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From "Kristian Waagan (JIRA)" <j...@apache.org>
Subject [jira] [Commented] (DERBY-4279) Statement cache deadlock
Date Wed, 25 Jul 2012 13:40:35 GMT

    [ https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/DERBY-4279?page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:comment-tabpanel&focusedCommentId=13422261#comment-13422261
] 

Kristian Waagan commented on DERBY-4279:
----------------------------------------

>From what I can see, the lock, which is a "container intention read lock" (CIS), is released
as soon as the controller is closed. I observed this by tracing the locks (derby.debug.true=LockTrace
+ a custom message to the log to navigate in derby.log). This is a very short time-span, and
it happens independently of the isolation level of the transaction (separate sub-transaction
for compilation?). Once my test-run has completed I will commit the patch.

If we observe the deadlock also when the mode is DDL_MODE I don't see why we can't use NO_LOCK
in all cases, since the code appears to be prepared to handle that the conglomerate is dropped
under its feet. However, it seems safer to me to keep the change minimal for the time being.
                
> Statement cache deadlock
> ------------------------
>
>                 Key: DERBY-4279
>                 URL: https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/DERBY-4279
>             Project: Derby
>          Issue Type: Bug
>          Components: SQL
>    Affects Versions: 10.0.2.1, 10.1.3.1, 10.2.2.0, 10.3.3.0, 10.4.2.0, 10.5.1.1, 10.8.1.2
>         Environment: Windows Vista, OS X 10.5+
>            Reporter: Jeff Stuckman
>              Labels: derby_triage10_5_2
>         Attachments: Derby4279.java, client_stacktrace_activation_closed.txt, no-lock-experiment.diff,
patch4279.txt, patch4279_2.txt, stacktrace.txt
>
>
> Due to a design flaw in the statement cache, a deadlock can occur if a prepared statement
becomes out-of-date.
> I will illustrate this with the following example:
> The application is using the embedded Derby driver. The application has two threads,
and each thread uses its own connection.
> There is a table named MYTABLE with column MYCOLUMN.
> 1. A thread prepares and executes the query SELECT MYCOLUMN FROM MYTABLE. The prepared
statement is stored in the statement cache (see org.apache.derby.impl.sql.GenericStatement
for this logic)
> 2. After some time, the prepared statement becomes invalid or out-of-date for some reason
(see org.apache.derby.impl.sql.GenericPreparedStatement)
> 3. Thread 1 begins a transaction and executes LOCK TABLE MYTABLE IN EXCLUSIVE MODE
> 4. Thread 2 begins a transaction and executes SELECT MYCOLUMN FROM MYTABLE. The statement
is in the statement cache but it is out-of-date. The thread begins to recompile the statement.
To compile the statement, the thread needs a shared lock on MYTABLE. Thread 1 already has
an exclusive lock on MYTABLE. Thread 2 waits.
> 5. Thread 1 executes SELECT MYCOLUMN FROM MYTABLE. The statement is in the statement
cache but it is being compiled. Thread 1 waits on the statement's monitor.
> 6. We have a deadlock. Derby eventually detects a lock timeout, but the error message
is not descriptive. The stacks at the time of the deadlock are:
> This deadlock is unique because it can still occur in a properly designed database. You
are only safe if all of your transactions are very simple and cannot be interleaved in a sequence
that causes the deadlock, or if your particular statements do not require a table lock to
compile. (For the sake of simplicity, I used LOCK TABLE in my example, but any UPDATE statement
would fit.)

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