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From <de...@segel.com>
Subject RE: Using Derby as a binary store
Date Tue, 28 Nov 2006 14:18:59 GMT
Hey!

Sorry about that.
For some reason my Thinkpad's outlook got a bit garbled on thinking that my
outbound SMTP server required an SSL. (It doesn't. It will only accept
connections from within my network.)

So This got sent as I unclogged it.

Please ignore cause this thread is old....

-Mike

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike [mailto:msegel@segel.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 8:12 AM
> To: 'Derby Discussion'
> Subject: RE: Using Derby as a binary store
> 
> 
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Paul J DeCoursey [mailto:paul@decoursey.net]
> > Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 7:45 AM
> > To: Derby Discussion
> > Subject: Re: Using Derby as a binary store
> >
> > derby@segel.com wrote:
> > > [mjs]
> > > The simplest path would be to write his own from scratch.
> > > The questions that haven't been asked:
> > > 1) Are there other pieces of the application that may benefit from
> being
> > in
> > > a relational database.
> > > 2) What is the use case of the application? And what are the future
> > > enhancements that are already planned?
> > >
> > >
> > > That should be your driving reason for using a database. Choosing a
> > database
> > > that doesn't support the data type you wish to use would mean 1)
> Either
> > a
> > > rethink of your application to use a different solution so that it
> would
> > map
> > > to the database better. Or 2) Choose a more appropriate storage model
> > What is this binary data you are storing?  Have you looked at
> > Jackrabbit? Have you thought about just using java.nio and perhaps
> > Lucene fro indexing? Definitely consider the above questions as well,
> > look at the bigger picture.
> >
> > Paul
> 
> Paul,
> It wasn't my question.
> 
> I was responding to the earlier thread.
> 
> Hand coding or using freely available tools is up to the user and their
> personal preference.
> 
> For example, I wrote my own calendar DB and surrounding app. I could have
> used one that was freely available, but since I wanted a custom look and
> feel, plus my own hooks in to my app framework, it was just as easy for me
> to do this on my own.
> 
> When designing custom apps, its sometimes easier, efficient, and frankly
> more fun when you develop your own code, rather than try to make a "free"
> package fit your needs.
> 
> The question at hand wasn't about which other off topic tool to choose,
> but
> whether or not to choose derby.
> 
> Since Derby doesn't support the Boolean data type and he doesn't see value
> elsewhere in his app for a relational database store, then he should look
> elsewhere.
> 
> 
> 




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