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From Jan Lehnardt <...@apache.org>
Subject Re: [VOTE] Apache CouchDB 1.2.0 release, first round
Date Mon, 13 Feb 2012 10:45:57 GMT
Hi Roger,

On Feb 13, 2012, at 10:09 , roger.moffatt@gmail.com wrote:

> I've been following this thread with interest and concern.
> 
> None of you will know me, so let me first say I'm a Couch end user and
> developer - and a huge fan of the technology who is worried about the
> future direction of Couch following the Couchbase debacle.

Not to branch off too far, but what debacle other than "Damien left the 
ship"? I’m happy to discuss anything that is unclear.


> Regardless of the subtleties, what the RFC might say, what other systems
> might do, to me it seems a screaming fundamental that what I put in to the
> data store is what comes back from it.
> 
> If I store 1.0 in a field, I expect to get 1.0 back over the wire. Not 1,
> 1.0000000000000000000000001 or anything other than exactly the same
> document that I stored in the first place.
> 
> Same goes for storing 1
> 
> I expect to get back 1, not 1.0 or any other mangled version regardless of
> how arguably mathematically equivalent it might be.
> 
> So rule 1 has to be, whatever I put in, I get back.
> 
> What happens at a view level is different. If I've stored 1.0 or 1 as a
> numeric (ie non-string) value, then what happens in the javascript of a
> view is more flexible. Here I'm living in the real world of nasty floats
> etc and in this case my view code should take appropriate care of what the
> number might actually be. I'd kind of expect anything with a decimal point
> to be interpreted as a float and anything without one to be interpreted as
> an integer. That seems pretty basic and easy to understand.
> 
> Apologies if I'm missing the point - and obviously I'm new around here, but
> the one inviolable point to me seems to be that whatever I store, I should
> get back unchanged. Period. If we break that, we're no longer a data store.

Thanks for writing in. I don't want to side pro or against your point, but
just thank you for taking the time (and courage I presume) to write in and
weigh in with your opinion. CouchDB is better off because of it and I hope
this encourages others to follow you :)

Cheers
Jan
-- 



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