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From dk...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1018111 [9/33] - in /websites/production/cxf/content: ./ cache/ docs/
Date Wed, 13 Sep 2017 15:05:57 GMT
Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-consumer.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-consumer.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-consumer.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,8 +32,8 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushBash.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Developing a Consumer
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><h1 id="DevelopingaConsumer-DevelopingaConsumerwithCXF">Developing a Consumer with CXF</h1><h2 id="DevelopingaConsumer-GeneratingtheStubCode">Generating the Stub Code</h2><p>The starting point for developing a service consumer (or client) in CXF is a WSDL contract, complete with port type, binding, and service definitions. You can then use the <a shape="rect" href="wsdl-to-java.html">wsdl2java</a> utility to generate the Java stub code from the WSDL contract. The stub code provides the supporting code that is required to invoke operations on the remote service.<br clear="none"> For CXF clients, the wsdl2java utility can generate the following kinds of code:</p><ul><li>Stub code - supporting files for implementing a CXF client.</li><li>Client starting point code - sample client code that connects to the remote service and invokes every operation on the remote service.</li><li>Ant build file - a <code>build.xml</code> file intended for use with the ant buil
 d utility. It has targets for building and for running the sample client application.</li></ul><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-BasicHelloWorldWSDLcontract">Basic HelloWorld WSDL contract</h4><p>The below shows the HelloWorld WSDL contract. This contract defines a single port type, <code>Greeter</code>, with a SOAP binding, <code>Greeter_SOAPBinding</code>, and a service, <code>SOAPService</code>, which has a single port, <code>SoapPort</code>.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example1"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>HelloWorld WSDL Contract</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;wsdl:definitions name="HelloWorld" targetNamespace="http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http" 
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;wsdl:definitions name="HelloWorld" targetNamespace="http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http" 
     xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" 
     xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/" 
     xmlns:tns="http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http"
@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Developing a Consumer
     </code> target namespace. All of the WSDL entities defined in this target namespace (for example, the Greeter port type and the SOAPService service) map to Java classes in the corresponding Java package.</li><li><code>org.apache.hello_world_soap_http.types</code> <br clear="none"> This package name is generated from the <code>
       <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http/types">http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http/types</a>
     </code> target namespace. All of the XML types defined in this target namespace (that is, everything defined in the <code>wsdl:types</code> element of the HelloWorld contract) map to Java classes in the corresponding Java package.</li></ul><p>The stub files generated by the wsdl2java command fall into the following categories:</p><ul><li>Classes representing WSDL entities (in the <code>org.apache.hello_world_soap_http</code> package) - the following classes are generated to represent WSDL entities:<ul><li><code>Greeter</code> is a Java interface that represents the Greeter WSDL port type. In JAX-WS terminology, this Java interface is a service endpoint interface.</li><li><code>SOAPService</code> is a Java class that represents the SOAPService WSDL <code>service</code> element.</li><li><code>PingMeFault</code> is a Java exception class (extending <code>java.lang.Exception</code>) that represents the pingMeFault WSDL <code>fault</code> element.</li></ul></li><li>Classes representi
 ng XML types (in the <code>org.apache.hello_world_soap_http.types</code> package) - in the HelloWorld example, the only generated types are the various wrappers for the request and reply messages. Some of these data types are useful for the<br clear="none"> asynchronous invocation model.</li></ul><h2 id="DevelopingaConsumer-ImplementingaCXFClient">Implementing a CXF Client</h2><p>This section describes how to write the code for a simple Java client, based on the WSDL contract <a shape="rect" href="developing-a-consumer.html">above</a>. To implement the client, you need to use the following stub classes:</p><ul><li>Service class (that is, <code>SOAPService</code>).</li><li>Service endpoint interface (that is, <code>Greeter</code>).</li></ul><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Generatedserviceclass">Generated service class</h4><p>The below shows the typical outline for a generated service class, <code>ServiceName</code>, which extends the <code>javax.xml.ws.Service</code> base class.</p><p><s
 pan class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example2"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Outline of a Generated Service Class</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">public class ServiceName extends javax.xml.ws.Service
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class ServiceName extends javax.xml.ws.Service
 {
   ...
   public ServiceName(URL wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) { }
@@ -306,7 +306,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Developing a Consumer
 </div></div><p>The <code>ServiceName</code> class defines the following methods:</p><ul><li>Constructor methods - the following forms of constructor are defined:<ul><li><code>
           <em>ServiceName</em>(URL <em>wsdlLocation</em>, QName <em>serviceName</em>)</code> constructs a service object based on the data in the <em>serviceName</em> service in the WSDL contract that is obtainable from <em>wsdlLocation</em>.</li><li><code>
           <em>ServiceName</em>()</code> is the default constructor, which constructs a service object based on the service name and WSDL contract that were provided at the time the stub code was generated (for example, when running the CXF wsdl2java command). Using this constructor presupposes that the WSDL contract remains available at its original location.</li></ul></li><li><code>get_PortName_()</code> methods - for every <em>PortName</em> port defined on the <em>ServiceName</em> service, CXF generates a corresponding <code>get_PortName_()</code> method in Java. Therefore, a <code>wsdl:service</code> element that defines multiple ports will generate a service class with multiple <code>get_PortName_()</code> methods.</li></ul><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Serviceendpointinterface">Service endpoint interface</h4><p>For every port type defined in the original WSDL contract, you can generate a corresponding service endpoint interface in Java. A service endpoint interface is the Java ma
 pping of a WSDL port type. Each operation defined in the original WSDL port type maps to a corresponding method in the service endpoint interface. The operation's parameters are mapped as follows:</p><ol><li>The input parameters are mapped to method arguments.</li><li>The first output parameter is mapped to a return value.</li><li>If there is more than one output parameter, the second and subsequent output parameters map to method arguments (moreover, the values of these arguments must be passed using Holder types).</li></ol><p>For example, the below shows the Greeter service endpoint interface, which is generated from the Greeter port type defined in <a shape="rect" href="developing-a-consumer.html">#Example1</a>. For simplicity, <a shape="rect" href="developing-a-consumer.html">#Example3</a> omits the standard JAXB and JAX-WS annotations.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example3"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><
 div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>The Greeter Service Endpoint Interface</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">/* Generated by WSDLToJava Compiler. */
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">/* Generated by WSDLToJava Compiler. */
 
