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From Marvin Humphrey <mar...@rectangular.com>
Subject Re: [DISCUSS] Automate signed icla to git commits
Date Fri, 25 Apr 2014 21:43:25 GMT
On Fri, Apr 25, 2014 at 12:42 PM, Jesse <purplecabbage@gmail.com> wrote:
> We can accept trivial commits without an ICLA, so the commit hook would
> need a firm definition of 'trivial'.

Section 5 of the ALv2 covers contributions:

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0.html#contributions

    5. Submission of Contributions.

    Unless You explicitly state otherwise, any Contribution intentionally
    submitted for inclusion in the Work by You to the Licensor shall be under
    the terms and conditions of this License, without any additional terms or
    conditions. [...]

Technically, Apache doesn't require an ICLA or software grant for
submissions, no
matter what the size.  What we need is documentation of the contributor's
intent to contribute, captured within Apache-archived communication channels
(mailing list, bug tracker, etc.).  If we have that, then the ALv2 section 5
covers us legally.

The ASF requires an ICLA for all *committers* to cover submissions which are
committed directly into an Apache repo, but that's different.

Nevertheless, it's considered best practice to obtain additional documentation
from the contributor for large contributions, where "large" is not precisely
defined.  That documentation typically takes the form of a CLA or a software
grant.

So by establishing a hard requirement for an ICLA for *all* non-trivial
contributions, Cordova would actually be going further than is required by
Apache.  That might be a sound policy considering how active Cordova is, and
it's SOP at other places like the Eclipse Foundation.  What we definitely
would like to avoid is integrating important contributions from somebody
clueless submitting stuff they don't own or somebody whose identity is not
known.  Requiring an ICLA up front would guard against that, at the cost of
raising the barrier to entry.

HTH,

Marvin Humphrey

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