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From ste...@apache.org
Subject [06/51] [abbrv] [partial] cordova-lib git commit: CB-11980: added missing node modules for test fixtures
Date Wed, 07 Jun 2017 06:03:57 GMT
http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cordova-lib/blob/cef2959c/spec-plugman/projects/android/cordova/node_modules/q/README.md
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+[![Build Status](https://secure.travis-ci.org/kriskowal/q.svg?branch=master)](http://travis-ci.org/kriskowal/q)
+[![CDNJS](https://img.shields.io/cdnjs/v/q.js.svg)](https://cdnjs.com/libraries/q.js)
+
+<a href="http://promises-aplus.github.com/promises-spec">
+    <img src="http://kriskowal.github.io/q/q.png" align="right" alt="Q logo" />
+</a>
+
+If a function cannot return a value or throw an exception without
+blocking, it can return a promise instead.  A promise is an object
+that represents the return value or the thrown exception that the
+function may eventually provide.  A promise can also be used as a
+proxy for a [remote object][Q-Connection] to overcome latency.
+
+[Q-Connection]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q-connection
+
+On the first pass, promises can mitigate the “[Pyramid of
+Doom][POD]”: the situation where code marches to the right faster
+than it marches forward.
+
+[POD]: http://calculist.org/blog/2011/12/14/why-coroutines-wont-work-on-the-web/
+
+```javascript
+step1(function (value1) {
+    step2(value1, function(value2) {
+        step3(value2, function(value3) {
+            step4(value3, function(value4) {
+                // Do something with value4
+            });
+        });
+    });
+});
+```
+
+With a promise library, you can flatten the pyramid.
+
+```javascript
+Q.fcall(promisedStep1)
+.then(promisedStep2)
+.then(promisedStep3)
+.then(promisedStep4)
+.then(function (value4) {
+    // Do something with value4
+})
+.catch(function (error) {
+    // Handle any error from all above steps
+})
+.done();
+```
+
+With this approach, you also get implicit error propagation, just like `try`,
+`catch`, and `finally`.  An error in `promisedStep1` will flow all the way to
+the `catch` function, where it’s caught and handled.  (Here `promisedStepN` is
+a version of `stepN` that returns a promise.)
+
+The callback approach is called an “inversion of control”.
+A function that accepts a callback instead of a return value
+is saying, “Don’t call me, I’ll call you.”.  Promises
+[un-invert][IOC] the inversion, cleanly separating the input
+arguments from control flow arguments.  This simplifies the
+use and creation of API’s, particularly variadic,
+rest and spread arguments.
+
+[IOC]: http://www.slideshare.net/domenicdenicola/callbacks-promises-and-coroutines-oh-my-the-evolution-of-asynchronicity-in-javascript
+
+
+## Getting Started
+
+The Q module can be loaded as:
+
+-   A ``<script>`` tag (creating a ``Q`` global variable): ~2.5 KB minified and
+    gzipped.
+-   A Node.js and CommonJS module, available in [npm](https://npmjs.org/) as
+    the [q](https://npmjs.org/package/q) package
+-   An AMD module
+-   A [component](https://github.com/component/component) as ``microjs/q``
+-   Using [bower](http://bower.io/) as `q#^1.4.1`
+-   Using [NuGet](http://nuget.org/) as [Q](https://nuget.org/packages/q)
+
+Q can exchange promises with jQuery, Dojo, When.js, WinJS, and more.
+
+## Resources
+
+Our [wiki][] contains a number of useful resources, including:
+
+- A method-by-method [Q API reference][reference].
+- A growing [examples gallery][examples], showing how Q can be used to make
+  everything better. From XHR to database access to accessing the Flickr API,
+  Q is there for you.
+- There are many libraries that produce and consume Q promises for everything
+  from file system/database access or RPC to templating. For a list of some of
+  the more popular ones, see [Libraries][].
+- If you want materials that introduce the promise concept generally, and the
+  below tutorial isn't doing it for you, check out our collection of
+  [presentations, blog posts, and podcasts][resources].
+- A guide for those [coming from jQuery's `$.Deferred`][jquery].
+
+We'd also love to have you join the Q-Continuum [mailing list][].
+
+[wiki]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki
+[reference]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/API-Reference
+[examples]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/Examples-Gallery
+[Libraries]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/Libraries
+[resources]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/General-Promise-Resources
+[jquery]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/Coming-from-jQuery
+[mailing list]: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/q-continuum
+
+
+## Tutorial
+
+Promises have a ``then`` method, which you can use to get the eventual
+return value (fulfillment) or thrown exception (rejection).
