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From vgritse...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r159706 - in cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X: ./ src/documentation/xdocs/ src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/
Date Fri, 01 Apr 2005 16:39:20 GMT
Author: vgritsenko
Date: Fri Apr  1 08:39:19 2005
New Revision: 159706

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs?view=rev&rev=159706
Log:
fix bug #26107. rearrange left menu a bit.

Modified:
    cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/book.xml
    cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/introduction.xml
    cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/overview.xml
    cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/logicsheet.xml
    cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/status.xml

Modified: cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/book.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/book.xml?view=diff&r1=159705&r2=159706
==============================================================================
--- cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/book.xml (original)
+++ cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/book.xml Fri Apr  1 08:39:19 2005
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
 
   <menu label="About">
     <menu-item label="Index" href="index.html"/>
-    <menu-item label="Features" href="features.html"/>    
+    <menu-item label="Features" href="features.html"/>
     <external label="News" href="http://cocoon.apache.org/news/"/>
     <menu-item label="License" href="license.html"/>
     <external label="Download" href="http://cocoon.apache.org/mirror.cgi"/>
@@ -32,11 +32,11 @@
 
   <menu label="Documentation">
     <menu-item label="Introduction" href="introduction.html"/>
-    <menu-item label="Tracks" href="tracks/index.html"/>
-    <menu-item label="Installing" href="installing/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="Overview" href="overview.html"/>
+    <menu-item label="Installing" href="installing/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="User Guide" href="userdocs/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="Dev Guide" href="developing/index.html"/>
+    <menu-item label="Tracks" href="tracks/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="Tutorials" href="tutorial/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="FAQs" href="faq/index.html"/>
     <menu-item label="How-Tos" href="howto/index.html"/>

Modified: cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/introduction.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/introduction.xml?view=diff&r1=159705&r2=159706
==============================================================================
--- cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/introduction.xml (original)
+++ cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/introduction.xml Fri Apr  1 08:39:19
2005
@@ -17,9 +17,9 @@
 <!DOCTYPE document PUBLIC "-//APACHE//DTD Documentation V1.0//EN" "document-v10.dtd">
 
 <document>
-
   <header>
-    <title>Introducing Cocoon</title>
+    <title>Introducing Apache Cocoon</title>
+    <version>$Id$</version>
     <authors>
       <person name="Stefano Mazzocchi" email="stefano@apache.org"/>
     </authors>
@@ -240,7 +240,7 @@
 </p>
 
 <p>
-So, you could be wondering, why did we spend so much effort to 
+So, you could be wondering, why did we spend so much effort to
 write an XML publishing framework? This document was written exactly
 to clear your doubts on this, so let's keep going.
 </p>
@@ -300,7 +300,7 @@
 <p>
 This was the point where Stefano was more or less two years ago for
 java.apache.org: I could use XML and define my own semantics with
-<![CDATA[<sidebar>]]>, <![CDATA[<news>]]>, <![CDATA[<status>]]>

+<![CDATA[<sidebar>]]>, <![CDATA[<news>]]>, <![CDATA[<status>]]>
 and all that and I'm sure people would have
 found those XML documents much easier to write (since the XML syntax is
 very similar to the HTML one and very user friendly)... but I would have

Modified: cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/overview.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/overview.xml?view=diff&r1=159705&r2=159706
==============================================================================
--- cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/overview.xml (original)
+++ cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/overview.xml Fri Apr  1 08:39:19
2005
@@ -17,30 +17,31 @@
 <?xml-stylesheet type="text/css" href="css/document.css"?>
 <!DOCTYPE document PUBLIC "-//APACHE//DTD Documentation V1.0//EN" "document-v10.dtd">
 