 package org.objectweb.hello_world_soap_http;
   ...
@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ public interface Greeter
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Clientmainfunction">Client main function</h4><p>Here is Java code that implements the HelloWorld client. In summary, the client connects to the <code>SoapPort</code> port on the <code>SOAPService</code> service and then proceeds to invoke each of the operations supported by the <code>Greeter</code> port type.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example4"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Client Implementation Code</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
 
 import java.io.File;
 import java.net.URL;
@@ -392,10 +392,10 @@ public final class Client {
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>The <code>Client.main()</code> function proceeds as follows:</p><ol><li>The CXF runtime is implicitly initialized - that is, provided the CXF runtime classes are loaded. Hence, there is no need to call a special function in order to initialize CXF.</li><li>The client expects a single string argument that gives the location of the WSDL contract for HelloWorld. The WSDL location is stored in <code>wsdlURL</code>.</li><li><p>A new port object (which enables you to access the remote server endpoint) is created in two steps, as shown in the following code fragment:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">SOAPService ss = new SOAPService(wsdlURL, SERVICE_NAME);
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">SOAPService ss = new SOAPService(wsdlURL, SERVICE_NAME);
 Greeter port = ss.getSoapPort();</pre>
 </div></div><p>To create a new port object, you first create a service object (passing in the WSDL location and service name) and then call the appropriate <code>get <em>PortName</em> ()</code> method to obtain an instance of the particular port you need. In this case, the <code>SOAPService</code> service supports only the <code>SoapPort</code> port, which is of <code>Greeter</code> type.</p></li><li>The client proceeds to call each of the methods supported by the <code>Greeter</code> service endpoint interface.</li><li>In the case of the <code>pingMe()</code> operation, the example code shows how to catch the <code>PingMeFault</code> fault exception.</li></ol><h2 id="DevelopingaConsumer-SettingConnectionPropertieswithContexts">Setting Connection Properties with Contexts</h2><p>You can use JAX-WS contexts to customize the properties of a client proxy. In particular, contexts can be used to modify connection properties and to send data in protocol headers. For example, you could use 
 contexts to add a SOAP header, either to a request message or to a response message. The following types of context are supported on the client side:</p><ul><li><strong>Request context</strong> - on the client side, the request context enables you to set properties that affect outbound messages. Request context properties are applied to a specific port instance and, once set, the properties affect every subsequent operation invocation made on the port, until such time as a property is explicitly cleared. For example, you might use a request context property to set a connection timeout or to initialize data for sending in a header.</li><li><strong>Response context</strong> - on the client side, you can access the response context to read the property values set by the inbound message from the last operation invocation. Response context properties are reset after every operation invocation. For example, you might access a response context property to read header information received f
 rom the last inbound message.</li></ul><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Settingarequestcontext">Setting a request context</h4><p>To set a particular request context property, <em>ContextPropertyName</em>, to the value, <em>PropertyValue</em>, use the code shown here:</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example4"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Setting a Request Context Property on the Client Side</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">// Set request context property.
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">// Set request context property.
 java.util.Map&lt;String, Object&gt; requestContext =
   ((javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider)port).getRequestContext();
 requestContext.put(ContextPropertyName, PropertyValue);
@@ -404,7 +404,7 @@ requestContext.put(ContextPropertyName,
 port.SomeOperation();
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>You have to cast the port object to <code>javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider</code> in order to access the request context. The request context itself is of type, <code>java.util.Map&lt;String, Object&gt;</code>, which is a hash map that has keys of <code>String</code> and values of arbitrary type. Use <code>java.util.Map.put()</code> to create a new entry in the hash map.</p><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Readingaresponsecontext">Reading a response context</h4><p>To retrieve a particular response context property, <em>ContextPropertyName</em>, use the code shown here:</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example5"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Reading a Response Context Property on the Client Side</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">// Invoke an operation.
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">// Invoke an operation.
 port.SomeOperation();
 
