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From "Rick Hillegas (JIRA)" <j...@apache.org>
Subject [jira] Resolved: (DERBY-4714) Clean up some edge-case uses of the BOOLEAN keyword
Date Fri, 25 Jun 2010 16:53:51 GMT

     [ https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/DERBY-4714?page=com.atlassian.jira.plugin.system.issuetabpanels:all-tabpanel
]

Rick Hillegas resolved DERBY-4714.
----------------------------------

    Issue & fix info:   (was: [Patch Available])
       Fix Version/s: 10.7.0.0
          Resolution: Fixed

Committed patch at subversion revision 958025.

> Clean up some edge-case uses of the BOOLEAN keyword
> ---------------------------------------------------
>
>                 Key: DERBY-4714
>                 URL: https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/DERBY-4714
>             Project: Derby
>          Issue Type: Improvement
>          Components: SQL
>    Affects Versions: 10.6.1.0
>            Reporter: Rick Hillegas
>            Assignee: Rick Hillegas
>             Fix For: 10.7.0.0
>
>         Attachments: derby-4714-01-aa-cleanup.diff
>
>
> The grammar allows almost any datatype to appear in XMLSERIALIZE statements and GRANT/REVOKE
EXECUTE ON FUNCTION statements. Right now, the following are legal Derby statements:
> select xmlserialize( a as int ) from t;
> grant execute on function f( int ) to public;
> revoke execute on function f( int ) from public restrict;
> However, you cannot use BOOLEAN in these contexts. The following statements raise parser
errors:
> select xmlserialize( a as boolean ) from t;
> grant execute on function f( boolean ) to public;
> revoke execute on function f( boolean ) from public restrict;
> We should be able to use BOOLEAN in these contexts just like other Derby datatypes. This
won't actually enable any functionality. It will just make Derby's handling of datatypes more
consistent. For instance, the following two statement should both raise a bind-time error
because only string types are allowed as targets of the XMLSERIALIZE operator:
> select xmlserialize( a as int ) from t;
> select xmlserialize( a as boolean ) from t;
> And there is no difference between the following statements because Derby does not support
overloading of routine signatures today. In fact, the second usage is not even documented
in the Reference Guide:
> grant execute on function f to public;
> grant execute on function f( boolean ) to public;

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