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From Stephen Williams <...@lig.net>
Subject Re: Release hell WAS: [VOTE] Release Apache Commons Codec 1.5-RC1
Date Wed, 30 Mar 2011 02:24:30 GMT
On 3/29/11 6:36 PM, Gary Gregory wrote:
> Wait! I'm not done or I'm loosing my marbles...

...
As I noticed this note, seems like a good point to interject a Maven war story:

I do not like Maven.  I know I should, but it seems too complicated and too hard to use on
complex projects.  I may get over it, 
when I have a good reason.  I'm living in CMake land now, compiling C++ and Java code, and
(using JavaGlue (a fork of XBiG)) 
generating, compiling, and linking Java->C++ code for native and Android apps.  It seems
much cleaner, handles cross-platform very 
well, and it is easier to avoid ant/gmake/maven spaghetti code.  Not as powerful as Maven
probably, but easier for most project use.

A bit over a year ago I was on a project that had way too much code (class diarrhea (600+
for a 3 tier application) etc.) written by 
a Russian off-shore team.  They had a long-running and memory hog (6+GB!) Maven build.  At
runtime, various OSGi bits were used to 
tie the application together, mainly meaning that it was impossible to follow the whole flow
to figure out how certain parts of the 
app were triggered.  And there was no detailed documentation and they refused to refactor.

Anyway, at one point I'd written a good chunk of code using Google Protocol buffers in a message-oriented
way (the code assumes 
synchronous RPC) using the nice Apache Netty framework.  Plus we used RabbitMQ on another
tier.  Grudgingly following the (wrong!) 
project rule of not checking in things until they were working, I finished a complete version.
 After testing, I decided to dig into 
integrating the build of that module into Maven.  Noticing that Eclipse had a 'create Maven
project file' (or something like that), 
I figured I'd give it a try.  Assuming that build errors would lead me to the next step, I
asked Eclipse for a project build.

Every buffer my mouse ran over in Eclipse blanked.  What?  Wait!  Arghh...  The first thing
the generated Maven build did was to 
delete all of my source code.  I've used a lot of build systems for a lot of years, but didn't
anticipate that possibility.  I 
checked all tmp, cache, and other areas.  No trace of any source code.

So, in shock and not happy for half a day, kicking myself for not making copies in a dozen
places, I started being resigned to 
writing the code from scratch.  Probably I would remember most of the difficult solutions.

Then, I noticed that the class files were still there.  (Delete the source code but not the
class files?  Perverted!)  For about a 
day, I tried all of the Java decompilers that I could find.  Most of them couldn't handle
JDK1.5 class files.  Finally, one worked 
almost perfectly and I recovered over 98% of my code.  No comments of course, and its a good
thing we weren't obfuscating at that point.

So, lesson learned: Don't use Maven!  ;-)
No, the other one: make copies of your code through multiple means until it is completely
safe.  I hadn't lost code (or any data 
through paranoid backups that have survived about 20 hard drive failures over the years) for
a long time.  It will be a very long 
time before it happens again.

sdw
-- 
Stephen D. Williams sdw@lig.net stephendwilliams@gmail.com LinkedIn: http://sdw.st/in V:650-450-UNIX
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