+
+```javascript
+promiseMeSomething()
+.then(function (value) {
+}, function (reason) {
+});
+```
+
+If ``promiseMeSomething`` returns a promise that gets fulfilled later
+with a return value, the first function (the fulfillment handler) will be
+called with the value.  However, if the ``promiseMeSomething`` function
+gets rejected later by a thrown exception, the second function (the
+rejection handler) will be called with the exception.
+
+Note that resolution of a promise is always asynchronous: that is, the
+fulfillment or rejection handler will always be called in the next turn of the
+event loop (i.e. `process.nextTick` in Node). This gives you a nice
+guarantee when mentally tracing the flow of your code, namely that
+``then`` will always return before either handler is executed.
+
+In this tutorial, we begin with how to consume and work with promises. We'll
+talk about how to create them, and thus create functions like
+`promiseMeSomething` that return promises, [below](#the-beginning).
+
+
+### Propagation
+
+The ``then`` method returns a promise, which in this example, I’m
+assigning to ``outputPromise``.
+
+```javascript
+var outputPromise = getInputPromise()
+.then(function (input) {
+}, function (reason) {
+});
+```
+
+The ``outputPromise`` variable becomes a new promise for the return
+value of either handler.  Since a function can only either return a
+value or throw an exception, only one handler will ever be called and it
+will be responsible for resolving ``outputPromise``.
+
+-   If you return a value in a handler, ``outputPromise`` will get
+    fulfilled.
+
+-   If you throw an exception in a handler, ``outputPromise`` will get
+    rejected.
+
+-   If you return a **promise** in a handler, ``outputPromise`` will
+    “become” that promise.  Being able to become a new promise is useful
+    for managing delays, combining results, or recovering from errors.
+
+If the ``getInputPromise()`` promise gets rejected and you omit the
+rejection handler, the **error** will go to ``outputPromise``:
+
+```javascript
+var outputPromise = getInputPromise()
+.then(function (value) {
+});
+```
+
+If the input promise gets fulfilled and you omit the fulfillment handler, the
+**value** will go to ``outputPromise``:
+
+```javascript
+var outputPromise = getInputPromise()
+.then(null, function (error) {
+});
+```
+
+Q promises provide a ``fail`` shorthand for ``then`` when you are only
+interested in handling the error:
+
+```javascript
+var outputPromise = getInputPromise()
+.fail(function (error) {
+});
+```
+
+If you are writing JavaScript for modern engines only or using
+CoffeeScript, you may use `catch` instead of `fail`.
+
+Promises also have a ``fin`` function that is like a ``finally`` clause.
+The final handler gets called, with no arguments, when the promise
+returned by ``getInputPromise()`` either returns a value or throws an
+error.  The value returned or error thrown by ``getInputPromise()``
+passes directly to ``outputPromise`` unless the final handler fails, and
+may be delayed if the final handler returns a promise.
+
+```javascript
+var outputPromise = getInputPromise()
+.fin(function () {
+    // close files, database connections, stop servers, conclude tests
+});
+```
+
+-   If the handler returns a value, the value is ignored
+-   If the handler throws an error, the error passes to ``outputPromise``
+-   If the handler returns a promise, ``outputPromise`` gets postponed.  The
+    eventual value or error has the same effect as an immediate return
+    value or thrown error: a value would be ignored, an error would be
+    forwarded.
+
+If you are writing JavaScript for modern engines only or using
+CoffeeScript, you may use `finally` instead of `fin`.
+
+### Chaining
+
+There are two ways to chain promises.  You can chain promises either
+inside or outside handlers.  The next two examples are equivalent.
+
+```javascript
+return getUsername()
+.then(function (username) {
+    return getUser(username)
+    .then(function (user) {
+        // if we get here without an error,
+        // the value returned here
+        // or the exception thrown here
+        // resolves the promise returned
+        // by the first line
+    })
+});
+```
+
+```javascript
+return getUsername()
+.then(function (username) {
+    return getUser(username);
+})
+.then(function (user) {
+    // if we get here without an error,
+    // the value returned here
+    // or the exception thrown here
+    // resolves the promise returned
+    // by the first line
+});
+```
+
+The only difference is nesting.  It’s useful to nest handlers if you
+need to capture multiple input values in your closure.
