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From ey...@apache.org
Subject [16/22] chukwa git commit: CHUKWA-763. Removed unused old libraries. (Eric Yang)
Date Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:48:47 GMT
CHUKWA-763. Removed unused old libraries. (Eric Yang)


Project: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/repo
Commit: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/commit/01a72e24
Tree: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/tree/01a72e24
Diff: http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/diff/01a72e24

Branch: refs/heads/master
Commit: 01a72e24b816f93f9a9c97312c4f4b62664a1c68
Parents: 2e7c6fe
Author: Eric Yang <eyang@apache.org>
Authored: Mon Jun 22 13:36:16 2015 -0700
Committer: Eric Yang <eyang@apache.org>
Committed: Mon Jun 22 13:36:16 2015 -0700

----------------------------------------------------------------------
 CHANGES.txt                      |   2 +
 lib/commons-cli-2.0-SNAPSHOT.jar | Bin 258337 -> 0 bytes
 lib/jchronic-0.2.3.jar           | Bin 104581 -> 0 bytes
 lib/json-README.txt              | 563 ----------------------------------
 lib/json-lib-2.2.3-jdk15.jar     | Bin 148490 -> 0 bytes
 lib/json.jar                     | Bin 34638 -> 0 bytes
 6 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 563 deletions(-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------


http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/CHANGES.txt
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/CHANGES.txt b/CHANGES.txt
index e184e24..3fb27b2 100644
--- a/CHANGES.txt
+++ b/CHANGES.txt
@@ -44,6 +44,8 @@ Trunk (unreleased changes)
 
   BUGS
 
+    CHUKWA-763. Removed unused old libraries. (Eric Yang)
+
     CHUKWA-760. Added error message for missing configuration.  (Eric Yang)
 
     CHUKWA-762. Fixed stale test cases.  (Eric Yang)

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/lib/commons-cli-2.0-SNAPSHOT.jar
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/lib/commons-cli-2.0-SNAPSHOT.jar b/lib/commons-cli-2.0-SNAPSHOT.jar
deleted file mode 100644
index 0b1d510..0000000
Binary files a/lib/commons-cli-2.0-SNAPSHOT.jar and /dev/null differ

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/lib/jchronic-0.2.3.jar
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/lib/jchronic-0.2.3.jar b/lib/jchronic-0.2.3.jar
deleted file mode 100644
index c0f15a3..0000000
Binary files a/lib/jchronic-0.2.3.jar and /dev/null differ

