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From hus...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs tutorial.xml faq.xml
Date Fri, 18 Oct 2002 00:34:06 GMT
husted      2002/10/17 17:34:06

  Modified:    jelly/xdocs tutorial.xml faq.xml
  Log:
  Minor typo fixes, per chat with James Strachan
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.3       +17 -17    jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/tutorial.xml
  
  Index: tutorial.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/tutorial.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- tutorial.xml	30 Sep 2002 07:31:56 -0000	1.2
  +++ tutorial.xml	18 Oct 2002 00:34:05 -0000	1.3
  @@ -19,8 +19,8 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -Before going any further it might be worth checking out the 
  -<a href="gettingstarted.html">Getting Started</a> guide.
  +If you don't have Maven installed, you should check out the
  +<a href="gettingstarted.html">Getting Started</a> guide first.
   </p>
   
   <p>
  @@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
   Once you have tried a few of demos, you can explore Jelly further by writing
   some Jelly scripts on your own, or by modifying some of the demos provided.
   You may also want to define your own Jelly taglib, and in some cases
  -you may want to know how to embed Jelly into your own Java program (tutorials 
  +you may want to know how to embed Jelly into your own Java program (tutorials
   on how to do these things are in the works).
   </p>
   
  @@ -75,7 +75,7 @@
   
   <p>
   Why would you want to do this? If you have ever written a large Swing
  -application, you will probably agree that coding a GUI in java can be a tedious task. 
  +application, you will probably agree that coding a GUI in java can be a tedious task.
   Jelly allows you to define the View (in an MVC approach)
   in XML and bind it to a Model and Controller written in Java. Or you can
   define actions (Controller) directly in Jelly by using the &lt;action&gt; tag.
  @@ -88,7 +88,7 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -To run the swing demo type "maven demo:swing" 
  +To run the swing demo type "maven demo:swing"
   (View the <a href="http://cvs.apache.org/viewcvs.cgi/jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/src/test/org/apache/commons/jelly/swing/example.jelly?rev=HEAD">demo
script</a>). You should see a window open with
   some swing components. You can test the actions by selecting a menu item or
   pressing the button. The actions in this demo simply output a message to the
  @@ -161,7 +161,7 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -See the section on Embedding Jelly to find out more about the Homepage Builder demo. This
is also a good way to compare a Java implementation (HomepageBuilder.java) with a Jelly implementation
(HomepageBuilder.jelly). 
  +See the section on Embedding Jelly to find out more about the Homepage Builder demo. This
is also a good way to compare a Java implementation (HomepageBuilder.java) with a Jelly implementation
(HomepageBuilder.jelly).
   </p>
   
   </subsection>
  @@ -174,7 +174,7 @@
   (TreeModel, TableModel, etc) using Jelly.
   </li>
   <li>
  -You could allow the end user of an application to easily customize (or localize) the UI,
and even add 
  +You could allow the end user of an application to easily customize (or localize) the UI,
and even add
   custom actions from a library of possible actions!
   </li>
   <li>
  @@ -203,18 +203,18 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -The code that actually runs Jelly is the following. 
  +The code that actually runs Jelly is the following.
   </p>
   
   <pre>
  -	OutputStream output = new FileOutputStream("demopage.html");
  -	JellyContext context = new JellyContext();
  +    OutputStream output = new FileOutputStream("demopage.html");
  +    JellyContext context = new JellyContext();
           context.setVariable("name",nameField.getText());
  -        
  +
           //...set other context variables
  -	
  -	XMLOutput xmlOutput = XMLOutput.createXMLOutput(output);
  -	context.runScript("src/test/org/apache/commons/jelly/demos/"+template), xmlOutput);
  +
  +    XMLOutput xmlOutput = XMLOutput.createXMLOutput(output);
  +    context.runScript("src/test/org/apache/commons/jelly/demos/"+template), xmlOutput);
           xmlOutput.flush();
   </pre>
   
  @@ -245,7 +245,7 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -There are many good books and tutorials on XSLT, and since the concepts are the same, I
won't waste Jelly documentation space and time on this subject. 
  +There are many good books and tutorials on XSLT, and since the concepts are the same, I
won't waste Jelly documentation space and time on this subject.
   </p>
   
   
  @@ -263,11 +263,11 @@
   </p>
   
   <p>
  -As you can see in the demo script, parsing an HTML file is simple: 
  +As you can see in the demo script, parsing an HTML file is simple:
   </p>
   
   <pre>
  -	&lt;html:parse var="doc" html="index.html"/&gt;	
  +    &lt;html:parse var="doc" html="index.html"/&gt;
   </pre>
   
   <p>
  
  
  
  1.5       +35 -35    jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/faq.xml
  