+
+```javascript
+function authenticate() {
+    return getUsername()
+    .then(function (username) {
+        return getUser(username);
+    })
+    // chained because we will not need the user name in the next event
+    .then(function (user) {
+        return getPassword()
+        // nested because we need both user and password next
+        .then(function (password) {
+            if (user.passwordHash !== hash(password)) {
+                throw new Error("Can't authenticate");
+            }
+        });
+    });
+}
+```
+
+
+### Combination
+
+You can turn an array of promises into a promise for the whole,
+fulfilled array using ``all``.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.all([
+    eventualAdd(2, 2),
+    eventualAdd(10, 20)
+]);
+```
+
+If you have a promise for an array, you can use ``spread`` as a
+replacement for ``then``.  The ``spread`` function “spreads” the
+values over the arguments of the fulfillment handler.  The rejection handler
+will get called at the first sign of failure.  That is, whichever of
+the received promises fails first gets handled by the rejection handler.
+
+```javascript
+function eventualAdd(a, b) {
+    return Q.spread([a, b], function (a, b) {
+        return a + b;
+    })
+}
+```
+
+But ``spread`` calls ``all`` initially, so you can skip it in chains.
+
+```javascript
+return getUsername()
+.then(function (username) {
+    return [username, getUser(username)];
+})
+.spread(function (username, user) {
+});
+```
+
+The ``all`` function returns a promise for an array of values.  When this
+promise is fulfilled, the array contains the fulfillment values of the original
+promises, in the same order as those promises.  If one of the given promises
+is rejected, the returned promise is immediately rejected, not waiting for the
+rest of the batch.  If you want to wait for all of the promises to either be
+fulfilled or rejected, you can use ``allSettled``.
+
+```javascript
+Q.allSettled(promises)
+.then(function (results) {
+    results.forEach(function (result) {
+        if (result.state === "fulfilled") {
+            var value = result.value;
+        } else {
+            var reason = result.reason;
+        }
+    });
+});
+```
+
+The ``any`` function accepts an array of promises and returns a promise that is
+fulfilled by the first given promise to be fulfilled, or rejected if all of the
+given promises are rejected.
+
+```javascript
+Q.any(promises)
+.then(function (first) {
+    // Any of the promises was fulfilled.
+}, function (error) {
+    // All of the promises were rejected.
+});
+```
+
+### Sequences
+
+If you have a number of promise-producing functions that need
+to be run sequentially, you can of course do so manually:
+
+```javascript
+return foo(initialVal).then(bar).then(baz).then(qux);
+```
+
+However, if you want to run a dynamically constructed sequence of
+functions, you'll want something like this:
+
+```javascript
+var funcs = [foo, bar, baz, qux];
+
+var result = Q(initialVal);
+funcs.forEach(function (f) {
+    result = result.then(f);
+});
+return result;
+```
+
+You can make this slightly more compact using `reduce`:
+
+```javascript
+return funcs.reduce(function (soFar, f) {
+    return soFar.then(f);
+}, Q(initialVal));
+```
+
+Or, you could use the ultra-compact version:
+
+```javascript
+return funcs.reduce(Q.when, Q(initialVal));
+```
+
+### Handling Errors
+
+One sometimes-unintuitive aspect of promises is that if you throw an
+exception in the fulfillment handler, it will not be caught by the error
+handler.
+
+```javascript
+return foo()
+.then(function (value) {
+    throw new Error("Can't bar.");
+}, function (error) {
+    // We only get here if "foo" fails
+});
+```
+
+To see why this is, consider the parallel between promises and
+``try``/``catch``. We are ``try``-ing to execute ``foo()``: the error
+handler represents a ``catch`` for ``foo()``, while the fulfillment handler
+represents code that happens *after* the ``try``/``catch`` block.
+That code then needs its own ``try``/``catch`` block.