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/lib/json-README.txt
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/lib/json-README.txt b/lib/json-README.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 67b8909..0000000
--- a/lib/json-README.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,563 +0,0 @@
-
-
-
-
-
-
-Network Working Group                                       D. Crockford
-Request for Comments: 4627                                      JSON.org
-Category: Informational                                        July 2006
-
-
- The application/json Media Type for JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
-
-Status of This Memo
-
-   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
-   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
-   memo is unlimited.
-
-Copyright Notice
-
-   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006).
-
-Abstract
-
-   JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a lightweight, text-based,
-   language-independent data interchange format.  It was derived from
-   the ECMAScript Programming Language Standard.  JSON defines a small
-   set of formatting rules for the portable representation of structured
-   data.
-
-1.  Introduction
-
-   JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a text format for the
-   serialization of structured data.  It is derived from the object
-   literals of JavaScript, as defined in the ECMAScript Programming
-   Language Standard, Third Edition [ECMA].
-
-   JSON can represent four primitive types (strings, numbers, booleans,
-   and null) and two structured types (objects and arrays).
-
-   A string is a sequence of zero or more Unicode characters [UNICODE].
-
-   An object is an unordered collection of zero or more name/value
-   pairs, where a name is a string and a value is a string, number,
-   boolean, null, object, or array.
-
-   An array is an ordered sequence of zero or more values.
-
-   The terms "object" and "array" come from the conventions of
-   JavaScript.
-
-   JSON's design goals were for it to be minimal, portable, textual, and
-   a subset of JavaScript.
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 1]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-1.1.  Conventions Used in This Document
-
-   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
-   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
-   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].
-
-   The grammatical rules in this document are to be interpreted as
-   described in [RFC4234].
-
-2.  JSON Grammar
-
-   A JSON text is a sequence of tokens.  The set of tokens includes six
-   structural characters, strings, numbers, and three literal names.
-
-   A JSON text is a serialized object or array.
-
-      JSON-text = object / array
-
-   These are the six structural characters:
-
-      begin-array     = ws %x5B ws  ; [ left square bracket
-
-      begin-object    = ws %x7B ws  ; { left curly bracket
-
-      end-array       = ws %x5D ws  ; ] right square bracket
-
-      end-object      = ws %x7D ws  ; } right curly bracket
-
-      name-separator  = ws %x3A ws  ; : colon
-
-      value-separator = ws %x2C ws  ; , comma
-
-   Insignificant whitespace is allowed before or after any of the six
-   structural characters.
-
-      ws = *(
-                %x20 /              ; Space
-                %x09 /              ; Horizontal tab
-                %x0A /              ; Line feed or New line
-                %x0D                ; Carriage return
-            )
-
-2.1.  Values
-
-   A JSON value MUST be an object, array, number, or string, or one of
-   the following three literal names:
-
-      false null true
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 2]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-   The literal names MUST be lowercase.  No other literal names are
-   allowed.
-
-         value = false / null / true / object / array / number / string
-
-         false = %x66.61.6c.73.65   ; false
-
-         null  = %x6e.75.6c.6c      ; null
-
-         true  = %x74.72.75.65      ; true
-
-2.2.  Objects
-
-   An object structure is represented as a pair of curly brackets
-   surrounding zero or more name/value pairs (or members).  A name is a
-   string.  A single colon comes after each name, separating the name
-   from the value.  A single comma separates a value from a following
-   name.  The names within an object SHOULD be unique.
-
-      object = begin-object [ member *( value-separator member ) ]
-      end-object
-
-      member = string name-separator value
-
-2.3.  Arrays
-
-   An array structure is represented as square brackets surrounding zero
-   or more values (or elements).  Elements are separated by commas.
-
-      array = begin-array [ value *( value-separator value ) ] end-array
-
-2.4.  Numbers
-
-   The representation of numbers is similar to that used in most
-   programming languages.  A number contains an integer component that
-   may be prefixed with an optional minus sign, which may be followed by
-   a fraction part and/or an exponent part.
-
-   Octal and hex forms are not allowed.  Leading zeros are not allowed.
-
-   A fraction part is a decimal point followed by one or more digits.
-
-   An exponent part begins with the letter E in upper or lowercase,
-   which may be followed by a plus or minus sign.  The E and optional
-   sign are followed by one or more digits.
-
-   Numeric values that cannot be represented as sequences of digits
-   (such as Infinity and NaN) are not permitted.
