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From "Kevin A. Burton" <bur...@relativity.yi.org>
Subject Re: [RT] "To Cocoon2 and beyond" :)
Date Mon, 28 Feb 2000 10:32:32 GMT
Stefano Mazzocchi wrote:
<snip> 
> 1) DirectoryProducer
<snip> 
> Don't you hate "http:/xml.apache.org/dist/" looks so out of place?
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a common look and feel throughout the entire
> web site? Well, this will do it.

Yes.  Hopefully one day Apache will just spit out XML in a Directory
Markup that the browser will then interpret to its own internal
representation.  Has anyone tried Mozilla with a local file system?  It
is pretty cool and uses DHTML to do it's browsing.

I am also impressed with how it handles non-html markup like RSS (ie
just like Jetspeed).
 
> 2) Enterprise taglibs for XSP
<snip>
> now, _THAT_ is something useful... not the SQL crap we have to embed
> into our logic. 

Simple.  Don't do it :).  Check out something like Castor that will take
an XML Schema and generate code for you to think of XML or a DB as an
object and not in *flat* SQL.  I think this is *big!

> Sure, if you already have relational data and you want
> something out of it, use donald's sql taglib and you'll be set for
> life... but like if you want to use your DBMS for store ACID
> transactions out of your pages... hmmmm, sql is expensive thing to do
> and, in my opinion, too different from the highly object-oriented Cocoon
> world.

Yes.  But it is very stable.  I personally like SQL but could see it
some day being replaced by XQL/XML.  In fact I headed up a project at my
last company to write an XQL/XML head on top of JDBC so that you can
just think of Oracle as an XML producer. :)
 
<snip>
> 5) RDF+RSS/CDF support.
> 
> Like for SOAP, the Cocoon architecture is XML-schema-neutral from the
> ground up so you can do whatever you want with all the schema you wants.
> But the RDF+RSS/CDF couple is _very_ interesting (see the JetSpeed
> project).

CDF is dead BTW/IMO.  OCS (http://www.internetalchemy.org) is the way to
go.  BTW Jetspeed has support for RSS (yes... both versions) and OCS. 
Currently I have about 550 (and possibly 3 times that) channels via one
OCS feed :)
 
> A breif explaination:
> 
> RDF stands for Resource Description Framework and it's a W3C
> Recommendation issued three days ago over more than 2 years of work!!!
> RDF is one of the oldest XML research projects and, let me tell you, one
> of the most brilliant.


+1 RDF rocks!


> RDF is not even a language, but a framework, a namespace that should be
> intermixed with your own namespaces (whatever you want, even XHTML) to
> specify some information _about_ the content.
> 
> things like "document abstract, key words, authors" and the like should
> be indicated with the proper elements, but some RDF meaning should be
> added to allow, say, indexers or crawlers to retrieve information about
> them.
> 
> RDF specifies "metadata", that is "data about data". Just like XML is a
> "meta-language", a "language for languages".
> 
> RSS is Netscape's "Rich Site Summary" and CDF is Microsoft's "Channel
> Description Format".
> 
> Both do the same thing: create sort of simple indexing about the site
> they refer to. For example, let's look at the Mozilla automatic RSS file
> (http://www.mozilla.org/news.rdf):
> 
> <?xml version="1.0"?>
> <rdf:RDF
>  xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
>  xmlns="http://my.netscape.com/rdf/simple/0.9/">
> <channel>
>  <title>Mozilla Dot Org</title>
>  <description>the mozilla.org website</description>
>  <link>http://www.mozilla.org</link>
> </channel>
> 
> <item>
>  <title>XPInstall Newsgroup</title>
>  <link>http://www.mozilla.org/news.html</link>
> </item>
> 
> <item>
>  <title>Open Source PKI Code Released</title>
> 
> <link>http://www.mozilla.org/projects/security/pki/src/download.html</link>
> </item>
> </rdf:RDF>

CDF is basically only a pointer to the original content.  It specifies
things like refresh rate, etc.  It is still just HTML 4.0 so is broken.

RSS is the way to go.
 
<snip>
>  b) generate the RSS info out of pages contained inside out of RDF
> metainformation.

That is interesting.  Once XHTML takes off this would be a great way for
obtaining... Metainfo (go figure  :) about HTML pages.  Mozilla could
take advantage of this by a Properties dialog box :).  YES!  
<snip>
-- 
Kevin A Burton
http://relativity.yi.org
Message to SUN:  "Open Source Java!"
"For evil to win is for good men to do nothing."

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