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From jstrac...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs tutorial.xml gettingstarted.xml navigation.xml
Date Fri, 20 Sep 2002 13:44:38 GMT
jstrachan    2002/09/20 06:44:38

  Modified:    jelly/xdocs navigation.xml
  Added:       jelly/xdocs tutorial.xml gettingstarted.xml
  Log:
  Added Otto von Wachter's first cut of his excellent tutorial - many thanks Otto! - plus
a few getting started instructions
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.16      +3 -2      jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/navigation.xml
  
  Index: navigation.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/navigation.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.15
  retrieving revision 1.16
  diff -u -r1.15 -r1.16
  --- navigation.xml	9 Sep 2002 11:25:03 -0000	1.15
  +++ navigation.xml	20 Sep 2002 13:44:38 -0000	1.16
  @@ -8,21 +8,22 @@
       <menu name="Jelly">
         <item name="Overview"                href="/index.html"/>
         <item name="FAQ"                     href="/faq.html"/>
  +      <item name="Getting Started"         href="/gettingstarted.html"/>
  +      <item name="Tutorial"         	   href="/tutorial.html"/>
         <item name="Detail"                  href="/overview.html"/>
         <item name="Tag Reference"           href="/tags.html"/>
         <item name="Download"                href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-jelly/distributions/"/>
  -      <item name="To Do List"              href="/todo.html"/>
       </menu>
       <menu name="Community">
         <item name="News Blog"			         href="http://blogs.werken.com/projects/jelly/"/>
         <item name="IRC"					           href="/irc.html"/>
         <item name="Powered By"              href="/powered.html"/>
  +      <item name="To Do List"              href="/todo.html"/>
       </menu>
       <menu name="Libraries">
         <item name="JellyUnit"               href="/jellyunit.html"/>
         <item name="JellySwing"              href="/jellyswing.html"/>
       </menu>
  -    
       
       <menu name="Jakarta Community">
           <item name="Get Involved"           href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/getinvolved.html"/>
  
  
  
  1.1                  jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/tutorial.xml
  
  Index: tutorial.xml
  ===================================================================
  <?xml version="1.0"?>
  
  <document>
  
   <properties>
    <title>Jelly Tutorials</title>
    <author email="vonwao@yahoo.com">Otto von Wachter</author>
   </properties>
  
  <body>
  
  <section name="Jelly Tutorials">
  
  <p>
  The best way to get acquainted with Jelly, and get an idea what it can be
  used for, is to see it in action. So you want to get started as quickly as
  possible? Luckily for you Jelly comes with several demos that can be run
  from the command line using Maven.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Before going any further it might be worth checking out the <a href="gettingstarted.html">Getting
Started</a> guide.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  The goal of the tutorials is to guide you through running some of the Jelly
  demos and give you some ideas of other potential uses of Jelly (and
  hopefully make your first experience with Jelly enjoyable and fun).
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Once you have tried a few of demos, you can explore Jelly further by writing
  some Jelly scripts on your own, or by modifying some of the demos provided.
  You may also want to define your own Jelly taglib, and in some cases
  you may want to know how to embed Jelly into your own Java program (tutorials 
  on how to do these things are in the works).
  </p>
  
  <p>
  To see a list of the Jelly demos that you can run, type "maven -g" in the
  Jelly root directory (there should be a project.xml file there). Among the
  other maven goals, you will see the the demos available under the "demo"
  goal (incidentally, Maven is a project automation tool that uses Jelly as
  its xml processing engine, and Jelly in turn uses Maven as its build tool.
  Neat!)
  </p>
  
  <p>
  The following tutorials are currently available:
  </p>
  <ul>
  <li>
  <a href="#jellyswing">JellySwing Demo</a>
  </li>
  </ul>
  <br/>
  
  <a name="jellyswing"/>
  <section name="JellySwing Demo">
  
  
  <p>
  This demo shows how you can use Jelly (using the <a href="tags.html#jelly:jellyswing">JellySwing</a>
library) to build the UI for a Swing java program.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Why would you want to do this? If you have ever written a large Swing
  application, you will probably agree that coding a GUI in java can be a tedious task. 
  Jelly allows you to define the View (in an MVC approach)
  in XML and bind it to a Model and Controller written in Java. Or you can
  define actions (Controller) directly in Jelly by using the &lt;action&gt; tag.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Jelly is also a great way for a designer to prototype a UI and avoid the
  learning curve of Java. In fact, a designer could develop a full-featured
  application using a rich set of functions and beans exposed via jelly tags.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  To run the swing demo type "maven demo:swing" 
  (View the <a href="http://cvs.apache.org/viewcvs.cgi/jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/src/test/org/apache/commons/jelly/swing/example.jelly?rev=HEAD">demo
script</a>). You should see a window open with
  some swing components. You can test the actions by selecting a menu item or
  pressing the button. The actions in this demo simply output a message to the
  console. A more practical action could be to invoke a bean, call a script
  that opens another window, etc.
  </p>
  
