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From Ryan Svihla <rsvi...@datastax.com>
Subject Re: CQL3 vs Thrift
Date Wed, 24 Dec 2014 13:30:30 GMT
Peter,

Can you come up with some specifics? I'm always interested in finding more
corner cases, but it's also possible I have a modeling alternative that you
may not have considered yet, regardless it's good practice and background
for me.

On Tue, Dec 23, 2014 at 12:26 PM, Peter Lin <woolfel@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> I'm bias in favor of using both thrift and CQL3, though many people on the
> list probably think I'm crazy.
>
> CQL3 is good if what you need fits nicely in static columns, but it
> doesn't if you want to use dynamic columns and/or mix & match both in the
> same columnFamily. For a lot of what I use Cassandra for, CQL3 currently
> doesn't provide all the functionality. It is possible to extend CQL3
> further to make it handle 100% of the use cases that Thrift supports today.
>
> whether that will happen is anyone's guess. SQL "like" syntax is popular
> and many people understand it, but it doesn't necessarily line up perfectly
> with NoSql column databases.
>
>
> On Tue, Dec 23, 2014 at 1:00 PM, David Broyles <sj.climber@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Thanks, Ryan.  I wasn't aware of static column support, and indeed they
>> get me most of what I need.  I think the only potential inefficiency  is
>> still at query time.  Using Thrift, I could design the column family to get
>> the all the static and dynamic content in a single query.
>> If event_source and total_events are instead implemented as CQL3 statics,
>> I probably need to do two queries to get data for a given event_type
>>
>> To get event metadata (is the LIMIT 1 needed to reduce to 1 record?):
>> SELECT event_source, total_events FROM timeseries WHERE event_type =
>> 'some-type'
>>
>> To get the events:
>> SELECT insertion_time, event FROM timeseries
>>
>> As a combined query, my concern is related to the overhead of repeating
>> event_type/source/total_events (although with potentially many other pieces
>> of static information).
>>
>> More generally, do you find that tuned applications tend to use Thrift, a
>> combination of Thrift and CQL3, or is CQL3 really expected to replace
>> Thrift?
>>
>> Thanks again!
>>
>> On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 9:50 PM, Ryan Svihla <rsvihla@datastax.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Don't static columns get you what you want?
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.datastax.com/documentation/cql/3.1/cql/cql_reference/refStaticCol.html
>>>  On Dec 22, 2014 10:50 PM, "David Broyles" <sj.climber@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Although I used Cassandra 1.0.X extensively, I'm new to CQL3.  Pages
>>>> such as http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptionsThrift suggest
>>>> new projects should use CQL3.
>>>>
>>>> I'm wondering, however, if there are certain use cases not well covered
>>>> by CQL3.  Consider the standard timeseries example:
>>>>
>>>> CREATE TABLE timeseries (
>>>>    event_type text,
>>>>    insertion_time timestamp,
>>>>    event blob,
>>>>    PRIMARY KEY (event_type, insertion_time)
>>>> ) WITH CLUSTERING ORDER BY (insertion_time DESC);
>>>>
>>>> What happens if I want to store additional information that is shared
>>>> by all events in the given series (but that I don't want to include in the
>>>> row ID): e.g. the event source, a cached count of the number of events
>>>> logged to date, etc.?  I might try updating the definition as follows:
>>>>
>>>> CREATE TABLE timeseries (
>>>>    event_type text,
>>>>       event_source text,
>>>>    total_events int,
>>>>    insertion_time timestamp,
>>>>    event blob,
>>>>    PRIMARY KEY (event_type, event_source, total_events, insertion_time)
>>>> ) WITH CLUSTERING ORDER BY (insertion_time DESC);
>>>>
>>>> Is this not inefficient?  When inserting or querying via CQL3, say in
>>>> batches of up to 1000 events, won't the type/source/count be repeated 1000
>>>> times?  Please let me know if I'm misunderstanding something, or if I
>>>> should be sticking to Thrift for situations like this involving mixed
>>>> static/dynamic data.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks!
>>>>
>>>
>>
>


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Ryan Svihla

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