-<document> 
-  <header> 
-	 <title>Overview of Apache Cocoon</title>
-	 <version>0.2</version> 
-	 <type>Overview document</type> 
-	 <authors><person name="Tom Klaasen" email="tom.klaasen@pandora.be"/> 
-	 </authors> 
-  </header> 
-  <body> 
-	 <s1 title="What is Apache Cocoon"> 
+<document>
+  <header>
+    <title>Overview of Apache Cocoon</title>
+    <version>$Id$</version> 
+    <type>Overview document</type>
+    <authors><person name="Tom Klaasen" email="tom.klaasen@pandora.be"/>
+    </authors>
+  </header>
+
+  <body>
+	 <s1 title="What is Apache Cocoon">
 		<p>Cocoon is an XML publishing framework. It allows you to define XML
 		  documents and transformations to be applied on it, to eventually generate a
-		  presentation format of your choice (HTML, PDF, SVG, ...).</p> 
+		  presentation format of your choice (HTML, PDF, SVG, ...).</p>
 		<p>Cocoon also gives you the possibility to apply logic to your XML files
-		  (so that the XML pipeline can be dynamic).</p> 
+		  (so that the XML pipeline can be dynamic).</p>
 
     <p>The <link href="userdocs/index.html">User documentation</link>
      and especially <link href="userdocs/concepts/index.html">Concepts</link>
      will help to understand Cocoon.
     </p>
-   </s1> 
+   </s1>
 
    <anchor id="samples"/>
-   <s1 title="Examples and demonstration applications"> 
+   <s1 title="Examples and demonstration applications">
     <p>
      There are a whole suite of sample applications to demonstrate the power
      of Cocoon. These samples are available from the "welcome" page after
@@ -63,49 +64,49 @@
      <code>src/webapp/samples/</code> and by consulting each sitemap to see
      the processing steps that are defined.
     </p>
-   </s1> 
+   </s1>
 
-   <s1 title="Overview of XML document processing"> 
+   <s1 title="Overview of XML document processing">
     <p>This section gives a general overview of how an XML document is
      handled by Cocoon. See also the document
      <link href="userdocs/concepts/index.html">Understanding Cocoon</link> for
explanation of
      the separation of content, style, logic and management functions.
-    </p> 
+    </p>
 
-		<s2 title="Pipeline"> 
+		<s2 title="Pipeline">
 		  <p>Cocoon relies on the pipeline model: an XML document is pushed
 			 through a pipeline, that exists in several transformation steps of your
 			 document. Every pipeline begins with a generator, continues with zero or more
 			 transformers, and ends with a serializer. This can be compared to the
 			 "servlet-chaining" concept of a servlet engine. We'll explain the components of
-			 the pipeline now in more detail.</p> 
-		  <s3 title="Generator"> 
+			 the pipeline now in more detail.</p>
+		  <s3 title="Generator">
 			 <p>The Generator is the starting point for the pipeline. It is
-				responsible for delivering SAX events down the pipeline.</p> 
+				responsible for delivering SAX events down the pipeline.</p>
 			 <p>The simplest Generator is the FileGenerator: it takes a local XML
-				document, parses it, and sends the SAX events down the pipeline. </p> 
+				document, parses it, and sends the SAX events down the pipeline. </p>
 			 <p>The Generator is constructed to be independent of the concept
 				"file". If you are able to generate SAX events from another source, you can use
-				that without having to go via a temporary file.</p> 
-		  </s3> 
-		  <s3 title="Transformer"> 
+				that without having to go via a temporary file.</p>
+		  </s3>
+		  <s3 title="Transformer">
 			 <p>A Transformer can be compared to an XSL: it gets an XML document
-				(or SAX events), and generates another XML document (or SAX events).</p> 
+				(or SAX events), and generates another XML document (or SAX events).</p>
 			 <p>The simplest Transformer is the XalanTransformer: it applies an
-				XSL to the SAX events it receives.</p> 
-		  </s3> 
-		  <s3 title="Serializer"> 
+				XSL to the SAX events it receives.</p>
+		  </s3>
+		  <s3 title="Serializer">
 			 <p>A Serializer is responsible for transforming SAX events to a
 				presentation format. For actors looking at the back of the pipeline, it looks
 				like a static file is delivered. So a browser can receive HTML, and will not be
 				able to tell the difference with a static file on the filesystem of the server.
-				</p> 
+				</p>
 			 <p>We have Serializers for generating HTML, XML, PDF, VRML, WAP, and
-				of course you can create your own.</p> 
+				of course you can create your own.</p>
 			 <p>The simplest Serializer is the XMLSerializer: it receives the SAX
-				events from up the pipeline, and returns a "human-readable" XML file.</p> 
-		  </s3> 
-		</s2> 
-	 </s1> 
+				events from up the pipeline, and returns a "human-readable" XML file.</p>
+		  </s3>
+		</s2>
+	 </s1>
   </body>
 </document>