 // Read response context property.
@@ -413,7 +413,7 @@ java.util.Map&lt;String, Object&gt; resp
 PropertyType propValue = (PropertyType) responseContext.get(ContextPropertyName);
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>The response context is of type, <code>java.util.Map&lt;String, Object&gt;</code>, which is a hash map that has keys of type <code>String</code> and values of an arbitrary type. Use <code>java.util.Map.get()</code> to access an entry in the hash map of response context properties.</p><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Supportedcontexts">Supported contexts</h4><p>CXF supports the following context properties:</p><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Context Property Name</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Context Property Type</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>org.apache.cxf.ws.addressing.JAXWSAConstants.CLIENT_ADDRESSING_PROPERTIES</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>org.apache.cxf.ws.addressing.AddressingProperties</code></p></td></tr></tbody></table></div><h2 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Asynchrono
 usInvocationModel">Asynchronous Invocation Model</h2><p>In addition to the usual synchronous mode of invocation, CXF also supports two forms of asynchronous invocation, as follows:</p><ul><li><strong>Polling approach</strong> - in this case, to invoke the remote operation, you call a special method that has no output parameters, but returns a <code>javax.xml.ws.Response</code> instance. The <code>Response</code> object (which inherits from the <code>javax.util.concurrency.Future</code> interface) can be polled to check whether or not a response message has arrived.</li><li><strong>Callback approach</strong> - in this case, to invoke the remote operation, you call another special method that takes a reference to a callback object (of <code>javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler</code> type) as one of its parameters. Whenever the response message arrives at the client, the CXF runtime calls back on the <code>AsyncHandler</code> object to give it the contents of the response message.</li></ul><p>Bo
 th of these asynchronous invocation approaches are described here and illustrated by code examples.</p><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Contractforasynchronousexample">Contract for asynchronous example</h4><p>The following example shows the WSDL contract that is used for the asynchronous example. The contract defines a single port type, <code>GreeterAsync</code>, which contains a single operation, <code>greetMeSometime</code>.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example6"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>HelloWorld WSDL Contract for Asynchronous Example</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;wsdl:definitions xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;wsdl:definitions xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
            xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
            xmlns:tns="http://apache.org/hello_world_async_soap_http"
            xmlns:x1="http://apache.org/hello_world_async_soap_http/types"
@@ -479,7 +479,7 @@ PropertyType propValue = (PropertyType)
 </div></div><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Generatingtheasynchronousstubcode">Generating the asynchronous stub code</h4><p>The asynchronous style of invocation requires extra stub code (for example, dedicated asychronous methods defined on the service endpoint interface). This special stub code is not generated by default, however. To switch on the asynchronous feature and generate the requisite stub code, you must use the mapping customization feature from the WSDL 2.0 specification.</p><p>Customization enables you to modify the way the wsdl2java utility generates stub code. In particular, it enables you to modify the WSDL-to-Java mapping and to switch on certain features. Here, customization is used to switch on the asynchronous invocation feature. Customizations are specified using a binding declaration, which you define using a <code>jaxws:bindings</code> tag (where the jaxws prefix is tied to the <code>
     <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws" rel="nofollow">http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws</a>
   </code> namespace). There are two alternative ways of specifying a binding declaration:</p><ul><li><strong>External binding declaration</strong> - the <code>jaxws:bindings</code> element is defined in a file separately from the WSDL contract. You specify the location of the binding declaration file to the wsdl2java utility when you generate the stub code.</li><li><strong>Embedded binding declaration</strong> - you can also embed the <code>jaxws:bindings</code> element directly in a WSDL contract, treating it as a WSDL extension. In this case, the settings in <code>jaxws:bindings</code> apply only to the immediate parent element.</li></ul><p>This section considers only the first approach, the external binding declaration. The template for a binding declaration file that switches on asynchronous invocations is shown next:</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example7"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHead
 er panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Template for an Asynchronous Binding Declaration</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;bindings xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;bindings xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
           xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
           wsdlLocation="&lt;at:var at:name="WSDL_LOCATION" /&gt;/hello_world_async.wsdl"
           xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws"&gt;
@@ -491,7 +491,7 @@ PropertyType propValue = (PropertyType)
 </div></div><p>Where <em>AffectedWSDLContract</em> specifies the URL of the WSDL contract that is affected by this binding declaration. The <em>AffectedNode</em> is an XPath value that specifies which node (or nodes) from the WSDL contract are affected by this binding declaration. You can set <em>AffectedNode</em> to <code>wsdl:definitions</code>, if you want the entire WSDL contract to be affected. The {jaxws:enableAsyncMapping}} element is set to <code>true</code> to enable the asynchronous invocation feature.</p><p>For example, if you want to generate asynchronous methods only for the <code>GreeterAsync</code> port type, you could specify <code>&lt;bindings node="wsdl:definitions/wsdl:portType<a shape="rect" class="unresolved" href="#">@name='GreeterAsync'</a>"&gt;</code> in the preceding binding declaration.</p><p>Assuming that the binding declaration is stored in a file, <code>async_binding.xml</code>, you can generate the requisite stub files with asynchronous support by enter
 ing the following wsdl2java command:</p><div class="panel" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="panelContent">
 <p><code>wsdl2java -ant -client -d ClientDir -b async_binding.xml hello_world.wsdl</code></p>
 </div></div><p>When you run the wsdl2java command, you specify the location of the binding declaration file using the -b option. After generating the stub code in this way, the <code>GreeterAsync</code> service endpoint interface (in the file <code>GreeterAsync.java</code>) is defined as shown below:</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example8"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Service Endpoint Interface with Methods for Asynchronous Invocations</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">/* Generated by WSDLToJava Compiler. */
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">/* Generated by WSDLToJava Compiler. */
 package org.apache.hello_world_async_soap_http;
 ...
 import java.util.concurrent.Future;
@@ -514,7 +514,7 @@ public interface GreeterAsync {
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>In addition to the usual synchronous method, <code>greetMeSometime()</code>, two asynchronous methods are also generated for the <code>greetMeSometime</code> operation, as follows:</p><ul><li><code>greetMeSometimeAsync()</code> method with <code>Future&lt;?&gt;</code> return type and an extra <code>javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler</code> parameter - call this method for the callback approach to asynchronous invocation.</li><li><code>greetMeSometimeAsync()</code> method with <code>Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt;</code> return type - call this method for the polling approach to asynchronous invocation.</li></ul><p>The details of the callback approach and the polling approach are discussed in the following subsections.</p><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Implementinganasynchronousclientwiththepollingapproach">Implementing an asynchronous client with the polling approach</h4><p>The below sample illustrates the polling approach to making an asynchronous operation call. Using t
 his approach, the client invokes the<br clear="none"> operation by calling the special Java method, <code>_OperationName_Async()</code>, that returns a <code>javax.xml.ws.Response&lt;T&gt;</code> object, where T is the type of the operation's response message. The <code>Response&lt;T&gt;</code> object can be polled at a later stage to check whether the operation's response message has arrived.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example9"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Polling Approach for an Asynchronous Operation Call</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
 
 import java.io.File;
 import java.util.concurrent.Future;
@@ -548,14 +548,14 @@ public final class Client {
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>The <code>greetMeSometimeAsync()</code> method invokes the <code>greetMeSometimes</code> operation, transmitting the input parameters to the remote service and returning a reference to a <code>javax.xml.ws.Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt;</code> object. The <code>Response</code> class is defined by extending the standard <code>java.util.concurrency.Future&lt;T&gt;</code> interface, which is specifically designed for polling the outcome of work performed by a concurrent thread. There are essentially two basic approaches to polling using the <code>Response</code> object:</p><ul><li><p><strong>Non-blocking polling</strong> - before attempting to get the result, check whether the response has arrived by calling the non-blocking<br clear="none"> <code>Response&lt;T&gt;.isDone()</code> method. For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt; greetMeSomeTimeResp = ...;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt; greetMeSomeTimeResp = ...;
 
 if (greetMeSomeTimeResp.isDone()) {
   GreetMeSometimeResponse reply = greetMeSomeTimeResp.get();
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div></li><li><p><strong>Blocking polling</strong> - call <code>Response&lt;T&gt;.get()</code> right away and block until the response arrives (optionally specifying a timeout). For example, to poll for a response, with a 60 second timeout:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt; greetMeSomeTimeResp = ...;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">Response&lt;GreetMeSometimeResponse&gt; greetMeSomeTimeResp = ...;
 