+
+In terms of promises, this means chaining your rejection handler:
+
+```javascript
+return foo()
+.then(function (value) {
+    throw new Error("Can't bar.");
+})
+.fail(function (error) {
+    // We get here with either foo's error or bar's error
+});
+```
+
+### Progress Notification
+
+It's possible for promises to report their progress, e.g. for tasks that take a
+long time like a file upload. Not all promises will implement progress
+notifications, but for those that do, you can consume the progress values using
+a third parameter to ``then``:
+
+```javascript
+return uploadFile()
+.then(function () {
+    // Success uploading the file
+}, function (err) {
+    // There was an error, and we get the reason for error
+}, function (progress) {
+    // We get notified of the upload's progress as it is executed
+});
+```
+
+Like `fail`, Q also provides a shorthand for progress callbacks
+called `progress`:
+
+```javascript
+return uploadFile().progress(function (progress) {
+    // We get notified of the upload's progress
+});
+```
+
+### The End
+
+When you get to the end of a chain of promises, you should either
+return the last promise or end the chain.  Since handlers catch
+errors, it’s an unfortunate pattern that the exceptions can go
+unobserved.
+
+So, either return it,
+
+```javascript
+return foo()
+.then(function () {
+    return "bar";
+});
+```
+
+Or, end it.
+
+```javascript
+foo()
+.then(function () {
+    return "bar";
+})
+.done();
+```
+
+Ending a promise chain makes sure that, if an error doesn’t get
+handled before the end, it will get rethrown and reported.
+
+This is a stopgap. We are exploring ways to make unhandled errors
+visible without any explicit handling.
+
+
+### The Beginning
+
+Everything above assumes you get a promise from somewhere else.  This
+is the common case.  Every once in a while, you will need to create a
+promise from scratch.
+
+#### Using ``Q.fcall``
+
+You can create a promise from a value using ``Q.fcall``.  This returns a
+promise for 10.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(function () {
+    return 10;
+});
+```
+
+You can also use ``fcall`` to get a promise for an exception.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(function () {
+    throw new Error("Can't do it");
+});
+```
+
+As the name implies, ``fcall`` can call functions, or even promised
+functions.  This uses the ``eventualAdd`` function above to add two
+numbers.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(eventualAdd, 2, 2);
+```
+
+
+#### Using Deferreds
+
+If you have to interface with asynchronous functions that are callback-based
+instead of promise-based, Q provides a few shortcuts (like ``Q.nfcall`` and
+friends). But much of the time, the solution will be to use *deferreds*.
+
+```javascript
+var deferred = Q.defer();
+FS.readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8", function (error, text) {
+    if (error) {
+        deferred.reject(new Error(error));
+    } else {
+        deferred.resolve(text);
+    }
+});
+return deferred.promise;
+```
+
+Note that a deferred can be resolved with a value or a promise.  The
+``reject`` function is a shorthand for resolving with a rejected
+promise.
+
+```javascript
+// this:
+deferred.reject(new Error("Can't do it"));
+
+// is shorthand for:
+var rejection = Q.fcall(function () {
+    throw new Error("Can't do it");
+});
+deferred.resolve(rejection);
+```
+
+This is a simplified implementation of ``Q.delay``.
+
+```javascript
+function delay(ms) {
+    var deferred = Q.defer();
+    setTimeout(deferred.resolve, ms);
+    return deferred.promise;
+}
+```
+
+This is a simplified implementation of ``Q.timeout``
+
+```javascript
+function timeout(promise, ms) {
+    var deferred = Q.defer();
+    Q.when(promise, deferred.resolve);
+    delay(ms).then(function () {
+        deferred.reject(new Error("Timed out"));
+    });
+    return deferred.promise;
+}
+```
+
+Finally, you can send a progress notification to the promise with
+``deferred.notify``.
+
+For illustration, this is a wrapper for XML HTTP requests in the browser. Note
+that a more [thorough][XHR] implementation would be in order in practice.
+
+[XHR]: https://github.com/montagejs/mr/blob/71e8df99bb4f0584985accd6f2801ef3015b9763/browser.js#L29-L73
+
+```javascript
+function requestOkText(url) {
+    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
+    var deferred = Q.defer();
+
+    request.open("GET", url, true);
+    request.onload = onload;
+    request.onerror = onerror;
+    request.onprogress = onprogress;
+    request.send();
+
+    function onload() {
+        if (request.status === 200) {
+            deferred.resolve(request.responseText);
+        } else {
+            deferred.reject(new Error("Status code was " + request.status));
+        }
+    }
+
+    function onerror() {
+        deferred.reject(new Error("Can't XHR " + JSON.stringify(url)));
+    }
+
+    function onprogress(event) {
+        deferred.notify(event.loaded / event.total);
+    }
+
+    return deferred.promise;
+}
+```
+
+Below is an example of how to use this ``requestOkText`` function:
+
+```javascript
+requestOkText("http://localhost:3000")
+.then(function (responseText) {
+    // If the HTTP response returns 200 OK, log the response text.
