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From stev...@outerthought.org
Subject [WIKI-UPDATE] FOP FOPTuningGuide Thu May 22 17:00:04 2003
Date Thu, 22 May 2003 15:00:04 GMT
Page: http://wiki.cocoondev.org/Wiki.jsp?page=FOP , version: 5 on Thu May 22 14:51:20 2003
by CalebRacey

- FOP can be very memmory hungry, your milleage will vary but a brief [FOPTuningGuide] may
help you to tune your system.
?                   -

+ FOP can be very memory hungry, your milleage will vary but a brief [FOPTuningGuide] may
help you to tune your system.


Page: http://wiki.cocoondev.org/Wiki.jsp?page=FOPTuningGuide , version: 3 on Thu May 22 14:53:07
2003 by CalebRacey

- Having played around with FOP transformations i have found that large xml/xhtml to PDF transformations
are very memory hungry. On a default tomcat install the transformations don't have to get
very large before the java virtual machine (JVM) runs out of memory (i think jvms defaul to
a max heap of 256m, i may be wrong).
+ Having played around with FOP transformations i have found that large xml/xhtml to PDF transformations
are very memory hungry. On a default tomcat install the transformations don't have to get
very large before the java virtual machine (JVM) runs out of memory (i think jvms default
to a max heap of 256m, i may be wrong).
?                                                                                        
                                                                                         
                                                                                         
             +

- This line tells tomcat to fire up in a JVM with 256meg  of memmory (-Xms) and that that
jvm can grow upto 1800meg (-Xmx). It also tells it to incrementaly garbage collect (-Xincgc)
so as not to slow down too much when it decides it needs to look through all its memmory heap
for stuff it can throw away. An Xmx of 1800m is about the maximum heap size you can have on
a windows or linux box as the jvm can't grow any larger [Java bug report|http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/bugParade/bugs/4435069.html].
You may be able to get up close to 4 gig on a 32 bit sparc box. I have no idea about 64 bit
systems. I have tested this with suns jdk, bea's ibm and blackdown and they all break close
to 1900m max heap size.
?                                                              -

+ This line tells tomcat to fire up in a JVM with 256meg  of memory (-Xms) and that that jvm
can grow upto 1800meg (-Xmx). It also tells it to incrementaly garbage collect (-Xincgc) so
as not to slow down too much when it decides it needs to look through all its memmory heap
for stuff it can throw away. An Xmx of 1800m is about the maximum heap size you can have on
a windows or linux box as the jvm can't grow any larger [Java bug report|http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/bugParade/bugs/4435069.html].
You may be able to get up close to 4 gig on a 32 bit sparc box. I have no idea about 64 bit
systems. I have tested this with suns jdk, bea's ibm and blackdown and they all break close
to 1900m max heap size.
- Unfortuantely there seems to be no way of predicting how much memory a FOP transformation
will need. It can vary depeneding on what your stylesheet looks like. For instance it is advised
on the mailing lists not to nest tables as tis greatly increases the size of the DOM tree
needed to represent your FO transformation.
?         -

+ Unfortunately there seems to be no way of predicting how much memory a FOP transformation
will need. It can vary depeneding on what your stylesheet looks like. For instance it is advised
on the mailing lists not to nest tables as this greatly increases the size of the DOM tree
needed to represent your FO transformation.
?        +                                                                               
                                                                                         
                                                     +




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