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From Apache Wiki <wikidi...@apache.org>
Subject [Cocoon Wiki] Trivial Update of "SimpleModProxy" by MarkLundquist
Date Mon, 29 Aug 2005 19:30:39 GMT
Dear Wiki user,

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The following page has been changed by MarkLundquist:
http://wiki.apache.org/cocoon/SimpleModProxy

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  = Intro =
- ApacheModProxy is an excellent, in-depth article about why and how to use Apache HTTPD as
a reverse-proxy front-end to Cocoon applications.  It's also rather ''long'', so I'll summarize
it here and encourage you to read it if you're interested in the long version. 
+ ApacheModProxy is an excellent, in-depth article about why and how to use Apache HTTPD as
a reverse-proxy front-end to Cocoon applications.  That article is also rather ''long'', so
I'll summarize it here and encourage you to read it if you're interested in the long version.

  
  So, by way of summary... you want to run Apache in front of your servlet container.  The
reasons:
-  * "Zero port 80 downtime" — the user ''always'' gets some page served, even if the application
is down (rather than having their browser say, "could not connect");
+  * "Zero port 80 downtime" — the user ''always'' gets some page served, even if the application
is down (rather than having their browser say, "could not connect");
   * Much faster serving of static resources (e.g. images, CSS, client-side javascript, flash
pieces etc.);
-  * Security — Apache can start as root, bind to (the privileged) port 80, and then switch
to a non-privileged uid.  
+  * Security — Apache can start as root, bind to (the privileged) port 80, and then switch
to a non-privileged uid.  
  
  There's another compelling reason not discussed in ApacheModProxy, which is the ability
to run multiple servlet engines.  I'll discuss that later, but for now, let's get right  to
the good stuff!
  
@@ -27, +27 @@

  
  ''All'' the static content is contained in {{{static}}}.  That way,
   * Apache can serve it up with one simple rule, instead of a bunch of Rewrite``Rules matching
filename suffixes, etc.;
-  * Cocoon can still serve up all the static content without Apache, so I can do development
on my laptop where I do not want to have to screw around with Apache — I just point my browser
at localhost:''port'' and talk directly to the Cocoon instance (see "Serving Static Content"
below).
+  * Cocoon can still serve up all the static content without Apache, so I can do development
on my laptop where I do not want to have to screw around with Apache — I just point my
browser at localhost:''port'' and talk directly to the Cocoon instance (see "Serving Static
Content" below).
  
  So, all you might really need in your Apache configuration is
  {{{

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