+    console.log(responseText);
+}, function (error) {
+    // If there's an error or a non-200 status code, log the error.
+    console.error(error);
+}, function (progress) {
+    // Log the progress as it comes in.
+    console.log("Request progress: " + Math.round(progress * 100) + "%");
+});
+```
+
+#### Using `Q.Promise`
+
+This is an alternative promise-creation API that has the same power as
+the deferred concept, but without introducing another conceptual entity.
+
+Rewriting the `requestOkText` example above using `Q.Promise`:
+
+```javascript
+function requestOkText(url) {
+    return Q.Promise(function(resolve, reject, notify) {
+        var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
+
+        request.open("GET", url, true);
+        request.onload = onload;
+        request.onerror = onerror;
+        request.onprogress = onprogress;
+        request.send();
+
+        function onload() {
+            if (request.status === 200) {
+                resolve(request.responseText);
+            } else {
+                reject(new Error("Status code was " + request.status));
+            }
+        }
+
+        function onerror() {
+            reject(new Error("Can't XHR " + JSON.stringify(url)));
+        }
+
+        function onprogress(event) {
+            notify(event.loaded / event.total);
+        }
+    });
+}
+```
+
+If `requestOkText` were to throw an exception, the returned promise would be
+rejected with that thrown exception as the rejection reason.
+
+### The Middle
+
+If you are using a function that may return a promise, but just might
+return a value if it doesn’t need to defer, you can use the “static”
+methods of the Q library.
+
+The ``when`` function is the static equivalent for ``then``.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.when(valueOrPromise, function (value) {
+}, function (error) {
+});
+```
+
+All of the other methods on a promise have static analogs with the
+same name.
+
+The following are equivalent:
+
+```javascript
+return Q.all([a, b]);
+```
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(function () {
+    return [a, b];
+})
+.all();
+```
+
+When working with promises provided by other libraries, you should
+convert it to a Q promise.  Not all promise libraries make the same
+guarantees as Q and certainly don’t provide all of the same methods.
+Most libraries only provide a partially functional ``then`` method.
+This thankfully is all we need to turn them into vibrant Q promises.
+
+```javascript
+return Q($.ajax(...))
+.then(function () {
+});
+```
+
+If there is any chance that the promise you receive is not a Q promise
+as provided by your library, you should wrap it using a Q function.
+You can even use ``Q.invoke`` as a shorthand.
+
+```javascript
+return Q.invoke($, 'ajax', ...)
+.then(function () {
+});
+```
+
+
+### Over the Wire
+
+A promise can serve as a proxy for another object, even a remote
+object.  There are methods that allow you to optimistically manipulate
+properties or call functions.  All of these interactions return
+promises, so they can be chained.
+
+```
+direct manipulation         using a promise as a proxy
+--------------------------  -------------------------------
+value.foo                   promise.get("foo")
+value.foo = value           promise.put("foo", value)
+delete value.foo            promise.del("foo")
+value.foo(...args)          promise.post("foo", [args])
+value.foo(...args)          promise.invoke("foo", ...args)
+value(...args)              promise.fapply([args])
+value(...args)              promise.fcall(...args)
+```
+
+If the promise is a proxy for a remote object, you can shave
+round-trips by using these functions instead of ``then``.  To take
+advantage of promises for remote objects, check out [Q-Connection][].
