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From Michael Segel <mse...@segel.com>
Subject Re: Derby and Hibernate?
Date Wed, 07 Dec 2005 16:37:12 GMT
All,

Sorry for the double post. Seems my earlier message did go through. Just got 
caught up in the  queue.

On Wednesday 07 December 2005 6:41 am, Michael Segel wrote:
> FYI, there was an interesting article in the Register yesterday about
> Hibernate.
>
>
>
> I'm pretty sure that there are a "couple" of people using Hibernate on this
> list.
>
>
>
> Just out of curiosity, I was wondering how many people are using Hibernate
> and Derby
>
> (Please send me an e-mail, don't post a reply to the list.)
>
>
>
> I am curious because if you took advantage of the meta data provided by
> JDBC, Hibernate seems inefficient.
>
> (Maybe it is for the simple example that they used.)
>
>
>
> Since the article used an extremely simplified example, single table with a
> couple of columns, how does hibernate stack up when you have a more complex
> real world example like an invoice?
>
>
>
> The example I am thinking of is creating an "invoice bean" where you have
> your customer information coming from the customer table, order header
> information from the order_hdr table, and then the order detail coming from
> the order_dtl table (one to many relationship with order keyed on the
> order_id column).
>
>
>
> In this example, you'd want to use at least a vector to represent the order
> detail lines since you can have 1 to n  different items in an order.
>
>
>
> Many moons ago, (like 5 years ago), I solved this problem by creating a set
> of database object classes (two actually) that the business objects could
> extend or instantiate.
>
>
>
> Just trying to figure out any advantage to Hibernate over writing a couple
> of simple classes and then taking advantage of JDBC's meta data.
>
>
>
> Again, please e-mail me instead of replying to the list.
>
>
>
> TIA!
>
>
>
> -M

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