Where is the client running from ? 

To see if a node it keeping up with requests look at nodetool tpstats, check if the read stage is backing up. 

To see how long a read takes, use nodetool cfstats and look at the read latency. (this the latency of a read on that node, not cluster wide)

To see how long a read takes cluster wide, use the StorageProxyMBean via JConsole. 

Hope that helps. 

-----------------
Aaron Morton
Freelance Developer
@aaronmorton

On 5/03/2012, at 10:46 PM, ruslan usifov wrote:

And sum of all rq/s threads is 160??

2012/3/5 Jeesoo Shin <bsheep@gmail.com>
Thank you for reply. :)
Yes I did multiple thread.
160, 320 gave me same result.

On 3/5/12, ruslan usifov <ruslan.usifov@gmail.com> wrote:
> 2012/3/5 Jeesoo Shin <bsheep@gmail.com>
>
>> Hi all.
>>
>> I have very SLOW READ here. :-(
>> I made a cluster with three node (aws xlarge, replication = 3)
>> Cassandra version is 1.0.6
>> I have inserted 1,000,000 rows. (standard column)
>> Each row has 200 columns.
>> Each column has 16 byte key,  512 byte value.
>>
>> I used Hector createSliceQuery to get one column in a row.
>> This basic query(random row, fixed column) is created with multiple
>> thread and hit cassandra.
>>
>> I only get up to 140 request per second. Is this all I can get for read?
>> Or am I doing something wrong?
>> Interestingly, when I request rows which doesn't exist, it goes up to
>> 1600 per second.
>>
>>
> You must test read performance by paralel test (ie multiple threads). The
> result when not existent rows are more faster is result of bloom filter
>
>
>
>>
>> ANY insight, share will be extremely helpful.
>> Thank you.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Jeesoo.
>>
>