+
+[Q-Connection]: https://github.com/kriskowal/q-connection
+
+Even in the case of non-remote objects, these methods can be used as
+shorthand for particularly-simple fulfillment handlers. For example, you
+can replace
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(function () {
+    return [{ foo: "bar" }, { foo: "baz" }];
+})
+.then(function (value) {
+    return value[0].foo;
+});
+```
+
+with
+
+```javascript
+return Q.fcall(function () {
+    return [{ foo: "bar" }, { foo: "baz" }];
+})
+.get(0)
+.get("foo");
+```
+
+
+### Adapting Node
+
+If you're working with functions that make use of the Node.js callback pattern,
+where callbacks are in the form of `function(err, result)`, Q provides a few
+useful utility functions for converting between them. The most straightforward
+are probably `Q.nfcall` and `Q.nfapply` ("Node function call/apply") for calling
+Node.js-style functions and getting back a promise:
+
+```javascript
+return Q.nfcall(FS.readFile, "foo.txt", "utf-8");
+return Q.nfapply(FS.readFile, ["foo.txt", "utf-8"]);
+```
+
+If you are working with methods, instead of simple functions, you can easily
+run in to the usual problems where passing a method to another function—like
+`Q.nfcall`—"un-binds" the method from its owner. To avoid this, you can either
+use `Function.prototype.bind` or some nice shortcut methods we provide:
+
+```javascript
+return Q.ninvoke(redisClient, "get", "user:1:id");
+return Q.npost(redisClient, "get", ["user:1:id"]);
+```
+
+You can also create reusable wrappers with `Q.denodeify` or `Q.nbind`:
+
+```javascript
+var readFile = Q.denodeify(FS.readFile);
+return readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8");
+
+var redisClientGet = Q.nbind(redisClient.get, redisClient);
+return redisClientGet("user:1:id");
+```
+
+Finally, if you're working with raw deferred objects, there is a
+`makeNodeResolver` method on deferreds that can be handy:
+
+```javascript
+var deferred = Q.defer();
+FS.readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8", deferred.makeNodeResolver());
+return deferred.promise;
+```
+
+### Long Stack Traces
+
+Q comes with optional support for “long stack traces,” wherein the `stack`
+property of `Error` rejection reasons is rewritten to be traced along
+asynchronous jumps instead of stopping at the most recent one. As an example:
+
+```js
+function theDepthsOfMyProgram() {
+  Q.delay(100).done(function explode() {
+    throw new Error("boo!");
+  });
+}
+
+theDepthsOfMyProgram();
+```
+
+usually would give a rather unhelpful stack trace looking something like
+
+```
+Error: boo!
+    at explode (/path/to/test.js:3:11)
+    at _fulfilled (/path/to/test.js:q:54)
+    at resolvedValue.promiseDispatch.done (/path/to/q.js:823:30)
+    at makePromise.promise.promiseDispatch (/path/to/q.js:496:13)
+    at pending (/path/to/q.js:397:39)
+    at process.startup.processNextTick.process._tickCallback (node.js:244:9)
+```
+
+But, if you turn this feature on by setting
+
+```js
+Q.longStackSupport = true;
+```
+
+then the above code gives a nice stack trace to the tune of
+
+```
+Error: boo!
+    at explode (/path/to/test.js:3:11)
+From previous event:
+    at theDepthsOfMyProgram (/path/to/test.js:2:16)
+    at Object.<anonymous> (/path/to/test.js:7:1)
+```
+
+Note how you can see the function that triggered the async operation in the
+stack trace! This is very helpful for debugging, as otherwise you end up getting
+only the first line, plus a bunch of Q internals, with no sign of where the
+operation started.
+
+In node.js, this feature can also be enabled through the Q_DEBUG environment
+variable:
+
+```
+Q_DEBUG=1 node server.js
+```
+
+This will enable long stack support in every instance of Q.
+
+This feature does come with somewhat-serious performance and memory overhead,
+however. If you're working with lots of promises, or trying to scale a server
+to many users, you should probably keep it off. But in development, go for it!
+
+## Tests
+
+You can view the results of the Q test suite [in your browser][tests]!