 GreetMeSometimeResponse reply = greetMeSomeTimeResp.get(
   60L,
@@ -563,7 +563,7 @@ GreetMeSometimeResponse reply = greetMeS
   );
 </pre>
 </div></div></li></ul><h4 id="DevelopingaConsumer-Implementinganasynchronousclientwiththecallbackapproach">Implementing an asynchronous client with the callback approach</h4><p>An alternative approach to making an asynchronous operation invocation is to implement a callback class, by deriving from the<br clear="none"> <code>javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler</code> interface. This callback class must implement a <code>handleResponse()</code> method, which is called by the CXF runtime to notify the client that the response has arrived. The following shows an outline of the <code>AsyncHandler</code> interface that you need to implement.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example10"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>The javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler Interface</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">package javax.xml.ws;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">package javax.xml.ws;
 
 public interface AsyncHandler&lt;T&gt;
 {
@@ -571,7 +571,7 @@ public interface AsyncHandler&lt;T&gt;
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>In this example, a callback class, <code>TestAsyncHandler</code>, is defined as shown below.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example11"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>The TestAsyncHandler Callback Class</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
 
 import javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler;
 import javax.xml.ws.Response;
@@ -595,7 +595,7 @@ public class TestAsyncHandler implements
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>The implementation of <code>handleResponse()</code> shown in <a shape="rect" href="developing-a-consumer.html">#Example11</a> simply gets the response data and stores it in a member variable, <code>reply</code>. The extra <code>getResponse()</code> method is just a convenience method that extracts the sole output parameter (that is, <code>responseType</code>) from the response.</p><p><a shape="rect" href="developing-a-consumer.html">#Example12</a> illustrates the callback approach to making an asynchronous operation call. Using this approach, the client invokes the operation by calling the special Java method, <code>_OperationName_Async()</code>, that returns a <code>java.util.concurrency.Future&lt;?&gt;</code> object and takes an extra parameter of <code>AsyncHandler&lt;T&gt;</code>.</p><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaConsumer-Example12"></span></p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" st
 yle="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Callback Approach for an Asynchronous Operation Call</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">package demo.hw.client;
 
 import java.io.File;
 import java.util.concurrent.Future;

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-service.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-service.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-a-service.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,8 +32,8 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushBash.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -118,11 +118,11 @@ Apache CXF -- Developing a Service
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1505311235392 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311235392 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311235392 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314908925 {padding: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314908925 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314908925 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
 
-/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505311235392">
+/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505314908925">
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#DevelopingaService-DevelopingaServiceusingJAX-WS">Developing a Service using JAX-WS</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#DevelopingaService-WSDLFirstDevelopment">WSDL First Development</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#DevelopingaService-GeneratingtheStartingPointCode">Generating the Starting Point Code</a>
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ div.rbtoc1505311235392 li {margin-left:
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example1"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Implementation of the Greeter Service</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package demo.hw.server;
 
 import org.apache.hello_world_soap_http.Greeter;
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ In this pattern, you typically have an e
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example2"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Simple SEI</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.apache.cxf;
 
 public interface QuoteReporter
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ public interface QuoteReporter
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example3"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Implementation for SEI</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.apache.cxf;
 
 import java.util.*;
@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ public class StockQuoteReporter implemen
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example4"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Interface with the @WebService Annotation</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package com.mycompany.demo;
 
 import javax.jws.*;
@@ -367,7 +367,7 @@ public interface QuoteReporter
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example5"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Annotated Service Implementation Class</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.apache.cxf;
 
 import javax.jws.*;
@@ -410,7 +410,7 @@ public class StockQuoteReporter implemen
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example6"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Specifying an RPC/LITERAL SOAP Binding</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.eric.demo;
 
 import javax.jws.*;
@@ -481,7 +481,7 @@ FixMe: <code>faultName</code> is defined
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example7"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>SEI with Annotated Methods</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.apache.cxf;
 
 import javax.jws.*;
@@ -526,7 +526,7 @@ public interface QuoteReporter
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example8"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Fully Annotated SEI</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package org.apache.cxf;
 
 import javax.jws.*;
@@ -566,7 +566,7 @@ public interface QuoteReporter
 
 <p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="DevelopingaService-Example9"></span></p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Generated WSDL from an SEI</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?&gt;
 &lt;wsdl:definitions targetNamespace="http://demo.eric.org/"
     xmlns:tns="http://demo.eric.org/"

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-assertions.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-assertions.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/developing-assertions.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,9 +32,9 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushBash.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ Implementation of <em>build()</em> metho
 
 <p>This is the easiest way of providing runtime support for an Assertion. Steps 1. and 2. listed in <a shape="rect" href="ws-policy-framework-overview.html">Interaction with the Framework</a> can usually be coded as follows:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 package mycompany.com.interceptors;
 import org.apache.cxf.ws.policy.AssertionInfoMap;
 
@@ -191,7 +191,7 @@ class MyPolicyAwareInterceptor {
 
 <p>Sometimes, it may be more convenient to spead the above functionality accross several interceptors, possibly according to chain (in, in fault, out, outfault). In any case, you need to also provide a PolicyInterceptorProvider, and declare a corresponding bean. Either implement one from scratch or use the PolicyInterceptorProviderImpl in the api package and customise it as follows (assuming that one and the same interceptor is used for all paths). The main task of policy interceptor provider is to say which interceptors must be activated for specified policy assertion:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 
 &lt;bean name="MyPolicyAwareInterceptor" 
       class="mycompany.com.interceptors.MyPolicyAwareInterceptor"/&gt;
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ class MyPolicyAwareInterceptor {
 <p>It is also possible to implement policy interceptor provider programmatically from scratch. It's constructor gives assertions QNames as argument of super constructor and adds corresponded interceptors using getters:</p>
 
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 public class MyInterceptorProvider extends AbstractPolicyInterceptorProvider {
     private static final long serialVersionUID = -5248428637449096540L;
     private static final MyInInterceptor IN_INTERCEPTOR = new MyInInterceptor();
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ public class MyInterceptorProvider exten
 