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 3]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-         number = [ minus ] int [ frac ] [ exp ]
-
-         decimal-point = %x2E       ; .
-
-         digit1-9 = %x31-39         ; 1-9
-
-         e = %x65 / %x45            ; e E
-
-         exp = e [ minus / plus ] 1*DIGIT
-
-         frac = decimal-point 1*DIGIT
-
-         int = zero / ( digit1-9 *DIGIT )
-
-         minus = %x2D               ; -
-
-         plus = %x2B                ; +
-
-         zero = %x30                ; 0
-
-2.5.  Strings
-
-   The representation of strings is similar to conventions used in the C
-   family of programming languages.  A string begins and ends with
-   quotation marks.  All Unicode characters may be placed within the
-   quotation marks except for the characters that must be escaped:
-   quotation mark, reverse solidus, and the control characters (U+0000
-   through U+001F).
-
-   Any character may be escaped.  If the character is in the Basic
-   Multilingual Plane (U+0000 through U+FFFF), then it may be
-   represented as a six-character sequence: a reverse solidus, followed
-   by the lowercase letter u, followed by four hexadecimal digits that
-   encode the character's code point.  The hexadecimal letters A though
-   F can be upper or lowercase.  So, for example, a string containing
-   only a single reverse solidus character may be represented as
-   "\u005C".
-
-   Alternatively, there are two-character sequence escape
-   representations of some popular characters.  So, for example, a
-   string containing only a single reverse solidus character may be
-   represented more compactly as "\\".
-
-   To escape an extended character that is not in the Basic Multilingual
-   Plane, the character is represented as a twelve-character sequence,
-   encoding the UTF-16 surrogate pair.  So, for example, a string
-   containing only the G clef character (U+1D11E) may be represented as
-   "\uD834\uDD1E".
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 4]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-         string = quotation-mark *char quotation-mark
-
-         char = unescaped /
-                escape (
-                    %x22 /          ; "    quotation mark  U+0022
-                    %x5C /          ; \    reverse solidus U+005C
-                    %x2F /          ; /    solidus         U+002F
-                    %x62 /          ; b    backspace       U+0008
-                    %x66 /          ; f    form feed       U+000C
-                    %x6E /          ; n    line feed       U+000A
-                    %x72 /          ; r    carriage return U+000D
-                    %x74 /          ; t    tab             U+0009
-                    %x75 4HEXDIG )  ; uXXXX                U+XXXX
-
-         escape = %x5C              ; \
-
-         quotation-mark = %x22      ; "
-
-         unescaped = %x20-21 / %x23-5B / %x5D-10FFFF
-
-3.  Encoding
-
-   JSON text SHALL be encoded in Unicode.  The default encoding is
-   UTF-8.
-
-   Since the first two characters of a JSON text will always be ASCII
-   characters [RFC0020], it is possible to determine whether an octet
-   stream is UTF-8, UTF-16 (BE or LE), or UTF-32 (BE or LE) by looking
-   at the pattern of nulls in the first four octets.
-
-           00 00 00 xx  UTF-32BE
-           00 xx 00 xx  UTF-16BE
-           xx 00 00 00  UTF-32LE
-           xx 00 xx 00  UTF-16LE
-           xx xx xx xx  UTF-8
-
-4.  Parsers
-
-   A JSON parser transforms a JSON text into another representation.  A
-   JSON parser MUST accept all texts that conform to the JSON grammar.
-   A JSON parser MAY accept non-JSON forms or extensions.
-
-   An implementation may set limits on the size of texts that it
-   accepts.  An implementation may set limits on the maximum depth of
-   nesting.  An implementation may set limits on the range of numbers.
-   An implementation may set limits on the length and character contents
-   of strings.
-
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 5]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-5. Generators
-
-   A JSON generator produces JSON text.  The resulting text MUST
-   strictly conform to the JSON grammar.
-
-6. IANA Considerations
-
-   The MIME media type for JSON text is application/json.
-
-   Type name: application
-
-   Subtype name: json
-
-   Required parameters: n/a
-
-   Optional parameters: n/a
-
-   Encoding considerations: 8bit if UTF-8; binary if UTF-16 or UTF-32
-
-      JSON may be represented using UTF-8, UTF-16, or UTF-32.  When JSON
-      is written in UTF-8, JSON is 8bit compatible.  When JSON is
-      written in UTF-16 or UTF-32, the binary content-transfer-encoding
-      must be used.
-
-   Security considerations:
-
-   Generally there are security issues with scripting languages.  JSON
-   is a subset of JavaScript, but it is a safe subset that excludes
-   assignment and invocation.
-
-   A JSON text can be safely passed into JavaScript's eval() function
-   (which compiles and executes a string) if all the characters not
-   enclosed in strings are in the set of characters that form JSON
-   tokens.  This can be quickly determined in JavaScript with two
-   regular expressions and calls to the test and replace methods.
-
-      var my_JSON_object = !(/[^,:{}\[\]0-9.\-+Eaeflnr-u \n\r\t]/.test(
-             text.replace(/"(\\.|[^"\\])*"/g, ''))) &&
-         eval('(' + text + ')');
-
-   Interoperability considerations: n/a
-
-   Published specification: RFC 4627
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 6]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-   Applications that use this media type:
-
