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From j..@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r159660 - in incubator/derby/site/trunk: build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml
Date Fri, 01 Apr 2005 03:34:52 GMT
Author: jta
Date: Thu Mar 31 19:34:52 2005
New Revision: 159660

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs?view=rev&rev=159660
Log:
DERBY-192: Added Mamta's modifications to JDBCImplementation.html.

Modified:
    incubator/derby/site/trunk/build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html
    incubator/derby/site/trunk/src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml

Modified: incubator/derby/site/trunk/build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/incubator/derby/site/trunk/build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html?view=diff&r1=159659&r2=159660
==============================================================================
--- incubator/derby/site/trunk/build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html (original)
+++ incubator/derby/site/trunk/build/site/papers/JDBCImplementation.html Thu Mar 31 19:34:52
2005
@@ -207,6 +207,9 @@
 <a href="#deleteRow%28%29">deleteRow()</a>
 </li>
 <li>
+<a href="#updateRow%28%29">updateRow()</a>
+</li>
+<li>
 <a href="#GetAsciiStream%28%29">GetAsciiStream()</a>
 </li>
 <li>
@@ -336,7 +339,11 @@
 <h3 class="boxed">deleteRow()</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>After deleteRow, ResultSet will be positioned right before the next row for FORWARD
ONLY updatable ResultSets.</p>
-<a name="N1007E"></a><a name="GetAsciiStream%28%29"></a>
+<a name="N1007E"></a><a name="updateRow%28%29"></a>
+<h3 class="boxed">updateRow()</h3>
+<p>Behavior Clarification</p>
+<p>After updateRow, ResultSet will be positioned right before th next row for FORWARD
ONLY updatable ResultSets.</p>
+<a name="N10086"></a><a name="GetAsciiStream%28%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">GetAsciiStream()</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>An ASCII character is defined as an eight bit character (range 0x00 to 0xff), see
CHAR() function definition by [JDBC3] in appendix C.2.</p>
@@ -353,11 +360,11 @@
 <p>On Types.BLOB columns returns a stream with identical contents to that returned
by getBlob().getBinaryStream() on the same column if the BLOB value is not NULL. If the BLOB
value is NULL then null is returned.</p>
 </li>
 </ul>
-<a name="N10094"></a><a name="GetBinaryStream%28%29"></a>
+<a name="N1009C"></a><a name="GetBinaryStream%28%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">GetBinaryStream()</h3>
 <p>Extensions</p>
 <p>On Types.BLOB columns returns a stream with identical contents to that returned
by getBlob().getBinaryStream() on the same column if the BLOB value is not NULL. If the BLOB
value is NULL then null is returned.</p>
-<a name="N1009C"></a><a name="GetCharacterStream%28%29"></a>
+<a name="N100A4"></a><a name="GetCharacterStream%28%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">GetCharacterStream()</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>For binary types (Types.BINARY, Types.VARBINARY, and Types.LONGVARBINARY, Types.BLOB)
getString() the value is converted to a stream of characters as though it is encoded using
UTF-16BE.</p>
@@ -372,7 +379,7 @@
 <p>On Types.BLOB columns supported with conversion as a binary type.</p>
 </li>
 </ul>
-<a name="N100AE"></a><a name="GetString%28%29"></a>
+<a name="N100B6"></a><a name="GetString%28%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">GetString()</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>For binary types (Types.BINARY, Types.VARBINARY, and Types.LONGVARBINARY, Types.BLOB)
getString() returns String containing a two character hexadecimal representation for every
byte in a non-null value.&nbsp; The two characters are in the range &lsquo;0&rsquo;
&ndash; &lsquo;9&rsquo; and &lsquo;a&rsquo; &ndash; &lsquo;f&rsquo;.
For NULL values, null is returned. Note, that this String does not match the contents of the
stream returned by getAsciiStream or getCharacterStream on the same column.</p>
@@ -387,10 +394,10 @@
 <p>On Types.BLOB columns supported with conversion as a binary type.</p>
 </li>
 </ul>
-<a name="N100C0"></a><a name="GetUnicodeStream%28%29"></a>
+<a name="N100C8"></a><a name="GetUnicodeStream%28%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">GetUnicodeStream()</h3>
 <p>Not implemented, deprecated by [JDBC3].</p>
-<a name="N100C6"></a><a name="Examples"></a>
+<a name="N100CE"></a><a name="Examples"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">Examples</h3>
 <p>Binary Column</p>
 <p>If a binary column has been set with the Java byte array containing fours bytes,
byte[] data = {0x34, 0x87, 0xc2, 0x1f} then:</p>
@@ -413,43 +420,43 @@
 </li>
 </ul>
 </div>
-<a name="N100DD"></a><a name="java.sql.Blob"></a>
+<a name="N100E5"></a><a name="java.sql.Blob"></a>
 <h2 class="boxed">java.sql.Blob</h2>
 <div class="section">
-<a name="N100E1"></a><a name="getBytes%28int+pos%2C+int+length%29"></a>
+<a name="N100E9"></a><a name="getBytes%28int+pos%2C+int+length%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">getBytes(int pos, int length)</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>If the pos (position) argument is greater than the length of the BLOB then an exception