Modified: cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/logicsheet.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/logicsheet.xml?view=diff&r1=159705&r2=159706
==============================================================================
--- cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/logicsheet.xml (original)
+++ cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/src/documentation/xdocs/userdocs/xsp/logicsheet.xml Fri Apr
 1 08:39:19 2005
@@ -17,27 +17,29 @@
 <!DOCTYPE document PUBLIC "-//APACHE//DTD Documentation V1.0//EN" "document-v10.dtd">
 
 <document>
- <header>
-  <title>XSP Logicsheet Guide</title>
-  <authors>
-   <person name="Christopher Painter-Wakefield" email="paint007@mc.duke.edu"/>
-  </authors>
- </header>
+  <header>
+    <title>XSP Logicsheet Guide</title>
+    <version>$Id$</version>
+    <authors>
+      <person name="Christopher Painter-Wakefield" email="paint007@mc.duke.edu"/>
+      <person name="Vadim Gritsenko" email="vgritsenko@apache.org"/>
+    </authors>
+  </header>
 
- <body>
+  <body>
 
 <s1 title="Introduction">
   <p>This document is intended as an introduction and brief tutorial to using and
   creating Apache Cocoon XSP logicsheets. It is assumed that the reader has a working
   knowledge of XML and XSLT, and has worked through at least the basic XSP examples
-  supplied with Cocoon.  Although this is not intended as a tutorial for XSP 
+  supplied with Cocoon.  Although this is not intended as a tutorial for XSP
   specifically, much of the material may be helpful in gaining a fuller understanding
   of XSP.</p>
 </s1>
 
-<s1 title="Taglibs and logicsheets">
+<s1 title="Taglibs and Logicsheets">
   <p>There is some confusion over the terms "taglib" and "logicsheet".  Many people
-  will use these terms interchangeably.  The term "taglib" comes from JSP, which 
+  will use these terms interchangeably.  The term "taglib" comes from JSP, which
   inspired XSP.  An XSP logicsheet is a "tag library" in the sense that it defines
   a set of custom XML tags which can be used within an XSP program to insert whole
   blocks of code into the file.  Cocoon comes with several pre-defined "taglibs",
@@ -59,7 +61,7 @@
   working (if trivial) example of XSP using a custom logicsheet.</p>
 
 <s2 title="Simple HTML Example">
-  <p>All of the examples in this section will produce HTML output 
+  <p>All of the examples in this section will produce HTML output
   essentially equivalent to this:</p>
 
 <source><![CDATA[
@@ -74,26 +76,20 @@
   <p>I did say these would be simple examples, didn't I?</p>
 
 <s2 title="Simple XML/XSL Example">
-  <p>Here's a simple XML file:</p>
-  
-<source>
-greeting.xml
-<![CDATA[
-<?xml version="1.0"?>
+  <p>Here's a simple greeting.xml file:</p>
 
+<source><![CDATA[
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
 <greeting>Hello, world!</greeting>
 ]]></source>
 
-  <p>...and here's the XSL stylesheet that will transform it into an HTML file
+  <p>...and here's the greeting.xsl stylesheet that will transform it into an HTML
file
   similar to the one we started this section with:</p>
 
-
-<source>
-greeting.xsl
-<![CDATA[
+<source><![CDATA[
 <?xml version="1.0"?>
-<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
-
+<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
+                xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:template match="/">
   <html>
     <body>
@@ -103,11 +99,10 @@
     </body>
   </html>
 </xsl:template>
-
 </xsl:stylesheet>
 ]]></source>
 