  <p>
  If you look at the jelly code for this demo (link to the code), you will see
  that building a UI is pretty simple. For example, a menu bar is simply:
  </p>
  
  <pre>
      &lt;menuBar&gt;
        &lt;menu text="File"&gt;
          &lt;menuItem&gt;
            &lt;action name="New"&gt;
             ... some action ...
            &lt;/action&gt;
          &lt;/menuItem&gt;
        &lt;/menu&gt;
        ... more menus/menu items
      &lt;/menuBar&gt;
  </pre>
  
  <p>
  As you can see, nested elements are automatically added to parent components
  (unlike Java, where you have to call parent.add(child) ).
  </p>
  
  <p>
  For the table, you can see that it was added to the scrollPane using the
  "new" tag (from the jelly:core taglib):
  </p>
  
  <pre>
      &lt;scrollPane&gt;
        &lt;j:new className="org.apache.commons.jelly.swing.MyTableModel" var="tableModel"/&gt;
        &lt;table model="${tableModel}"/&gt;
      &lt;/scrollPane&gt;
  </pre>
  
  <p>
  The nice thing about this is that any component (or model in this case) that
  is not available in the JellySwing taglib or is too complex to express using
  Jelly, can be written in java and added by this method.
  </p>
  
  </section>
  
  <section name="Other Ideas for JellySwing">
  
  <ul>
  <li>
  You could write a taglib to allow you to bind data to various models
  (TreeModel, TableModel, etc) using Jelly.
  </li>
  <li>
  You could allow the end user of an application to easily customize (or localize) the UI,
and even add 
  custom actions from a library of possible actions!
  </li>
  <li>
  You could you use JellySwing implement a "thin client", so that the entire UI of an application
  can be downloaded from a web server at runtime. In some applications, this would provide
a lot of flexibility.
  </li>
  </ul>
  
  </section>
  
  </section>
  
  </body>
  
  </document>
  
  
  1.1                  jakarta-commons-sandbox/jelly/xdocs/gettingstarted.xml
  
  Index: gettingstarted.xml
  ===================================================================
  <?xml version="1.0"?>
  
  <document>
  
   <properties>
    <title>Getting Started</title>
    <author email="jstrachan@apache.org">James Strachan</author>
   </properties>
  
  <body>
  
  <section name="Getting Started">
  
  <p>
  The easiest way to get started with Jelly is to try out the <a href="tutorial.html">tutorials</a>.

  Before you try out any of the tutorials, you'll need to install Maven first.
  For more details on how to install Maven please refer to the 
  <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/turbine/maven/start/install.html">Maven documentation</a>
 	
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Here's a brief overview of what you need to do. 
  
  <ul>
  <li>
  Download a binary distribution of Maven.
  </li>
  <li>
  Set the environment variable MAVEN_HOME to point to where you installed Maven
  </li>
  <li>
  Change your PATH environment variable so that it points to MAVEN_HOME/bin
  </li>
  <li>
  Get a source distribution of Jelly. 
  The easiest way to do this is (until we have nightly builds working) is to grab a CVS checkout.
  Jelly currently resides in the jelly directory inside jakarta-commons-sandbox.
  There are instructions on performing CVS checkouts 
  <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/site/cvsindex.html">here</a>
  </li>
  </ul>
  </p>
  
  <p>
  To verify that your Maven installation is working, change directory into your <i>jelly</i>
directory 
  which should contain a <i>project.xml</i> file required by Maven. Then type
  </p>
  
  <pre>
  	maven test
  </pre>
  
  <p>
  This should download all the required jars required to build and run all the example Jelly
scripts,
  compile all the code and build and run all the unit test cases. 
  </p>
  
  <p>
  Once you've got this far, it might be time to try out one of the <a href="tutorial.html">tutorials</a>

  </p>
  
  </section>
  
  </body>
  
  </document>
  
  

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