is thrown. This matches the semantics of the SQL SUBSTR function.</p>
-<a name="N100E9"></a><a name="position%28byte+pattern%2C+int+start%29+andand+position%28Blob+pattern%2C+int+start%29"></a>
+<a name="N100F1"></a><a name="position%28byte+pattern%2C+int+start%29+andand+position%28Blob+pattern%2C+int+start%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">position(byte pattern, int start) andand position(Blob pattern, int
start)</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>If the pattern argument has length zero, then the value of start argument will be
returned. This matches the semantics of the SQL LOCATE function.</p>
 </div>
-<a name="N100F1"></a><a name="java.sql.Clob"></a>
+<a name="N100F9"></a><a name="java.sql.Clob"></a>
 <h2 class="boxed">java.sql.Clob</h2>
 <div class="section">
-<a name="N100F5"></a><a name="getSubString%28int+pos%2C+int+length%29"></a>
+<a name="N100FD"></a><a name="getSubString%28int+pos%2C+int+length%29"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">getSubString(int pos, int length)</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>If the pos (position) argument is greater than the length of the CLOB then an exception
is thrown. This matches the semantics of the SQL SUBSTR function.</p>
-<a name="N100FD"></a><a name="position%28String+searchstr%2C+int+start%29+and"></a>
+<a name="N10105"></a><a name="position%28String+searchstr%2C+int+start%29+and"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">position(String searchstr, int start) andposition(Clob searchstr,
int start)</h3>
 <p>Behavior Clarification</p>
 <p>If the searchstr argument has length zero (the empty string), then the value of
start argument will be returned. This matches the semantics of the SQL LOCATE function.</p>
 </div>
-<a name="N10107"></a><a name="Date+Handling"></a>
+<a name="N1010F"></a><a name="Date+Handling"></a>
 <h2 class="boxed">Date Handling</h2>
 <div class="section">
-<a name="N1010B"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+DATE"></a>
+<a name="N10113"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+DATE"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">Derby SQL DATE</h3>
 <p>Derby&rsquo;s SQL DATE type represents a date in the form yyyy-mm-dd with no
associated time zone information.</p>
-<a name="N10111"></a><a name="java.sql.Date"></a>
+<a name="N10119"></a><a name="java.sql.Date"></a>
 <h4>java.sql.Date</h4>
 <p>A JDBC Date (java.sql.Date) by definition represents a point in time on a given
date in a given time zone.</p>
 <p>[JDBC3] intends that the point in time for a java.sql.Date object is 00:00 (midnight),
but this is not enforced by the class.</p>
 <p>JDBC drivers are required to return java.sql.Date objects that are normalized to
00:00 according to the required time zone.</p>
 <p>Applications are expected to pass in java.sql.Date instances that are normalized
to 00:00 (see section 18.1.1 of [TUTORIAL3]).</p>
-<a name="N1011D"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date+to+a+Derby+DATE+value"></a>
+<a name="N10125"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date+to+a+Derby+DATE+value"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a JDBC java.sql.Date to a Derby DATE value</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -480,7 +487,7 @@
 </ol>
 <p>Derby does not require that the application&rsquo;s java.sql.Date value is normalized
to 00:00 according to the required time zone.</p>
 <p>In both cases no time zone information is stored with the SQL DATE value.</p>
-<a name="N10145"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+DATE+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date"></a>
+<a name="N1014D"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+DATE+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a Derby DATE value to a JDBC java.sql.Date</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -506,7 +513,7 @@
 </ul>
 </li>
 </ol>
-<a name="N1015E"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date"></a>
+<a name="N10166"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Date"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a string type to a JDBC java.sql.Date</h4>
 <p>Three different date formats are built into Derby.</p>
 <ol>
@@ -522,16 +529,16 @@
 </ol>
 <p>If the format of the string matches one of the built in formats then a conversion
to a java.sql.Date matches that of a SQL DATE value with value yyyy-mm-dd.</p>
 <p>If the string does not match any of the built in formats Derby attempts to use the
Java locale specific parser to interpret the string as a date.</p>
-<a name="N10172"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+TIME"></a>
+<a name="N1017A"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+TIME"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">Derby SQL TIME</h3>
 <p>Derby&rsquo;s SQL TIME type represents a time of day in the form hh:mm:ss with
no associated time zone information.</p>
-<a name="N10178"></a><a name="java.sql.Time"></a>
+<a name="N10180"></a><a name="java.sql.Time"></a>
 <h4>java.sql.Time</h4>
 <p>A JDBC Time (java.sql.Time) by definition represents a point in time on an unspecified
day in a given time zone.</p>
 <p>Java.sql.Time extends java.util.date, so it includes a date. [JDBC3] intends that
the date stored in a java.sql.Time be Jan 1 1970, but this is not enforced by the class.</p>
 <p>JDBC drivers are required to return java.sql.Time objects that are normalized to