 <p>Since version 2.5.2, Assertion builder and policy interceptor provider can be registered using CXF bus extension mechanism: just create a file META-INF/cxf/bus-extensions.txt containing the following:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 org.company.MyInterceptorProvider::true
 org.company.MyAssertionBuilder::true
 </pre>
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ Since CXF 2.6.0 it is possible to regist
 <h3 id="DevelopingAssertions-Initialisation">Initialisation</h3>
 <p>Conduits/Destinations have access to the EndpointInfo object in their their constructors,. Assuming they also have access to the bus, they can at any time in their lifecycle obtain the effective policy for the endpoint as follows:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 class MyPolicyAwareConduit {
     static final QName assertionType = new QName("http://mycompany.com}", 
         "MyType"});
@@ -308,7 +308,7 @@ class MyPolicyAwareConduit {
 HTTPConduit is an exmaple of a policy aware Conduit. It supports assertions of type HTTPClientPolicy, which are represented in the runtime as JaxbAssertion&lt;HTTPClientPolicy&gt; objects. HTTPConduit also has a data member of type HTTPClientPolicy. It implements assertMessage as follows: for outbound messages, it asserts all JaxbAssertion&lt;HTTPClientPolicy&gt;  that are compatible with this data member. For inboun d messages, all HTTPClientPolicy assertions are asserted regardless their attributes. The rationale for this is that the sematics of the HTTPClientPolicy assertion effectively does not mandate any specific action on the inbound message.<br clear="none">
 Similary, on its inbound path,  the HTTPDestination asserts all HTTPServerPolicy assertions that are equal to the HTTPServerPolicy assertion configured for the destination, and all assertions of that type on the outbound path.</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 class MyPolicyAwareConduit implements Assertor {
     static final QName MYTYPE = new QName("http://mycompany.com}", 
         "MyType"});

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/dynamic-clients.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/dynamic-clients.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/dynamic-clients.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Dynamic Clients
 
 <p>Let's pretend for a moment that you have a WSDL which defines a single operation "echo" which takes an input of a string and outputs a String. You could use the JaxWsDynamicClientFactory for it like this:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 JaxWsDynamicClientFactory dcf = JaxWsDynamicClientFactory.newInstance();
 Client client = dcf.createClient("echo.wsdl");
 
@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ System.out.println("Echo response: " + r
 </div></div>
 <p>Many WSDLs will have more complex types though. In this case the JaxWsDynamicClientFactory takes care of generating Java classes for these types. For example, we may have a People service which keeps track of people in an organization. In the sample below we create a Person object that was generated for us dynamically and send it to the server using the addPerson operation:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 JaxWsDynamicClientFactory dcf = JaxWsDynamicClientFactory.newInstance();
 Client client = dcf.createClient("people.wsdl", classLoader);
 

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/embedding-cxf-inside-spring.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/embedding-cxf-inside-spring.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/embedding-cxf-inside-spring.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Embedding CXF inside Sprin
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-note"><p class="title">Changes in CXF 2.4.x</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-warning confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p><strong>The below is applicable for CXF versions 2.3.x and older.</strong> Starting in CXF 2.4.0, the extensions are loaded internally by CXF automatically and you do not need to import all the cxf-extension-*.xml file. You only need to import classpath:META-INF/cxf/cxf.xml.</p></div></div><p>You can embed CXF within an existing Spring application. Since all XML configuration files are Spring xml files, the two approaches should be equivalent.</p><p>CXF includes Spring configuration files which configure the various CXF modules. You will want to import these into your application. Here is an example that imports the core CXF components, the SOAP binding, and the servlet transport:</p><div clas
 s="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
 	xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
 	xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
 	xsi:schemaLocation="
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws http://cxf.a
 &lt;/beans&gt;
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>To include all the CXF modules you can use cxf-all or a wildcard expression:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
 	xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
 	xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
 	xsi:schemaLocation="

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/failoverfeature.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/failoverfeature.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/failoverfeature.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -117,14 +117,14 @@ Apache CXF -- FailoverFeature
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><h1 id="FailoverFeature-FailoverandLoadDistributorFeature">Failover and Load Distributor Feature</h1><p><style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1505311252213 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311252213 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311252213 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314874072 {padding: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314874072 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314874072 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
 
-/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505311252213">
+/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505314874072">
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#FailoverFeature-FailoverandLoadDistributorFeature">Failover and Load Distributor Feature</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#FailoverFeature-Failover">Failover</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#FailoverFeature-CircuitBreakersFailover">Circuit Breakers Failover</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#FailoverFeature-LoadDistribution">Load Distribution</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#FailoverFeature-ConfiguringJAX-RSclients">Configuring JAX-RS clients</a></li></ul>
 </div><h1 id="FailoverFeature-Failover">Failover</h1><p>The CXF Failover feature allows to configure CXF frontend clients to retry a call when the target endpoint becomes unavailable.<br clear="none"> A number of retry strategies available: a client can iterate sequentially over the alternative addresses or chose them randomly. <br clear="none"> Every strategy can be configured to do a delay between selecting the addresses.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
        xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
        xmlns:clustering="http://cxf.apache.org/clustering"
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ http://www.springframework.org/schema/ut
 &lt;/beans&gt;
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>Note, org.apache.cxf.clustering.RetryStrategy can be used to retry the same, last address for a limited number of times, before switching to the next address. Use RetryStrategy 'maxNumberOfRetries' property. RetryStrategy currently uses a sequential algorithm for selecting the addresses.</p><h1 id="FailoverFeature-CircuitBreakersFailover">Circuit Breakers Failover</h1><p>The recent addition to CXF failover features is the implementation based on circuit breakers, more precisely Apache Zest (<a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://zest.apache.org/">https://zest.apache.org/</a>) library. The configuration is very similar to the regular failover strategy, the only difference is usage of<strong> clustering:circuit-breaker-failover</strong> element.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
        xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
        xmlns:clustering="http://cxf.apache.org/clustering"
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ http://www.springframework.org/schema/ut
 
 &lt;/beans&gt;</pre>
 </div></div><p>Circuit breakers have recommended themselves as a proven strategy to handle and monitor the failures related to external service calls, giving the external systems a time to recover by preventing endless retries or time-outing. For that reason, two configuration parameters could be tuned:</p><ul style="list-style-type: square;"><li><strong>threshold</strong>: the error threshold to open the circuit breaker</li><li><strong>timeout</strong>: the timeout to wait before trying the next invocation</li></ul><h1 id="FailoverFeature-LoadDistribution">Load Distribution</h1><p>Load Distributor Feature is a Failover feature which can allow the clients to iterate over alternative addresses on every new call, irrespectively of whether the last call has reached its target or not. It can help with the controlling the traffic originating from CXF clients at individual servers.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
        xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
        xmlns:clustering="http://cxf.apache.org/clustering"