  Index: faq.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/faq.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- faq.xml	27 Sep 2002 14:07:58 -0000	1.4
  +++ faq.xml	18 Oct 2002 00:34:05 -0000	1.5
  @@ -15,7 +15,7 @@
         questions regarding various aspects of Jelly.  These questions are
         typically asked over and over again on the mailing lists, as a
         courtesy to the developers, we ask that you read this document
  -      before posting to the mailing lists.  
  +      before posting to the mailing lists.
       </p>
       <p><strong>General</strong></p>
       <ol>
  @@ -65,11 +65,11 @@
             href="overview.html">Overview</a> documents for more detail.
           </dd>
         </dl>
  -      
  +
         <dl>
           <dt>
             <a name="why-called-jelly">
  -          	Why is this called Jelly?
  +            Why is this called Jelly?
             </a>
           </dt>
           <dd>
  @@ -86,8 +86,8 @@
             using ideas from JSP, JSTL, Velocity, Cocoon and Ant.
           </dd>
         </dl>
  -      
  -      
  +
  +
       </section>
       <section name="Using Jelly">
         <dl>
  @@ -99,7 +99,7 @@
           <dd>
             Firstly you need to create one or more tags, by deriving from TagSupport.
             Then create a TagLibrary class for your tags; typically all this does
  -          is register all the tags in your tag library and give them names.          
  +          is register all the tags in your tag library and give them names.
             Then you can use your new tag library by specifying the classname in
             a namespace URI. For example
           </dd>
  @@ -109,35 +109,35 @@
   &lt;j:jelly xmlns:j="jelly:core" xmlns:foo="jelly:com.acme.something.MyTagLibrary"&gt;
   
     &lt;foo:bar x="12&gt;
  -	something goes here
  +    something goes here
     &lt;/foo:bar&gt;
   
   &lt;/j:jelly&gt;
   </pre>
   </code>
           </dd>
  -        <dd>                
  +        <dd>
             Going forward we hope to provide an alias mechanism using the jar-extension
  -          mechanism used by JAXP so that a file could be placed on the classpath 
  -		  called <code>META-INF/services/org.apache.commons.jelly.foo</code> which
  -		  would contain the class name of the tag library (com.acme.something.MyTagLibrary)
  -		  then you could use it as follows, which would avoid using the class name in your scripts.
  +          mechanism used by JAXP so that a file could be placed on the classpath
  +          called <code>META-INF/services/org.apache.commons.jelly.foo</code>
which
  +          would contain the class name of the tag library (com.acme.something.MyTagLibrary)
  +          then you could use it as follows, which would avoid using the class name in your
scripts.
           </dd>
  -        <dd>                
  +        <dd>
   <code>
   <pre>
   &lt;j:jelly xmlns:j="jelly:core" xmlns:foo="jelly:foo"&gt;
   
     &lt;foo:bar x="12&gt;
  -	something goes here
  +    something goes here
     &lt;/foo:bar&gt;
   
   &lt;/j:jelly&gt;
   </pre>
   </code>
  -		</dd>
  +        </dd>
         </dl>
  -      
  +
         <dl>
           <dt>
             <a name="tag-attributes">
  @@ -150,22 +150,22 @@
             and the result of the expression will be passed into your Tag's setter method.
             For example if you had the following Tag...
           </dd>
  -        <dd>                
  +        <dd>
   <code>
   <pre>
   public class FooTag extends TagSupport {
     private String value;
  -		
  +
     public void setValue(String value) {
       this.value = value;
  -  
  -    
  +
  +
     .
   }</pre>
   </code>
  -				</dd>
  -        <dd>                
  -        Then if you were to use it like this...	
  +                </dd>
  +        <dd>
  +        Then if you were to use it like this...
   <code>
   <pre>
     &lt;my:foo value="${customer.fullName}"/&gt;
  @@ -181,14 +181,14 @@
   tag.doTag(output);
   </pre>
   </code>
  -			 </dd>
  +             </dd>
           <dd>
  -	        If ever you find that your Tag's bean property is not being set it could be that
your Tag is
  -	        not properly following the bean introspection naming conventions. 
  -	        For example do you have a method called getValue() or isValue() with the wrong
return type?
  -	        (In this discussion substitue 'value' for the name of your own property, it doesn't
have to be called 'value' :).
  -	        For more details of the introspection rules, please checkout the Java Bean specification.
  -			 </dd>
  +            If ever you find that your Tag's bean property is not being set it could be
that your Tag is
  +            not properly following the bean introspection naming conventions.
  +            For example do you have a method called getValue() or isValue() with the wrong
return type?
  +            (In this discussion substitute 'value' for the name of your own property, it
doesn't have to be called 'value' :).
  +            For more details of the introspection rules, please checkout the Java Bean
specification.
  +             </dd>
           <dd>
             It could be that you want to coerce the value of an expression to some special
type.
             For example if you want to evaluate the expression as an Iterator you can use
a property
  @@ -198,14 +198,14 @@
   <pre>
   public class FooTag extends TagSupport {
     private Expression value;
  -		
  +
     public void setValue(Expression value) {
       this.value = value;
     }
  -    
  +
     public void doTag(XMLOutput output) {
       Iterator iter = expression.evaluateAsIterator();
  -    		...
  +            ...
     }
   }</pre>
   </code>
  @@ -221,8 +221,8 @@
           </dt>
           <dd>
             Jelly uses Maven for its build system. So you should be able to build Jelly just
like
  -          any other Maven enabled project. Please see the 
  -          <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/turbine/maven/start/index.html">Maven</a>

  +          any other Maven enabled project. Please see the
  +          <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/turbine/maven/start/index.html">Maven</a>
             documentation for details.
           </dd>
         </dl>
  
  
  

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