Jan. 1 1970 according to the required time zone.</p>
 <p>Applications are expected to pass in java.sql.Time instances that are normalized
to Jan. 1 1970.</p>
-<a name="N10184"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time+to+a+Derby+TIME+value"></a>
+<a name="N1018C"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time+to+a+Derby+TIME+value"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a JDBC java.sql.Time to a Derby TIME value</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -562,7 +569,7 @@
 </ol>
 <p>Derby does not require that the application&rsquo;s java.sql.Time value be normalized
to Jan 1 1970 according to the required time zone.</p>
 <p>In both cases no time zone information is stored with the SQL TIME value.</p>
-<a name="N101AC"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+TIME+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time"></a>
+<a name="N101B4"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+TIME+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a Derby TIME value to a JDBC java.sql.Time</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -588,7 +595,7 @@
 </ul>
 </li>
 </ol>
-<a name="N101C5"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time"></a>
+<a name="N101CD"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Time"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a string type to a JDBC java.sql.Time</h4>
 <p>Three different time formats are built into Derby:</p>
 <ol>
@@ -604,13 +611,13 @@
 </ol>
 <p>If the format of the string matches one of the built in formats then a conversion
to a java.sql.Time matches that of a SQL TIME value with value hh:mm:ss.</p>
 <p>If the string does not match any of the built in formats Derby attempts to use the
Java locale specific parser to interpret the string as a date.</p>
-<a name="N101D9"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+TIMESTAMP"></a>
+<a name="N101E1"></a><a name="Derby+SQL+TIMESTAMP"></a>
 <h3 class="boxed">Derby SQL TIMESTAMP</h3>
 <p>Derby&rsquo;s SQL TIMESTAMP type represents a time of day in the form yyyy-mm-dd
hh:mm:ss.fffffffff (nanosecond granularity) with no associated time zone information.</p>
-<a name="N101DF"></a><a name="java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
+<a name="N101E7"></a><a name="java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
 <h4>java.sql.Timestamp</h4>
 <p>A JDBC Timestamp (java.sql.Timestamp) by definition represents a point in time,
with nanosecond resolution, in a given time zone.</p>
-<a name="N101E5"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp+to+a+Derby+TIMESTAMP+value"></a>
+<a name="N101ED"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp+to+a+Derby+TIMESTAMP+value"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a JDBC java.sql.Timestamp to a Derby TIMESTAMP value</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -639,7 +646,7 @@
 </ul>
 </li>
 </ol>
-<a name="N10211"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+TIMESTAMP+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
+<a name="N10219"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+Derby+TIMESTAMP+value+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a Derby TIMESTAMP value to a JDBC java.sql.Timestamp</h4>
 <ol>
 <li>
@@ -665,7 +672,7 @@
 </ul>
 </li>
 </ol>
-<a name="N1022A"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
+<a name="N10232"></a><a name="Conversion+of+a+string+type+to+a+JDBC+java.sql.Timestamp"></a>
 <h4>Conversion of a string type to a JDBC java.sql.Timestamp</h4>
 <p>Two different timestamp formats are built into Derby:</p>
 <ol>
@@ -680,7 +687,7 @@
 <p>If the format of the string matches one of the built in formats then a conversion
to a java.sql.Timestamp matches that of a SQL TIMESTAMP value with value yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.ffffff.</p>
 <p>If the string does not match any of the built in formats Derby attempts to use the
Java locale specific parser to interpret the string as a date.</p>
 <p>
-<em>Last Updated: January 17, 2005</em>
+<em>Last Updated: March 31, 2005</em>
 </p>
 </div>
 </div>

Modified: incubator/derby/site/trunk/src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/incubator/derby/site/trunk/src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml?view=diff&r1=159659&r2=159660
==============================================================================
--- incubator/derby/site/trunk/src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml
(original)
+++ incubator/derby/site/trunk/src/documentation/content/xdocs/papers/JDBCImplementation.ihtml
Thu Mar 31 19:34:52 2005
@@ -65,6 +65,13 @@
 After deleteRow, ResultSet will be positioned right before the next row for FORWARD ONLY
updatable ResultSets. 
 </P>
 
+<H2>updateRow()</H2>
+
+<P>Behavior Clarification</P>
+<P>
+After updateRow, ResultSet will be positioned right before th next row for FORWARD ONLY updatable
ResultSets. 
+</P>
+
 <H2>GetAsciiStream()</H2>
 <P>Behavior Clarification</P>
 <P>An ASCII character is defined as an eight bit character (range
@@ -474,6 +481,6 @@
 attempts to use the Java locale specific parser to interpret the
 string as a date. 
 </P>
-<P><EM>Last Updated: January 17, 2005</EM></P>
+<P><EM>Last Updated: March 31, 2005</EM></P>
 </BODY>
 </HTML>



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