-  <p>So far, nothing exciting.  The input XML has a single element, &lt;greeting>,
+  <p>So far, nothing exciting.  The input XML has a single element, &lt;greeting&gt;,
   whose text contents gets spit out in HTML.  The contents of our particular XML
   file's greeting is, predictably, "Hello, World!"  The point of showing you this
   is that, as we elaborate our example by adding Java code through XSP, and later
@@ -119,13 +114,11 @@
 <s2 title="Simple XSP Example">
   <p>Next, we continue in our trivial vein by using trivial Java code to make an
   XSP program, whose output will mimic that of our XML file above.  The output
-  of this file is transformed to HTML by the same XSL stylesheet as above:</p>
+  of this file, greeting2.xml, is transformed to HTML by the same XSL stylesheet
+  as above:</p>
 
-<source>
-greeting2.xml
-<![CDATA[
+<source><![CDATA[
 <?xml version="1.0"?>
-
 <xsp:page xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp">
 
   <xsp:logic>
@@ -144,35 +137,31 @@
 <s2 title="Simple XSP Logicsheet Example">
 
   <p>Now we are ready to present our final trivial example, using a custom
-  logicsheet.  There are two files shown below.  The first is an XSP file
-  that uses a custom logicsheet, logicsheet.greeting.xsl, which is the second
-  file shown below.</p>
-  
-<source>
-greeting3.xml
-<![CDATA[
-<?xml version="1.0"?>
+  logicsheet.  There are two files shown below.  The first is an XSP file,
+  greeting3.xml.</p>
 
-<xsp:page
-  xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
-  xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting">
+<source><![CDATA[
+<?xml version="1.0"?>
+<?xml-logicsheet href="logicsheet.greeting.xsl"?>
 
+<xsp:page xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
+          xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting">
   <greeting>
     <greeting:hello-world/>
   </greeting>
-
 </xsp:page>
 ]]></source>
 
-<source>
-logicsheet.greeting.xsl
-<![CDATA[
+  <p>It uses a custom logicsheet, logicsheet.greeting.xsl, which is the file
+  shown below.</p>
+
+<source><![CDATA[
 <?xml version="1.0"?>
-<xsl:stylesheet
-  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
-  xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
-  xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting"
-  version="1.0">
+
+<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
+                xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
+                xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
+                xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting">
 
 <xsl:template match="xsp:page">
  <xsl:copy>
@@ -203,17 +192,22 @@
 
   <p>There are several things to note about these two files.  First, note
   that we inform the XSP processor that it should apply our custom logicsheet
-  using the processing instruction</p>
+  using the processing instruction:</p>
   <source><![CDATA[<?xml-logicsheet href="logicsheet.greeting.xsl"?>]]></source>
 
   <p>There are other ways to associate a logicsheet with an XSP file, which we'll
-  discuss later.  Next, note that our logicsheet defines a new namespace, 
+  discuss later.  Next, note that our logicsheet defines a new namespace,
   <strong>greeting:</strong>, which must be declared in both files using the
same URI:</p>
   <source><![CDATA[xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting"]]></source>
 
-  <p>Note that the URI is completely arbitrary.  I've chosen to construct my
-  namespace URI's by using my institution's web address (http://duke.edu/)
-  followed by the project name (tutorial) and namespace name (greeting).  
+  <note>
+    Namespaces of all used logicsheets <strong>must</strong> be declared on the
+    root element, <code>xsp:page</code>.
+  </note>
+
+  <p>Note that the logicsheet URI is completely arbitrary.  I've chosen to construct
+  my namespace URI's by using my institution's web address (http://duke.edu/)
+  followed by the project name (tutorial) and namespace name (greeting).
   You may use any scheme you wish for your namespace URI's; however, the URI
   declared in the logicsheet <strong>must</strong> match the URI declared in
the
   XSP which uses the logicsheet.</p>
@@ -223,16 +217,14 @@
   not just to any XML file, but specifically to an XSP file, and the end result of
   its transformation is another XSP file.  If you were to apply the logicsheet in
   this example to the XML file in this example as just a stylesheet (with no XSP
-  processing), you would end up with something like the following (compare to our 
+  processing), you would end up with something like the following (compare to our
   earlier XSP example):</p>
 