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/features.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/features.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/features.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,8 +32,8 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Features
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><h1 id="Features-FeaturesinCXF">Features in CXF</h1><p>A Feature in CXF is a way of adding capabilities to a Server, Client or Bus. For example, you could add the ability to log messages for each of these objects, by configuring them with a LoggingFeature. To implement a Feature, you must subclass AbstractFeature below. By default the initialize methods all delegate to initializeProvider(InterceptorProvider), so if you're simply adding interceptors to a Server, Client, or Bus, this allows you to add them easily.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">public abstract class AbstractFeature {
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public abstract class AbstractFeature {
     public void initialize(Server server, Bus bus) {
         initializeProvider(server.getEndpoint(), bus);
     }
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Features
 
 </pre>
 </div></div><h1 id="Features-WritingandconfiguringtheFeature">Writing and configuring the Feature</h1><p>CXF provides several features to configure commonly used capabilities, such as logging, failover, policies, addressing, and reliable messaging. You can go to the <a shape="rect" href="featureslist.html">FeaturesList</a> for more information.</p><h2 id="Features-WritingaFeature">Writing a Feature</h2><p>It is very easy to write a new feature; your feature just needs to extends the AbstractFeature and implement initializeProvider or write customizing code for configuring client or server interceptors. Here is an example for implementing the logging feature.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">public class LoggingFeature extends AbstractFeature {
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">public class LoggingFeature extends AbstractFeature {
     private static final int DEFAULT_LIMIT = 100 * 1024;
     private static final LoggingInInterceptor IN = new LoggingInInterceptor(DEFAULT_LIMIT);
     private static final LoggingOutInterceptor OUT = new LoggingOutInterceptor(DEFAULT_LIMIT);
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Features
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><h2 id="Features-AddingaFeatureprogrammatically">Adding a Feature programmatically</h2><p>To add the feature to both server and client, you can use the Feature annotation on the service class</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">    @org.apache.cxf.feature.Features (features = "org.apache.cxf.jaxws.service.AnnotationFeature")
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">    @org.apache.cxf.feature.Features (features = "org.apache.cxf.jaxws.service.AnnotationFeature")
     public class HelloServiceImpl implements HelloService {
         public String sayHi() {
             return "HI";
@@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ Apache CXF -- Features
 
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>You can also add the feature to the server by using ServerFactoryBean, or the client by using the ClientFactoryBean</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">import org.apache.cxf.frontend.ServerFactoryBean;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">import org.apache.cxf.frontend.ServerFactoryBean;
 import org.apache.cxf.frontend.ClientFactoryBean;
 ...
 ServerFactoryBean serverFactoryBean = new ServerFactoryBean();
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ clientFactoryBean.setFeatures(new ArrayL
 
 </pre>
 </div></div><h2 id="Features-AddingaFeaturethroughconfiguration">Adding a Feature through configuration</h2><p>Here are some examples on using configuration files to add features. You can find more information about the CXF provides features at <a shape="rect" href="featureslist.html">FeaturesList</a>.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cxf="http://cxf.apache.org/core"
       xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/general-cxf-logging.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/general-cxf-logging.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/general-cxf-logging.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,9 +32,9 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushBash.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -119,11 +119,11 @@ Apache CXF -- General CXF Logging
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><h1 id="GeneralCXFLogging-Configuringlogginglevels">Configuring logging levels</h1><p>In the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/cxf/trunk/distribution/src/main/release/etc/">/etc folder</a> of the CXF distribution there is a sample Java SE logging.properties file you can use to configure logging. For example, if you want to change the console logging level from WARNING to FINE, you need to update two properties in this logging.properties file as below:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">.level= FINE
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">.level= FINE
 java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.level = FINE
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>Once this is done, you will need to set the <strong>-Djava.util.logging.config.file</strong> property to the location of the logging.properties file. As an example, the Ant target below has this property set:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;target name="runClient"&gt;
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">&lt;target name="runClient"&gt;
    &lt;java classname="client.WSClient" fork="true"&gt;	    	
       &lt;classpath&gt;
          &lt;pathelement location="${build.classes.dir}"/&gt;
@@ -136,13 +136,13 @@ java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.level =
 &lt;/target&gt;
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>Alternatively, for SOAP clients, you can modify the Java-wide logging.properties file in the JDK_HOME/jre/lib folder, or for servlet-hosted web service providers, placing a logging.properties file in the WEB-INF/classes folder (see <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-8.0-doc/logging.html">here</a> for more details.)</p><h2 id="GeneralCXFLogging-UsingLog4jInsteadofjava.util.logging">Using Log4j Instead of java.util.logging</h2><p>As noted above, CXF uses the <code>java.util.logging</code> package ("Java SE Logging") by default. But it is possible to switch CXF to instead use <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://logging.apache.org/log4j/">Log4J</a>. This is achieved through the use of configuration files. There are two options to bootstrapping CXF logging and each is listed below:</p><ul><li>Add the following system property to the classpath from which CXF is initialized:</li></ul><div class="code panel pdl" style="b
 order-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">-Dorg.apache.cxf.Logger=org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Log4jLogger
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">-Dorg.apache.cxf.Logger=org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Log4jLogger
 </pre>
 </div></div><ul><li>Add the file <code>META-INF/cxf/org.apache.cxf.Logger</code> to the classpath and make sure it contains the following content:</li></ul><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Log4jLogger
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Log4jLogger
 </pre>
 </div></div><h2 id="GeneralCXFLogging-UsingSLF4JInsteadofjava.util.logging(since2.2.8)">Using SLF4J Instead of java.util.logging (since 2.2.8)</h2><p>As noted above, CXF uses the <code>java.util.logging</code> package by default. But it is possible to switch CXF to instead use <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://www.slf4j.org/" rel="nofollow">SLF4J</a>. This is achieved through the use of configuration files. There are two options to bootstrapping CXF logging and each is listed below:</p><ul><li>Add the following system property to the classpath from which CXF is initialized:</li></ul><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">-Dorg.apache.cxf.Logger=org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Slf4jLogger
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">-Dorg.apache.cxf.Logger=org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Slf4jLogger
 </pre>
 </div></div><ul><li>Add the file <code>META-INF/cxf/org.apache.cxf.Logger</code> to the classpath and make sure it contains the following content:</li></ul><pre>org.apache.cxf.common.logging.Slf4jLogger
 </pre></div>

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/generic-tracing-component.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/generic-tracing-component.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/generic-tracing-component.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -129,13 +129,13 @@ The tracing should support a flow id tha
 
 
 
