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From da...@cocoon.zones.apache.org
Subject [DAISY] Updated: Overview
Date Thu, 11 Jan 2007 15:47:41 GMT
A document has been updated:

http://cocoon.zones.apache.org/daisy/documentation/1258.html

Document ID: 1258
Branch: main
Language: default
Name: Overview (unchanged)
Document Type: Cocoon Document (unchanged)
Updated on: 1/11/07 10:43:47 AM
Updated by: Carsten Ziegeler

A new version has been created, state: publish

Parts
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    <p>The main goal for the new Cocoon 2.2 configuration system is to avoid
    patching of any provided configuration file (If you're familiar with previous
    versions of Cocoon you might remember the patching of the cocoon.xconf or
--- web.xml to satisfy your project needs.)</p>
+++ web.xml to satisfy your project needs.) To reach this goal a new mechanism is
+++ used which provides features like automatic inclusion of configuration files,
+++ property handling and property replacement in configuration files.</p>
    
    <p>Cocoon is a framework consisting of many different components. All these
    components are managed by a component container. Starting with Cocoon 2.2 this
(11 equal lines skipped)
    
    <p>There are various ways to setup a Spring container (have a look at the Spring
    documentation), but we suggest to setup a Spring application context using the
--- context loader listener in your web.xml:</p>
+++ context loader listener in your <tt>web.xml</tt>. In addition, Cocoon requires
+++ to setup Spring's RequestContext. The easiest way is to add Spring's request
+++ context listener for this purpose. Have a look at the Spring documentation for
+++ alternative configurations.</p>
    
    <pre>  ...
      &lt;listener&gt;
        &lt;listener-class&gt;org.springframework.web.context.ContextLoaderListener&lt;/listener-class&gt;
      &lt;/listener&gt;
+++   &lt;listener&gt;
+++     &lt;listener-class&gt;org.springframework.web.context.request.RequestContextListener&lt;/listener-class&gt;
+++   &lt;/listener&gt;
+++   ...
    </pre>
    
    <p>This context listener is invoked by the servlet container on startup of your
    web application. By default the configuration for the application context is
--- read from the file "WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml". This is the place to add
--- the global Cocoon configuration. Cocoon uses the namespace authoring features of
--- Spring 2.0:</p>
+++ read from the file <tt>WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml</tt>. This is the place
to
+++ add the global Cocoon configuration. Cocoon uses the namespace authoring
+++ features of Spring 2.0:</p>
    
    <pre>&lt;beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans""
           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
(17 equal lines skipped)
    </pre>
    
    <p>The two elements shown above are required to get Cocoon up and running inside
--- your web application. The first one, "configurator:settings", initializes the
--- <a href="daisy:1303">Cocoon Spring-Configurator.</a> The second element,
--- "avalon:bridge", sets up the Spring-Avalon-Bridge. This bridge allows you to run
--- Avalon-based components in a Spring container; these Avalon components are
--- configured using the well-known Avalon-configuration files. And that's it.</p>
+++ your web application. The first one, <tt>configurator:settings</tt>, initializes
+++ the <a href="daisy:1304">Cocoon Spring-Configurator.</a> The second element,
+++ <tt>avalon:bridge</tt>, sets up the Spring-Avalon-Bridge. This bridge allows
you
+++ to run Avalon-based components in a Spring container; these Avalon components
+++ are configured using the well-known Avalon-configuration files. And that's it.
+++ </p>
    
    <p>These two innocent looking statements do a lot of work behind the scenes and
    add all necessary beans to the Spring application context. Once the application
(2 equal lines skipped)
    your web application framework by getting the Cocoon beans from the Spring
    application context.</p>
    
+++ <p>For more information on how to configure Cocoon, we suggest to read the
+++ documentation about the <a href="daisy:1304">Cocoon Spring Configurator</a>
+++ first and then continue with the other configuration documents.</p>
+++ 
    </body>
    </html>


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