-      JSON has been used to exchange data between applications written
-      in all of these programming languages: ActionScript, C, C#,
-      ColdFusion, Common Lisp, E, Erlang, Java, JavaScript, Lua,
-      Objective CAML, Perl, PHP, Python, Rebol, Ruby, and Scheme.
-
-   Additional information:
-
-      Magic number(s): n/a
-      File extension(s): .json
-      Macintosh file type code(s): TEXT
-
-   Person & email address to contact for further information:
-      Douglas Crockford
-      douglas@crockford.com
-
-   Intended usage: COMMON
-
-   Restrictions on usage: none
-
-   Author:
-      Douglas Crockford
-      douglas@crockford.com
-
-   Change controller:
-      Douglas Crockford
-      douglas@crockford.com
-
-7. Security Considerations
-
-   See Security Considerations in Section 6.
-
-8. Examples
-
-   This is a JSON object:
-
-   {
-      "Image": {
-          "Width":  800,
-          "Height": 600,
-          "Title":  "View from 15th Floor",
-          "Thumbnail": {
-              "Url":    "http://www.example.com/image/481989943",
-              "Height": 125,
-              "Width":  "100"
-          },
-          "IDs": [116, 943, 234, 38793]
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 7]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-        }
-   }
-
-   Its Image member is an object whose Thumbnail member is an object
-   and whose IDs member is an array of numbers.
-
-   This is a JSON array containing two objects:
-
-   [
-      {
-         "precision": "zip",
-         "Latitude":  37.7668,
-         "Longitude": -122.3959,
-         "Address":   "",
-         "City":      "SAN FRANCISCO",
-         "State":     "CA",
-         "Zip":       "94107",
-         "Country":   "US"
-      },
-      {
-         "precision": "zip",
-         "Latitude":  37.371991,
-         "Longitude": -122.026020,
-         "Address":   "",
-         "City":      "SUNNYVALE",
-         "State":     "CA",
-         "Zip":       "94085",
-         "Country":   "US"
-      }
-   ]
-
-9. References
-
-9.1.  Normative References
-
-   [ECMA]    European Computer Manufacturers Association, "ECMAScript
-             Language Specification 3rd Edition", December 1999,
-             <http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/
-             ecma-st/ECMA-262.pdf>.
-
-   [RFC0020] Cerf, V., "ASCII format for network interchange", RFC 20,
-             October 1969.
-
-   [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
-             Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
-
-   [RFC4234] Crocker, D. and P.  Overell, "Augmented BNF for Syntax
-             Specifications: ABNF", RFC 4234, October 2005.
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 8]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-   [UNICODE] The Unicode Consortium, "The Unicode Standard Version 4.0",
-             2003, <http://www.unicode.org/versions/Unicode4.1.0/>.
-
-Author's Address
-
-   Douglas Crockford
-   JSON.org
-   EMail: douglas@crockford.com
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                      [Page 9]
-
-RFC 4627                          JSON                         July 2006
-
-
-Full Copyright Statement
-
-   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006).
-
-   This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions
-   contained in BCP 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors
-   retain all their rights.
-
-   This document and the information contained herein are provided on an
-   "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS
-   OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET
-   ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
-   INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE
-   INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED
-   WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
-
-Intellectual Property
-
-   The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
-   Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to
-   pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
-   this document or the extent to which any license under such rights
-   might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has
-   made any independent effort to identify any such rights.  Information
-   on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be
-   found in BCP 78 and BCP 79.
-
-   Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any
-   assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an
-   attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of
-   such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this
-   specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at
-   http://www.ietf.org/ipr.
-
-   The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
-   copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
-   rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement
-   this standard.  Please address the information to the IETF at
-   ietf-ipr@ietf.org.
-
-Acknowledgement
-
-   Funding for the RFC Editor function is provided by the IETF
-   Administrative Support Activity (IASA).
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-Crockford                    Informational                     [Page 10]
-

http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/lib/json-lib-2.2.3-jdk15.jar
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http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/chukwa/blob/01a72e24/lib/json.jar
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diff --git a/lib/json.jar b/lib/json.jar
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