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From blorit...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: xml-cocoon/xdocs datasources.xml
Date Fri, 12 Jan 2001 20:20:55 GMT
bloritsch    01/01/12 12:20:55

  Modified:    xdocs    Tag: xml-cocoon2 datasources.xml
  Log:
  Added wording on how you actually get the Connection object.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  No                   revision
  
  
  No                   revision
  
  
  1.1.2.2   +48 -0     xml-cocoon/xdocs/Attic/datasources.xml
  
  Index: datasources.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-cocoon/xdocs/Attic/datasources.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.1.2.1
  retrieving revision 1.1.2.2
  diff -u -r1.1.2.1 -r1.1.2.2
  --- datasources.xml	2001/01/12 15:22:52	1.1.2.1
  +++ datasources.xml	2001/01/12 20:20:54	1.1.2.2
  @@ -120,6 +120,54 @@
         </p>
        </s3>
       </s2>
  +    <s2 title="Using the Data Source Component">
  +      <p>
  +       No matter how you defined your DataSourceComponent, you access
  +       it the same way.  Because The DataSourceComponent is a Component,
  +       your class needs to implement the Avalon Composer interface.  The
  +       Avalon Framework will give your class a ComponentManager.  At that
  +       point, it is up to you how and when you pull the DataSourceComponent
  +       out of the ComponentManager.
  +      </p>
  +      <source>
  +       <![CDATA[
  +import org.apache.avalon.ComponentManager;
  +import org.apache.avalon.ComponentSelector;
  +import org.apache.cocoon.Roles;
  +import org.apache.cocoon.component.datasource.DataSourceComponent;
  +
  +import java.sql.Connection;
  +
  +// .... Skip a lot of lines until we are in the method you use
  +//      to initialize the DataSourceComponent ....
  +
  +private DataSourceComponent datasource;
  +
  +public void compose(ComponentManager manager) {
  +    ComponentSelector selector = (ComponentSelector) manager.lookup(Roles.DB_CONNECTION);
  +    this.datasource = (DataSourceComponent) selector.select("MyConnectionName");
  +}
  +
  +// .... Skip more lines until we actually need to use the datasource
  +
  +private void meMethod() {
  +    Connection myConnection = this.datasource.getConnection();
  +
  +    // .... perform SQL code here
  +
  +    myConnection.close();
  +}
  +       ]]>
  +      </source>
  +      <p>
  +       Notice that once you obtained your connection, you did nothing out of the
  +       ordinary to return the connection to the pool?  This is by design, and a
  +       result of the JDBC specification.  Basically the JDBC specification states
  +       that if a driver implements pooled connections, then it should not alter
  +       the way those connections are used.  This maintains the portability of
  +       your code.
  +      </p>
  +    </s2>
      </s1> 
     </body>
   </document>
  
  
  

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