 <source><![CDATA[
 <?xml version="1.0"?>
 
-<xsp:page 
-  xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting" 
-  xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp">
-
+<xsp:page xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
+          xmlns:greeting="http://duke.edu/tutorial/greeting">
   <greeting>
     <xsp:logic>
       // this could be arbitrarily complex Java code, JDBC queries, etc.
@@ -253,14 +245,14 @@
   right after xml header and before &lt;xsp:page&gt; tag:</p>
 <source><![CDATA[
 <?xml version="1.0"?>
-
-<?xml-logicsheet href="logicsheet.greeting.xsl"?>]]>
-</source>
+<?xml-logicsheet href="logicsheet.greeting.xsl"?>
+]]></source>
 
   <p>There is another way to apply a logicsheet, which doesn't require a
   processing instruction for each file that uses the logicsheet.  The
   second way is to declare logicsheet in the cocoon.xconf file.
   These declarations take the form</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 <builtin-logicsheet>
   <parameter name="prefix" value="&lt;logicsheet's prefix&gt;"/>
@@ -271,6 +263,7 @@
 
   <p>Cocoon's pre-defined logicsheets are already declared in this file.  For
   instance, the declaration of the XSP request taglib is the following:</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 <builtin-logicsheet>
   <parameter name="prefix" value="xsp-request"/>
@@ -280,29 +273,29 @@
 </builtin-logicsheet>
 ]]></source>
 
-  <p>This line associates the <strong>http://apache.org/xsp/request/2.0</strong>

-  namespace with the logicsheet named in the URL. This URL points to a file 
-  that is stored in the cocoon.jar. To use the request taglib, you must 
+  <p>This line associates the <strong>http://apache.org/xsp/request/2.0</strong>
+  namespace with the logicsheet named in the URL. This URL points to a file
+  that is stored in the cocoon.jar. To use the request taglib, you must
   declare the request namespace in your XSP file:</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 ...
-<xsp:page
-  xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
-  xmlns:xsp-request="http://apache.org/xsp/request/2.0"
->
+<xsp:page xmlns:xsp="http://apache.org/xsp"
+          xmlns:xsp-request="http://apache.org/xsp/request/2.0">
 ...
 ]]></source>
 
-  <note>You should <strong>not</strong> try to apply the xsp-request 
+  <note>You should <strong>not</strong> try to apply the xsp-request
   taglib using the &lt;?xml-logicsheet?&gt; processing instruction,
   as this will result in the logicsheet being applied twice.</note>
 
   <p>You can add your own logicsheets to the cocoon.xconf file using the same
-  syntax. The only trick is constructing an appropriate URL. If we wanted to 
-  declare our <strong>greeting:</strong> namespace and logicsheet from the 
-  Hello, World! example above, and if the logicsheet were stored (on a UNIX 
-  filesystem) in the location /cocoon/logicsheets/logicsheet.greeting.xsl, 
+  syntax. The only trick is constructing an appropriate URL. If we wanted to
+  declare our <strong>greeting:</strong> namespace and logicsheet from the
+  Hello, World! example above, and if the logicsheet were stored (on a UNIX
+  filesystem) in the location /cocoon/logicsheets/logicsheet.greeting.xsl,
   we'd add this line to cocoon.xconf:</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 <builtin-logicsheet>
   <parameter name="prefix" value="greeting"/>
@@ -312,12 +305,18 @@
 </builtin-logicsheet>
 ]]></source>
 
-  <p>There are some very important differences between using the &lt;?xml-logicsheet?>

-  processing instruction vs. the cocoon.properties entry to apply a logicsheet.
-  Using cocoon.properties, any time the logicsheet changes, it is necessary to 
-  restart Cocoon.  If you instead use the processing instruction, Cocoon will detect
-  modifications to your logicsheet, and recompile your XSP programs accordingly.
-  Also, if you need to explicitly control the order in which your logicsheets are
+  <p>In addition to using 'file:' protocol, logicsheet URL can use 'resource:'
+  protocol to load logicsheets from the class loader, or 'context:' protocol to
+  specify URL relative to the web application context directory.</p>
+
+  <p>There are some very important differences between using the 'resource:'
+  protocol vs. the 'file:' protocol to apply a logicsheet.  Using 'resource:',
+  any time the logicsheet changes, it is necessary to restart Cocoon.  If you
+  instead use the 'file:' (or 'context:', and you are not deploying Cocoon as a
+  single war file), Cocoon will detect modifications to your logicsheet, and
+  recompile your XSP programs accordingly.</p>
+
+  <p>If you happen to need to explicitly control the order in which your logicsheets
are
   applied, you need to use the processing instruction.  Logicsheets will be applied
   in the order in which they appear in processing instructions in your source file.</p>
 
