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From Karel Vervaeke <karel.verva...@pandora.be>
Subject Re: [RT] The perfect repository might be just under your eyes
Date Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:48:05 GMT
Tony Collen wrote:

> Stefano Mazzocchi wrote:
>
>> NO! that's the beauty
>>
>>  echo "application/xml" > /document/@mime-type
>>
>> Voila' ;-)
>>
>> Actually, even better
>>
>>  echo "xml" > /document/@syntax
>>  echo "text/xhtml" > /document/@mime-type
>>
>> because MIME is getting it all wrong with this stupid +xml by mixing 
>> concerns between the syntax and the semantics.
>>
>> Do you see the potential?
>>
>>> The obvious question is what happens when you try to do an xpath 
>>> expression on a file that is not XML.  Perhaps the filesystem module 
>>> would know enough to check for <?xml version="1.0"?> ?
>>
>>
>>
>> ARRRRRGGGG!
>>
>>>
>>> Lots of potential though :)  Maybe you could tie a service to a 
>>> virtual device.  Like /dev/xupdate or /dev/xalan, and output to > 
>>> STDOUT?
>>>
>>
>> That's much better talking, bro ;-)
>
>
> More RTing:
>
> Imagine having an XSL processor in the kernel:
>
> You could "execute" .xsl files, bypassing having to run a processor 
> manually.
>
> prompt$ page2html.xsl < input.xml > output.html 

making the above line work would be a piece of cake.
You can make (just about) anything executable: see 
documentation/java.txt in the kernel about making .class files 
executable. For .class files it's based on the CAFEBABE header - xsl is 
- roughly speaking - just around the corner when you get the hex 
equivalent of <?xml version="1.0"?> :)

http://www.google.com/search?q=xmlfs <-- people have thought about this 
before :)

>
>
> Borrowing the pipeline concept from Cocoon:
>
> prompt$ cat input.xml | page2foo.xsl | foo2bar.xsl | bar2html.xsl > 
> output.html 

>
>
> One could even invent files which are actually transformation 
> pipelines -- ones which you might not be able to directly edit (or 
> maybe be able to edit a transformation in the middle):
>
> prompt$ make-virtual-file-pipeline virtual.xml --generator=input.xml 
> --tranformers=page2foo.xsl;foo2html.xsl --serialize=text/xml
>
> Now you can just go
>
> prompt$ cat virtual.xml
>
> And get the output of the pipeline defined above, which you can then 
> link to other pipelines, etc.
>
> It's no wonder that this all fits in very well with what Cocoon does, 
> since Cocoon is patterned after this concept.  I'm sure if I stew on 
> this concept enough I'll come up with more ideas and uses.
>
> Tony
>
>
>
>



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