cocoon-dev mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From Mark Washeim <esa...@canuck.com>
Subject Re: merlot editor
Date Tue, 20 Jun 2000 18:00:22 GMT
on 20/6/00 8:30 am, Niclas Hedhman at niclas@localbar.com wrote:

> Stefano Mazzocchi wrote:
> 
>> Mark Washeim wrote:
>>> 
>>> http://www.merlotxml.org
>> 
>> (even if Merlot's idea of XML editing is totally opposite to mine...
>> well, I understand I'm a weirdo so I don't really count...)
> 
> I agree that the tree-based editor is not very easy, nor intuitive, to work
> with. And a lot of clicking is normally the result. I am sure the standard
> word
> processor view of documents are a better way to go, and the tree view is some
> "Page Source" option. Anyway, a bit off-topic here to discuss the ultimate XML
> editor.
> 
> Niclas
> 

Though i hate to say it, microsoft issued a small, non-validating xml editor
about 2 years ago which was just great... it did use a tree view but with
the ability to auto expand nodes as you tabbed through them such that you
could tab open nodes and then tab to the content node to edit very easily .
. .  I'll try to whip up one like it in java once I've finished with the
eurofootball site . . .

our editor also uses a tree, but depends on schema. in the main, depending
on the document, what you see first are the fields or selection affordances
for the top-most complex-type. What that means is, that you don't depend on
the tree, but rather a panel at a time, the more complex types. . .

so, for a complex-type composed of, for instance:
simple-type - addressOne
simple-type - addressTwo
simple-type - city
simple-type - province/county
simple-type - postalcode

you would see all those simple types (which don't contain any further nodes,
anyway) at once when clicking on the complex type's node (let's call it
address) . . .

I'm trying, I'm trying to get you guys a copy, were just really swamped!







-- 
Mark (Poetaster) Washeim

'On the linen wrappings of certain mummified remains
found near the Etrurian coast are invaluable writings
that await translation.

Quem colorem habet sapientia?'

Evan S. Connell

 



Mime
View raw message