cocoon-dev mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From stef...@locus.apache.org
Subject cvs commit: xml-cocoon/docs installing.xml
Date Thu, 06 Jan 2000 15:15:01 GMT
stefano     00/01/06 07:15:01

  Modified:    docs     installing.xml
  Log:
  added some more installation instructions
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.13      +123 -12   xml-cocoon/docs/installing.xml
  
  Index: installing.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-cocoon/docs/installing.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.12
  retrieving revision 1.13
  diff -u -r1.12 -r1.13
  --- installing.xml	2000/01/03 01:34:34	1.12
  +++ installing.xml	2000/01/06 15:15:01	1.13
  @@ -62,7 +62,7 @@
       <tr>
        <td>Sun ProjectX</td>
        <td>TR2</td>
  -     <td><link href="http://java.sun.com/xml/">java.sun.com</link></td>
  +     <td><link href="http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/products/xml/">java.sun.com</link></td>
       </tr>
       <tr>
        <td colspan="3">Cocoon comes preconfigured for Xerces</td>
  @@ -161,6 +161,88 @@
      servlet systems.
     </p>
     
  +  <s2 title="General considerations">
  +   <p>
  +    There are some general considerations that apply to all systems.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p>
  +    Since there is no portable way, in a Java platform, to tell how much memory an object
  +    is using, the memory cache works in a rather cumbersome manner:  you set up
  +    a lower limit that the cache must always leave free for the JVM operation. 
  +    This means, that if the memory limit is 200Kb, Cocoon uses all your JVM
  +    heap size to store pages in memory and makes sure that 200Kb are available
  +    for other operations.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p>
  +    This does not impact the JVM operation, if enough memory is left for the
  +    normal operation. You must be aware of the fact that leaving Cocoon with
  +    too little memory for operation does impact peformance since the JVM
  +    garbage collector has to do more work to keep up with execution and 
  +    memory cleanup. Sometimes, you may even end up having OutOfMemoryExceptions
  +    if your limit is lower than the memory required for the operation.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p>
  +    A good way to control your memory is to setup your JVM with a fixed
  +    heap limit and to give it enough memory to start. This is done by using
  +    command line parameters for your java interpreter such as:
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <ul>
  +    <li>Startup heap size:
  +     <ul>
  +      <li>java 1.1 - <code>-ms[size]</code>
  +      <li>java 1.2 - <code>-Xms[size]</code>
  +     </ul>
  +    </li>
  +    <li>Maximum heap size:
  +     <ul>
  +      <li>java 1.1 - <code>-mx[size]</code>
  +      <li>java 1.2 - <code>-Xmx[size]</code>
  +     </ul>
  +    </li>
  +   </ul>
  +     
  +   <p>
  +    A well balanced system should have something like 8Mb start heap, 2Mb
  +    Cocoon memory limit and 64Mb or greater max heap, but these depend heavily
  +    on your system load/configuration to be generally meaningful.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p>
  +    To change the cocoon object store memory limit open you should change the
  +    following property in the <code>cocoon.properties</code> file.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +<source>store.memory = 200000</source>   
  +    
  +   <p>
  +    Another important part of Cocoon is the page compiler used inside the
  +    XSP processor which store the generated/compiled pages on file system. 
  +    The default directory is <code>./repository</code> which is usually relative
  +    to the web server or servlet engine working directory.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p>
  +    If you experience
  +    troubles (such as not having reading/writing permissions) or you want to 
  +    locate this directory somewhere else, you have to change the
  +   </p>
  +   
  +<source>processor.xsp.repository = ./repository</store>
  +
  +   <p>
  +    property in the cocoon configuration file.
  +   </p>
  +   
  +   <p><strong>Warning:</strong>
  +    Since this directory may contain security sensible information, make sure 
  +    you deny access (even read-only) to untrusted users.
  +   </p>
  +  </s2>
  +  
     <s2 title="Installing Cocoon on Apache JServ">
      <p>
       Apache JServ has one configuration file for the whole engine (normally called
  @@ -238,11 +320,20 @@
       and <em>/servlet/</em> is the mount point of your servlet zone (and the
       above is the standard name for servlet mapping for Apache JServ).
      </p>
  -   
  +
      <p>
  +    At this point, you should check if your system matches the global 
  +    considerations about Cocoon properties. Usually, you might want to give
  +    the installation a try as it is and then read again that section if
  +    something goes wrong. Most installations don't need any changes to
  +    be operational.
  +   </p>
  +       
  +   <p>
       Everything should be configured fine. Restart both Apache and Apache JServ
       and try accessing the samples contained in the distribution to see
  -    Cocoon in action.
  +    Cocoon in action or the <code>/Cocoon.xml</code> page for Cocoon internal
  +    status.
      </p>
      
      <p>
  @@ -331,12 +422,21 @@
        don't need to care about that at this point.
       </p>
   
  -    <p>
  -     Everything should be configured fine. Restart Tomcat
  -     and try accessing the samples contained in the distribution to see
  -     Cocoon in action.
  -    </p>
  -    
  +   <p>
  +    At this point, you should check if your system matches the global 
  +    considerations about Cocoon properties. Usually, you might want to give
  +    the installation a try as it is and then read again that section if
  +    something goes wrong. Most installations don't need any changes to
  +    be operational.
  +   </p>
  +
  +   <p>
  +    Everything should be configured fine. Restart both Apache and Tomcat
  +    and try accessing the samples contained in the distribution to see
  +    Cocoon in action or the <code>/Cocoon.xml</code> page for Cocoon internal
  +    status.
  +   </p>
  +       
       <note><strong>
        Tomcat 3.0 has a bug that prevents Cocoon operation. In order to make
        Cocoon work under Tomcat you need to download a newer version or, if 
  @@ -367,11 +467,22 @@
       making sure that you replaced <em>[path-to-cocoon]</em> with the actual
       path in your system.
      </p>
  +
  +   <p>
  +    At this point, you should check if your system matches the global 
  +    considerations about Cocoon properties. Usually, you might want to give
  +    the installation a try as it is and then read again that section if
  +    something goes wrong. Most installations don't need any changes to
  +    be operational.
  +   </p>
  +   
      <p>
  -    At this point your system is configured. Access the "/Cocoon.xml" page
  -    with your browser to see the Cocoon status screen that will tell you
  -    that Cocoon is up and running.
  +    Everything should be configured fine. Restart Weblogic
  +    and try accessing the samples contained in the distribution to see
  +    Cocoon in action or the <code>/Cocoon.xml</code> page for Cocoon internal
  +    status.
      </p>
  +      
     </s2>
     
     <s2 title="Installing Cocoon on other platforms">
  
  
  

Mime
View raw message