@@ -329,14 +328,14 @@
 <s1 title="Logicsheet Development Tips">
   <s2 title="Development Practices">
   <p>Developing Logicsheets can be a frustrating mental exercise, as it requires you
-  to understand and keep in mind the complex coordination of several different 
+  to understand and keep in mind the complex coordination of several different
   technologies: XML, XSLT, XSP, and Java.  A bad assumption in any of these areas
   can lead to an hour of debugging.  Following a few simple practices can reduce the
   frustration and make logicsheet programming less difficult:</p>
   <dl>
     <dt>Small Increments</dt>
     <dd>As with any software development, it is much easier to debug a small amount
-    of code than a large amount of code.  XSP is no different, except that the 
+    of code than a large amount of code.  XSP is no different, except that the
     complexity of a large amount of code is multiplied by the number of different
     technologies.  So, write a tiny bit of code and get it working, or start with a
     simple piece of code that is already working.  Make small changes, and get each
@@ -361,11 +360,11 @@
     tree) and borrow from it liberally.  Reading this code is also a good way to
     gain insight into logicsheet design.</dd>
   </dl>
-  </s2> 
+  </s2>
 
   <s2 title="Standard Templates">
     <p>As we discussed earlier, a logicsheet is just an XSLT stylesheet which transforms
-    one XSP source file into another.  Since we are always expecting to act on an XSP 
+    one XSP source file into another.  Since we are always expecting to act on an XSP
     source file, and there is the possibility that other logicsheets may also be acting
     on the same file (either before or after our logicsheet), there are a few templates
     which are more or less required in any logicsheet.  The templates below were all
@@ -385,6 +384,7 @@
     variables at the class level, you will need to have a way to add elements to the
     &lt;xsp:page> element that is at the root of the source file.  Here is a template
     to let you do that (from esql.xsl):</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 <xsl:template match="xsp:page">
   <xsp:page>
@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@
   </xsp:page>
 </xsl:template>
 ]]></source>
- 
+
     <p>Frequently, you may also need to declare variables or perform initialization
     that needs to occur before any of the code in your custom tags.  You could, of
     course, require that the users of your logicsheet use one particular tag before
@@ -412,6 +412,7 @@
     which don't themselves begin with 'xsp:'".  Since the &lt;xsp:page> element always
     has a single element which isn't in the xsp: namespace, this will be matched once
     and only once.</p>
+
 <source><![CDATA[
 <xsl:template match="xsp:page/*[not(starts-with(name(.), 'xsp:'))]">
  <xsl:copy>
@@ -421,7 +422,7 @@
   </xsp:logic>
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </xsl:copy>
-</xsl:template> 
+</xsl:template>
 ]]></source>
 
   </s2>
@@ -436,7 +437,6 @@
     even if it doesn't directly reference any of the tags in the second logicsheet.</p>
   </s2>
 </s1>
-
 
 </body>
 

Modified: cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/status.xml
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewcvs/cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/status.xml?view=diff&r1=159705&r2=159706
==============================================================================
--- cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/status.xml (original)
+++ cocoon/branches/BRANCH_2_1_X/status.xml Fri Apr  1 08:39:19 2005
@@ -202,6 +202,10 @@
 
   <changes>
   <release version="@version@" date="@date@">
+    <action dev="VG" type="fix" fixes-bug="26107">
+      XSP Block: Note in the documentation that XSP namespace must be declared
+      on the <code>xsp:page</code> element.
+    </action>
     <action dev="CZ" type="fix" fixes-bug="33963" due-to="John Yonosh" due-to-email="jyonosh@fcg.com">
       Fix NPE in DOMStreamer.stream().
     </action>



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