-<span class="gliffy-container" id="gliffy-container-25591961-2911" data-fullwidth="1411" data-ceoid="25202745" data-edit="${diagramEditLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-full="${diagramZoomLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-filename="Tracing Component">
+<span class="gliffy-container" id="gliffy-container-25591961-7255" data-fullwidth="1411" data-ceoid="25202745" data-edit="${diagramEditLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-full="${diagramZoomLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-filename="Tracing Component">
 
-    <map id="gliffy-map-25591961-3646" name="gliffy-map-25591961-3646"></map>
+    <map id="gliffy-map-25591961-3405" name="gliffy-map-25591961-3405"></map>
 
-    <img class="gliffy-image" id="gliffy-image-25591961-2911" width="1411" height="510" data-full-width="1411" data-full-height="510" src="https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/download/attachments/25202745/Tracing%20Component.png?version=1&amp;modificationDate=1298355725000&amp;api=v2" alt="Tracing Component" usemap="#gliffy-map-25591961-3646">
+    <img class="gliffy-image" id="gliffy-image-25591961-7255" width="1411" height="510" data-full-width="1411" data-full-height="510" src="https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/download/attachments/25202745/Tracing%20Component.png?version=1&amp;modificationDate=1298355725000&amp;api=v2" alt="Tracing Component" usemap="#gliffy-map-25591961-3405">
 
-    <map class="gliffy-dynamic" id="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591961-2911" name="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591961-2911"></map>
+    <map class="gliffy-dynamic" id="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591961-7255" name="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591961-7255"></map>
 </span>
 
 
@@ -146,13 +146,13 @@ The tracing should support a flow id tha
 
 
 
-<span class="gliffy-container" id="gliffy-container-25591966-5545" data-fullwidth="565" data-ceoid="25202745" data-edit="${diagramEditLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-full="${diagramZoomLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-filename="Design Flow id">
+<span class="gliffy-container" id="gliffy-container-25591966-2774" data-fullwidth="565" data-ceoid="25202745" data-edit="${diagramEditLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-full="${diagramZoomLink.getLinkUrl()}" data-filename="Design Flow id">
 
-    <map id="gliffy-map-25591966-2515" name="gliffy-map-25591966-2515"></map>
+    <map id="gliffy-map-25591966-794" name="gliffy-map-25591966-794"></map>
 
-    <img class="gliffy-image" id="gliffy-image-25591966-5545" width="565" height="276" data-full-width="565" data-full-height="276" src="https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/download/attachments/25202745/Design%20Flow%20id.png?version=2&amp;modificationDate=1298893753000&amp;api=v2" alt="Design Flow id" usemap="#gliffy-map-25591966-2515">
+    <img class="gliffy-image" id="gliffy-image-25591966-2774" width="565" height="276" data-full-width="565" data-full-height="276" src="https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/download/attachments/25202745/Design%20Flow%20id.png?version=2&amp;modificationDate=1298893753000&amp;api=v2" alt="Design Flow id" usemap="#gliffy-map-25591966-794">
 
-    <map class="gliffy-dynamic" id="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591966-5545" name="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591966-5545"></map>
+    <map class="gliffy-dynamic" id="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591966-2774" name="gliffy-dynamic-map-25591966-2774"></map>
 </span>
 
 </div>

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-client.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-client.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-client.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -119,11 +119,11 @@ Apache CXF -- How do I develop a client?
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p><br clear="none">
 CXF provides you with many options to build clients for your services. This guide is meant to give you a quick overview of those options and help you orient yourself quickly with CXF.</p>
 <style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1505311190012 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311190012 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 20px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311190012 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314906128 {padding: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314906128 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 20px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314906128 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
 
-/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505311190012">
+/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505314906128">
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-BuildingClients">Building Clients</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-WSDL2JavageneratedClient">WSDL2Java generated Client</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-JAX-WSProxy">JAX-WS Proxy</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-JAX-WSDispatchAPIs">JAX-WS Dispatch APIs</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-SimpleFrontendClientProxy">Simple Frontend Client Proxy</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaclient?-DynamicClient">Dynamic Client</a></li></ul>
 </li></ul>
@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@ div.rbtoc1505311190012 li {margin-left:
 
 <p>One of the most common scenarios is that where you have a service which you may or not manage and this service has a WSDL. In this case you'll often want to generate a client from the WSDL. This provides you with a strongly typed interface by which to interact with the service. Once you've generated a client, typical usage of it will look like so:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 HelloService service = new HelloService();
 Hello client = service.getHelloHttpPort();
 
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ String result = client.sayHi("Joe");
 
 <p>Instead of using a wsdl2java-generated stub client directly, you can use Service.create to create Service instances, the following code illustrates this process:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 import java.net.URL;
 import javax.xml.ws.Service;
 ...
@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ String result = client.greetMe("test");
 
 <p>JAX-WS provides the "dispatch" mechanism which makes it easy to dynamically invoke services which you have not generated a client for. Using the Dispatch mechanism you can create messages (which can be JAXB objects, Source objects, or a SAAJMessage) and dispatch them to the server. A simple example might look like this:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 import java.net.URL;
 import javax.xml.transform.Source;
 import javax.xml.ws.Dispatch;
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ Source response = disp.invoke(request);
 
 <p>CXF includes a Client interface which allows you to invoke operations and pass parameters for those operations. For instance:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 Client client = ....;
 Object[] result = client.invoke("sayHi", "Dan");
 </pre>

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-service.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-service.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-do-i-develop-a-service.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -117,14 +117,14 @@ Apache CXF -- How do I develop a service
            <!-- Content -->
            <div class="wiki-content">
 <div id="ConfluenceContent"><p><br clear="none"> CXF provides you with many options to build services. This guide is meant to give you a quick overview of those options and help you orient yourself quickly with CXF.</p><p><style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
-div.rbtoc1505311269072 {padding: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311269072 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
-div.rbtoc1505311269072 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314876471 {padding: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314876471 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;}
+div.rbtoc1505314876471 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;}
 
