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From Apache Wiki <wikidi...@apache.org>
Subject [Cassandra Wiki] Trivial Update of "GettingStarted" by TylerHobbs
Date Sat, 20 Oct 2012 21:49:34 GMT
Dear Wiki user,

You have subscribed to a wiki page or wiki category on "Cassandra Wiki" for change notification.

The "GettingStarted" page has been changed by TylerHobbs:
http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/GettingStarted?action=diff&rev1=69&rev2=70

Comment:
Fix various typos

  == Step 2: Basic Configuration ==
   
  The Cassandra configuration files can be found in the `conf` directory of binary and source
distributions.
- If you have installed Cassandra from a deb or rpm package, the configuration files will
located in `/etc/cassandra`.
+ If you have installed Cassandra from a deb or rpm package, the configuration files will
be located in `/etc/cassandra`.
   
  === Step 2.1: Directories Used by Cassandra ===
  If you've installed Cassandra with a deb or rpm package, the directories that Cassandra
will use should already be created an have the correct permissions. Otherwise, you will want
to check the following config settings.
@@ -47, +47 @@

  === Step 2.2: Configure Memory Usage (Optional) ===
  By default, Cassandra will allocate memory based on physical memory your system has, using
somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2 of the available RAM. 
  
- If you want to specify Cassandra heap size explicitly, edit `conf/cassandra-env.sh`, find
the following lines, uncomment them, and change their values:
+ If you want to specify how much memory Cassandra should use explicitly, edit `conf/cassandra-env.sh`,
find the following lines, uncomment them, and change their values:
  {{{
  #MAX_HEAP_SIZE="4G"
  #HEAP_NEWSIZE="800M"
@@ -56, +56 @@

  
  
  == Step 3: Start Cassandra ==
- And now for the moment of truth, start up Cassandra by invoking `bin/cassandra -f` from
the command line<<FootNote(To learn more about controlling the behavior of startup scripts,
see RunningCassandra.)>>. The service should start in the foreground and log gratuitously
to the console. Assuming you don't see messages with scary words like "error", or "fatal",
or anything that looks like a Java stack trace, then everything should be working.
+ And now for the moment of truth, start up Cassandra by invoking '`bin/cassandra -f`' from
the command line<<FootNote(To learn more about controlling the behavior of startup scripts,
see RunningCassandra.)>>. The service should start in the foreground and log gratuitously
to the console. Assuming you don't see messages with scary words like "error", or "fatal",
or anything that looks like a Java stack trace, then everything should be working.
  
  Press "Control-C" to stop Cassandra.
  
- If you start up Cassandra without "-f" option, it will run in background. You can stop the
process by killing it, using `pkill -f CassandraDaemon`, for example.
+ If you start up Cassandra without the "-f" option, it will run in the background. You can
stop the process by killing it, using '`pkill -f CassandraDaemon`', for example.
  
  == Step 4: Using cassandra-cli ==
  
- `bin/cassandra-cli` is a interactive command line interface for Cassandra. You can alter
the schema and interact with data using the cli.
+ `bin/cassandra-cli` is an interactive command line interface for Cassandra. You can alter
the schema and interact with data using the cli.
- Run following command to connect to your Cassandra instance.
+ Run the following command to connect to your local Cassandra instance:
  {{{
  bin/cassandra-cli
  }}}
  
+ You should see the following prompt, if successful:
- Then you will see following cassandra-cli prompt.
- 
  {{{
  Connected to: "Test Cluster" on 127.0.0.1/9160
  Welcome to Cassandra CLI version 1.0.7

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