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From j..@apache.org
Subject git commit: updated refs/heads/4.1 to 4bf22b1
Date Fri, 19 Apr 2013 22:41:40 GMT
Updated Branches:
  refs/heads/4.1 ab2052506 -> 4bf22b1a0


CLOUDSTACK-382: Clarifying storage type in documentation as secondary storage.


Project: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/repo
Commit: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/commit/4bf22b1a
Tree: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/tree/4bf22b1a
Diff: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/diff/4bf22b1a

Branch: refs/heads/4.1
Commit: 4bf22b1a0a532e38743ac6cb63869d9414de270c
Parents: ab20525
Author: Joe Brockmeier <jzb@zonker.net>
Authored: Fri Apr 19 17:41:23 2013 -0500
Committer: Joe Brockmeier <jzb@zonker.net>
Committed: Fri Apr 19 17:41:23 2013 -0500

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml |    2 +-
 docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml    |    4 ++--
 2 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------


http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/blob/4bf22b1a/docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml b/docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
index d803592..4d1f465 100644
--- a/docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
+++ b/docs/en-US/advanced-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
         <listitem><para>Guest. When end users run VMs, they generate guest traffic.
The guest VMs communicate with each other over a network that can be referred to as the guest
network. This network can be isolated or shared. In an isolated guest network, the administrator
needs to reserve VLAN ranges to provide isolation for each &PRODUCT; account’s network
(potentially a large number of VLANs). In a shared guest network, all guest VMs share a single
network.</para></listitem>
         <listitem><para>Management. When &PRODUCT;’s internal resources
communicate with each other, they generate management traffic. This includes communication
between hosts, system VMs (VMs used by &PRODUCT; to perform various tasks in the cloud),
and any other component that communicates directly with the &PRODUCT; Management Server.
You must configure the IP range for the system VMs to use.</para></listitem>
         <listitem><para>Public. Public traffic is generated when VMs in the cloud
access the Internet. Publicly accessible IPs must be allocated for this purpose. End users
can use the &PRODUCT; UI to acquire these IPs to implement NAT between their guest network
and the public network, as described in “Acquiring a New IP Address” in the Administration
Guide.</para></listitem>
-        <listitem><para>Storage. Traffic such as VM templates and snapshots,
which is sent between the secondary storage VM and secondary storage servers. &PRODUCT;
uses a separate Network Interface Controller (NIC) named storage NIC for storage network traffic.
Use of a storage NIC that always operates on a high bandwidth network allows fast template
and snapshot copying. You must configure the IP range to use for the storage network.</para></listitem>
+        <listitem><para>Storage. While labeled "storage" this is specifically
about secondary storage, and doesn't affect traffic for primary storage. This includes traffic
such as VM templates and snapshots, which is sent between the secondary storage VM and secondary
storage servers. &PRODUCT; uses a separate Network Interface Controller (NIC) named storage
NIC for storage network traffic. Use of a storage NIC that always operates on a high bandwidth
network allows fast template and snapshot copying. You must configure the IP range to use
for the storage network.</para></listitem>
     </itemizedlist>
     <para>These traffic types can each be on a separate physical network, or they can
be combined with certain restrictions. When you use the Add Zone wizard in the UI to create
a new zone, you are guided into making only valid choices.</para>
 </section>

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/cloudstack/blob/4bf22b1a/docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml b/docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
index 70789d0..8503736 100644
--- a/docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
+++ b/docs/en-US/basic-zone-network-traffic-types.xml
@@ -26,10 +26,10 @@
     <para>When basic networking is used, there can be only one physical network in
the zone. That physical network carries the following traffic types:</para>
     <itemizedlist>
         <listitem><para>Guest. When end users run VMs, they generate guest traffic.
The guest VMs communicate with each other over a network that can be referred to as the guest
network. Each pod in a basic zone is a broadcast domain, and therefore each pod has a different
IP range for the guest network. The administrator must configure the IP range for each pod.</para></listitem>
-        <listitem><para>Management. When &PRODUCT;’s internal resources
communicate with each other, they generate management traffic. This includes communication
between hosts, system VMs (VMs used by &PRODUCT; to perform various tasks in the cloud),
and any other component that communicates directly with the &PRODUCT; Management Server.
You must configure the IP range for the system VMs to use.</para>
+        <listitem><para>Management. When &PRODUCT;'s internal resources communicate
with each other, they generate management traffic. This includes communication between hosts,
system VMs (VMs used by &PRODUCT; to perform various tasks in the cloud), and any other
component that communicates directly with the &PRODUCT; Management Server. You must configure
the IP range for the system VMs to use.</para>
             <note><para>We strongly recommend the use of separate NICs for management
traffic and guest traffic.</para></note></listitem>
         <listitem><para>Public. Public traffic is generated when VMs in the cloud
access the Internet. Publicly accessible IPs must be allocated for this purpose. End users
can use the &PRODUCT; UI to acquire these IPs to implement NAT between their guest network
and the public network, as described in Acquiring a New IP Address.</para></listitem>
-        <listitem><para>Storage. Traffic such as VM templates and snapshots,
which is sent between the secondary storage VM and secondary storage servers. &PRODUCT;
uses a separate Network Interface Controller (NIC) named storage NIC for storage network traffic.
Use of a storage NIC that always operates on a high bandwidth network allows fast template
and snapshot copying. You must configure the IP range to use for the storage network.</para></listitem>
+        <listitem><para>Storage. While labeled "storage" this is specifically
about secondary storage, and doesn't affect traffic for primary storage. This includes traffic
such as VM templates and snapshots, which is sent between the secondary storage VM and secondary
storage servers. &PRODUCT; uses a separate Network Interface Controller (NIC) named storage
NIC for storage network traffic. Use of a storage NIC that always operates on a high bandwidth
network allows fast template and snapshot copying. You must configure the IP range to use
for the storage network.</para></listitem>
     </itemizedlist>
     <para>In a basic network, configuring the physical network is fairly straightforward.
In most cases, you only need to configure one guest network to carry traffic that is generated
by guest VMs. If you use a NetScaler load balancer and enable its elastic IP and elastic load
balancing (EIP and ELB) features, you must also configure a network to carry public traffic.
&PRODUCT; takes care of presenting the necessary network configuration steps to you in
the UI when you add a new zone.</para>
 </section>


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