-/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505311269072">
+/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1505314876471">
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaservice?-DifferentTypesOfServices">Different Types Of Services</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSAnnotatedServicesfromJava">JAX-WS Annotated Services from Java</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSAnnotatedServicesfromWSDL">JAX-WS Annotated Services from WSDL</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSProviders">JAX-WS Providers</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#HowdoIdevelopaservice?-Javascript">Javascript</a></li></ul>
 </div><h1 id="HowdoIdevelopaservice?-DifferentTypesOfServices">Different Types Of Services</h1><p>CXF support three major types of services:</p><ul><li>SOAP - this page summarizes the options for creating SOAP services.</li><li>REST-ful - REST support is described <a shape="rect" href="restful-services.html">here</a>.</li><li>CORBA</li></ul><h1 id="HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSAnnotatedServicesfromJava">JAX-WS Annotated Services from Java</h1><p>The JAX-WS APIs include a set of <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://jax-ws.java.net/nonav/2.2.8/docs/ch03.html#users-guide-annotations" rel="nofollow">annotations</a> which allow you to build services using annotated classes. These services are based on a single class which contains a set of operations.</p><p>Here's a simple example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">@WebService
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">@WebService
 public class Hello {
   public String sayHi(String name) {
     return "Hello " + name;
@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ public class Hello {
 }
 </pre>
 </div></div><p>JAX-WS includes many more annotations as well such as:</p><ul><li>@WebMethod - allows you to customize the operation name, exclude the operation from inclusion in the service, etc</li><li>@WebParam - allows you to customize a parameter's name, namespace, direction (IN or OUT), etc</li><li>@WebResult - allows you to customize the return value of the web service call</li></ul><p>Data is marshalled from XML to Java and vice versa via the <a shape="rect" href="jaxb.html">JAXB data-binding</a>.</p><p>Services are publish via one of two means:</p><ul><li>The JAX-WS standard Endpoint APIs</li><li>CXF's XML configuration format - i.e. &lt;jaxws:endpoint ... /&gt;</li></ul><p>More Information: <a shape="rect" href="a-simple-jax-ws-service.html">A simple JAX-WS service</a>, <a shape="rect" href="developing-a-service.html">Developing a JAX-WS Service</a> (goes into much more depth), <a shape="rect" href="writing-a-service-with-spring.html">Writing a service with Spring</a></p><h
 1 id="HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSAnnotatedServicesfromWSDL">JAX-WS Annotated Services from WSDL</h1><p>If you have existing WSDLs for your service or wish to write your WSDL first and then generate classes, CXF has many tools to help you do this.</p><p>The WSDL2Java tool will generate a JAX-WS annotated service and server stub from your WSDL. You can run it one of three ways:</p><ul><li><a shape="rect" href="wsdl-to-java.html">The command line</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="using-cxf-with-maven.html">The Maven Plugin</a></li><li>With the WSDL2Java API</li></ul><p>Note that CXF generally restricts WSDL support to WSI-BP, not the full WSDL 1.1 specification.</p><p>There is also a <a shape="rect" href="simple-frontend.html">Simple Frontend</a> that allows you to create services without usage of Java annotations, using XML configuration files instead.</p><h1 id="HowdoIdevelopaservice?-JAX-WSProviders">JAX-WS Providers</h1><p>JAX-WS Providers allow you to create services which work 
 at the message level - as opposed to the operation level as with annotated classes. The have a single operation "invoke" which receives either the message payload (i.e. the SOAP Body) or the whole message itself (i.e. the SOAP Envelope).</p><p>Here's a simple example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">@WebServiceProvider
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">@WebServiceProvider
 public class HelloProvider {
   public Source invoke(Source request) {
     return ....;

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-it-works.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-it-works.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-it-works.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -32,8 +32,8 @@
 <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="/resources/highlighter/styles/shThemeCXF.css">
 
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js'></script>
-<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js'></script>
+<script src='/resources/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js'></script>
 <script>
   SyntaxHighlighter.defaults['toolbar'] = false;
   SyntaxHighlighter.all();
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ With xml element attachment in WSDL 1.1,
 
 <p>PolicyAttachments are flexible w.r.t. the type of domain expressions. Domain expressions are used to identify entities such as endpoints, operations or messages with which a policy can be associated:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;wsp:PolicyAttachment&gt;
     &lt;wsp:AppliesTo&gt; 
         &lt;x:DomainExpression/&gt; +
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ When the effective message policy is not
 Given an assertion type that has attributes, and assuming there are two instances of assertions of this type, it is possible that the interceptor can assert one, but not the other. In any case, inability to support all assertions understood by the interceptor does not necessarily indicate a failure. As mentioned above in relation to pre-emptive interceptor installation, it is possible that the ones that cannot be supported do not in fact apply to the underlying message at all. <br clear="none">
 Typically the interceptor would strive at supporting as many of these assertions as possible however, and to do so it may avail of the AssertionBuilder's capability to compute a compatible assertion. For example, by scheduling an acknowledgement to be sent in 3 seconds, an RM interceptor would support both of the following RMAssertions:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;wsrmp:RMAssertion xmlns:wsrmp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/02/rm/policy"&gt;
     &lt;wsrmp:AcknowledgementInterval Milliseconds="30000"/&gt;
 &lt;/wsrmp:RMAssertion&gt;

Modified: websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-to-define-policies.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-to-define-policies.html (original)
+++ websites/production/cxf/content/docs/how-to-define-policies.html Wed Sep 13 15:05:52 2017
@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ Apache CXF -- How to Define Policies
 <h4 id="HowtoDefinePolicies-WSDLPolicyattachment">WSDL Policy attachment</h4>
 <p>WS-Policies can be attached and referenced in WSDL elements. <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://www.w3.org/TR/ws-policy-attach/" rel="nofollow">Web Services Policy 1.5 - Attachment </a> standard describes all possible alternatives. WS-Policies can be placed inside WSDL itself or referenced as external documents. CXF will automatically recognize, read and use policies defined or referenced in WSDL. Sample of attached policy is shown below:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;wsdl:definitions name="HelloWorld" targetNamespace="http://apache.org/hello_world_soap_http" 
 &#8230;
 &lt;wsdl:service name="SOAPService"&gt;
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ Apache CXF -- How to Define Policies
 <p>It is possible to define policies directly in Spring configuration of client and service as jaxws feature. CXF will recognize and use configured WS-Policies:<br clear="none">
 Client:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
        xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
        xmlns:cxf="http://cxf.apache.org/core"
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws http://cxf.a
 
 <p>Service:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<pre class="brush: bash; gutter: false; theme: Confluence" style="font-size:12px;">
+<pre class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" style="font-size:12px;">
 &lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
        xmlns:jaxws="http://cxf.apache.org/jaxws"
        xmlns:cxf="http://cxf.apache.org/core"



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