+
+[tests]: https://rawgithub.com/kriskowal/q/v1/spec/q-spec.html
+
+## License
+
+Copyright 2009–2017 Kristopher Michael Kowal and contributors
+MIT License (enclosed)
+

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cordova-lib/blob/cef2959c/spec-plugman/projects/android/cordova/node_modules/q/package.json
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/spec-plugman/projects/android/cordova/node_modules/q/package.json b/spec-plugman/projects/android/cordova/node_modules/q/package.json
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9f04064
--- /dev/null
+++ b/spec-plugman/projects/android/cordova/node_modules/q/package.json
@@ -0,0 +1,155 @@
+{
+  "_args": [
+    [
+      {
+        "raw": "q@^1.4.1",
+        "scope": null,
+        "escapedName": "q",
+        "name": "q",
+        "rawSpec": "^1.4.1",
+        "spec": ">=1.4.1 <2.0.0",
+        "type": "range"
+      },
+      "/Users/steveng/repo/cordova/cordova-android"
+    ]
+  ],
+  "_from": "q@>=1.4.1 <2.0.0",
+  "_id": "q@1.5.0",
+  "_inCache": true,
+  "_location": "/cordova-android/q",
+  "_nodeVersion": "6.9.5",
+  "_npmOperationalInternal": {
+    "host": "packages-18-east.internal.npmjs.com",
+    "tmp": "tmp/q-1.5.0.tgz_1490148893963_0.4695124195422977"
+  },
+  "_npmUser": {
+    "name": "kriskowal",
+    "email": "kris.kowal@cixar.com"
+  },
+  "_npmVersion": "3.10.10",
+  "_phantomChildren": {},
+  "_requested": {
+    "raw": "q@^1.4.1",
+    "scope": null,
+    "escapedName": "q",
+    "name": "q",
+    "rawSpec": "^1.4.1",
+    "spec": ">=1.4.1 <2.0.0",
+    "type": "range"
+  },
+  "_requiredBy": [
+    "/cordova-android",
+    "/cordova-android/cordova-common"
+  ],
+  "_resolved": "http://registry.npmjs.org/q/-/q-1.5.0.tgz",
+  "_shasum": "dd01bac9d06d30e6f219aecb8253ee9ebdc308f1",
+  "_shrinkwrap": null,
+  "_spec": "q@^1.4.1",
+  "_where": "/Users/steveng/repo/cordova/cordova-android",
+  "author": {
+    "name": "Kris Kowal",
+    "email": "kris@cixar.com",
+    "url": "https://github.com/kriskowal"
+  },
+  "bugs": {
+    "url": "http://github.com/kriskowal/q/issues"
+  },
+  "contributors": [
+    {
+      "name": "Kris Kowal",
+      "email": "kris@cixar.com",
+      "url": "https://github.com/kriskowal"
+    },
+    {
+      "name": "Irakli Gozalishvili",
+      "email": "rfobic@gmail.com",
+      "url": "http://jeditoolkit.com"
+    },
+    {
+      "name": "Domenic Denicola",
+      "email": "domenic@domenicdenicola.com",
+      "url": "http://domenicdenicola.com"
+    }
+  ],
+  "dependencies": {},
+  "description": "A library for promises (CommonJS/Promises/A,B,D)",
+  "devDependencies": {
+    "cover": "*",
+    "grunt": "~0.4.1",
+    "grunt-cli": "~0.1.9",
+    "grunt-contrib-uglify": "~0.9.1",
+    "jasmine-node": "1.11.0",
+    "jshint": "~2.1.9",
+    "matcha": "~0.2.0",
+    "opener": "*",
+    "promises-aplus-tests": "1.x"
+  },
+  "directories": {
+    "test": "./spec"
+  },
+  "dist": {
+    "shasum": "dd01bac9d06d30e6f219aecb8253ee9ebdc308f1",
+    "tarball": "https://registry.npmjs.org/q/-/q-1.5.0.tgz"
+  },
+  "engines": {
+    "node": ">=0.6.0",
+    "teleport": ">=0.2.0"
+  },
+  "files": [
+    "LICENSE",
+    "q.js",
+    "queue.js"
+  ],
+  "gitHead": "4fecabe07ff9f3683a3d4548e7f81c2aba693326",
+  "homepage": "https://github.com/kriskowal/q",
+  "keywords": [
+    "q",
+    "promise",
+    "promises",
+    "promises-a",
+    "promises-aplus",
+    "deferred",
+    "future",
+    "async",
+    "flow control",
+    "fluent",
+    "browser",
+    "node"
+  ],
+  "license": "MIT",
+  "main": "q.js",
+  "maintainers": [
+    {
+      "name": "kriskowal",
+      "email": "kris.kowal@cixar.com"
+    },
+    {
+      "name": "domenic",
+      "email": "domenic@domenicdenicola.com"
+    }
+  ],
+  "name": "q",
+  "optionalDependencies": {},
+  "overlay": {
+    "teleport": {
+      "dependencies": {
+        "system": ">=0.0.4"
+      }
+    }
+  },
+  "readme": "ERROR: No README data found!",
+  "repository": {
+    "type": "git",
+    "url": "git://github.com/kriskowal/q.git"
+  },
+  "scripts": {
+    "benchmark": "matcha",
+    "cover": "cover run jasmine-node spec && cover report html && opener
cover_html/index.html",
+    "lint": "jshint q.js",
+    "minify": "grunt",
+    "prepublish": "grunt",
+    "test": "npm ls -s && jasmine-node spec && promises-aplus-tests spec/aplus-adapter
&& npm run -s lint",
+    "test-browser": "opener spec/q-spec.html"
+  },
+  "version": "1.5.0"
+}


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