workspace was created in the `dfs` storage plugin configuration for the directory where the emp_sales.csv file is located. See [Installing Drill](https://drill.apache.org/docs/embedded-mode-prerequisites/).
  
 If you create a CSV file with the data provided, you can create workspace that points to the directory where you store the emp_sales.csv file. See [Configuring Storage Plugins](https://drill.apache.org/docs/file-system-storage-plugin/).
  

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/tutorials/020-drill-in-10-minutes.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/tutorials/020-drill-in-10-minutes.md b/_docs/tutorials/020-drill-in-10-minutes.md
index cbc1a62..3cfe4e4 100755
--- a/_docs/tutorials/020-drill-in-10-minutes.md
+++ b/_docs/tutorials/020-drill-in-10-minutes.md
@@ -111,8 +111,7 @@ Issue the following command when you want to exit the Drill shell:
 ## Query Sample Data
 
 Your Drill installation includes a `sample-data` directory with JSON and
-Parquet files that you can query. The local file system on your machine is
-configured as the `dfs` storage plugin instance by default when you install
+Parquet files that you can query. The default `dfs` storage plugin configuration represents the local file system on your machine when you install
 Drill in embedded mode. For more information about storage plugin
 configuration, refer to [Storage Plugin Registration]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/connect-a-data-source-introduction).
 

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/tutorials/030-analyzing-the-yelp-academic-dataset.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/tutorials/030-analyzing-the-yelp-academic-dataset.md b/_docs/tutorials/030-analyzing-the-yelp-academic-dataset.md
index 308c8c3..4a0b6aa 100644
--- a/_docs/tutorials/030-analyzing-the-yelp-academic-dataset.md
+++ b/_docs/tutorials/030-analyzing-the-yelp-academic-dataset.md
@@ -8,8 +8,7 @@ latency performance at scale, Drill allows users to analyze the data without
 any ETL or up-front schema definitions. The data can be in any file format
 such as text, JSON, or Parquet. Data can have simple types such as strings,
 integers, dates, or more complex multi-structured data, such as nested maps and
-arrays. Data can exist in any file system, local or distributed, such as HDFS,
-MapR FS, or S3. Drill, has a “no schema” approach, which enables you to get
+arrays. Data can exist in any file system, local or distributed, such as HDFS or S3. Drill, has a “no schema” approach, which enables you to get
 value from your data in just a few minutes.
 
 Let’s quickly walk through the steps required to install Drill and run it

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/drill/blob/53008ee1/_docs/tutorials/learn-drill-with-the-mapr-sandbox/020-getting-to-know-the-drill-sandbox.md
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/_docs/tutorials/learn-drill-with-the-mapr-sandbox/020-getting-to-know-the-drill-sandbox.md b/_docs/tutorials/learn-drill-with-the-mapr-sandbox/020-getting-to-know-the-drill-sandbox.md
index 5625b30..d3b4994 100755
--- a/_docs/tutorials/learn-drill-with-the-mapr-sandbox/020-getting-to-know-the-drill-sandbox.md
+++ b/_docs/tutorials/learn-drill-with-the-mapr-sandbox/020-getting-to-know-the-drill-sandbox.md
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ The control panel for managing storage plugins appears.
 
 ![sandbox plugin]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/img/get2kno_plugin.png)
 
-You see the following storage plugin controls:
+You see the following storage plugin configurations:
 
 * cp
 * dfs
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ You see the following storage plugin controls:
 
 Click Update to examine a configuration. 
 
-If you've used an installation of Drill before using the sandbox, you might notice that a few storage plugins in the sandbox differ from the same storage plugin in a Drill installation. The sandbox version of dfs, hive, maprdb, and hbase storage plugins definitions play a role in simulating the cluster environment for running the tutorial. 
+If you've used an installation of Drill before using the sandbox, you might notice that a few storage plugin configurations in the sandbox differ from the same storage plugin configurations in a Drill installation. The sandbox configurations of dfs, hive, maprdb, and hbase storage plugins definitions play a role in simulating the cluster environment for running the tutorial. 
 
 ### dfs
 
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ location in MapR-FS:
   * logs: access to flat (non-nested) JSON log data in the logs directory and its subdirectories
   * views: a workspace for creating views
 
-The `dfs` definition includes format definitions.
+The `dfs` configuration includes format definitions.
 
     {
       "type": "file",
@@ -91,11 +91,11 @@ The `dfs` definition includes format definitions.
 
 ### maprdb
 
-The maprdb format is a configuration for MapR-DB in the sandbox. You use this format in the sandbox to query MapR-DB/HBase tables. 
+The maprdb is a configuration for MapR-DB in the sandbox. You use this format in the sandbox to query MapR-DB/HBase tables. 
 
 ### hive
 
-The hive storage plugin is a configuration for a Hive data warehouse within the sandbox.
+The hive configuration for a Hive data warehouse within the sandbox.
 Drill connects to the Hive metastore by using the configured metastore thrift
 URI. Metadata for Hive tables is automatically available for users to query.
 
@@ -108,22 +108,7 @@ URI. Metadata for Hive tables is automatically available for users to query.
       }
     }
 
-## Use Case Overview
-
-This section describes the use case that serves as the basis for the tutorial. Imagine being an analyst with basic SQL skills who works for an
-emerging online retail business. The business accepts purchases from its customers
-through both an established web-based interface and a new mobile application.
-
-Your job is data-driven and independent with little or no interaction with the IT department. Recently the central IT team
-has implemented a Hadoop-based infrastructure to reduce the cost of the legacy
-database system, and most of the DWH/ETL workload is now handled by
-Hadoop/Hive. MapR-DB manages the master customer profile information and product catalog. MapR-DB is a NoSQL database. The IT team has also started
-acquiring clickstream data that comes from web and mobile applications. This
-data is stored in Hadoop as JSON files.
-
-You have a number of data sources to explore.  For example, analyzing customer records in the clickstream data and tying them to the master customer data in MapR-DB might yield some potentially interesting analytical connections. You decide to explore various data sources by using Apache Drill. You need Apache Drill to provide flexibility and analytic capability.
-
-# What's Next
+## What's Next
 
 Start running queries by going to [Lesson 1: Learn About the Data
 Set]({{ site.baseurl }}/docs/lesson-1-learn-about-the-data-set).


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