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From acosent...@apache.org
Subject [camel] branch master updated: CAMEL-11497: Migrate 'Working with Camel and ...' guides and related docs (#2512)
Date Fri, 07 Sep 2018 09:55:27 GMT
This is an automated email from the ASF dual-hosted git repository.

acosentino pushed a commit to branch master
in repository https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/camel.git


The following commit(s) were added to refs/heads/master by this push:
     new f303135  CAMEL-11497: Migrate 'Working with Camel and ...' guides and related docs (#2512)
f303135 is described below

commit f303135d22d7dad4a68102f54ad3ea869d2ce500
Author: Tadayoshi Sato <sato.tadayoshi@gmail.com>
AuthorDate: Fri Sep 7 18:55:24 2018 +0900

    CAMEL-11497: Migrate 'Working with Camel and ...' guides and related docs (#2512)
---
 docs/user-manual/en/SUMMARY.md                     |   21 +-
 docs/user-manual/en/component.adoc                 |   42 +
 docs/user-manual/en/examples.adoc                  |   55 ++
 docs/user-manual/en/guice-jms-example.adoc         |   61 ++
 docs/user-manual/en/guice-maven-plugin.adoc        |  160 +++
 docs/user-manual/en/guice.adoc                     |  155 +++
 docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-add-a-component.adoc  |   72 ++
 ...spring-property-placeholder-with-camel-xml.adoc |   77 ++
 docs/user-manual/en/producertemplate.adoc          |  103 ++
 docs/user-manual/en/route-builder.adoc             |   10 +-
 docs/user-manual/en/uris.adoc                      |   28 +
 docs/user-manual/en/using-propertyplaceholder.adoc | 1032 ++++++++++++++++++++
 docs/user-manual/en/writing-components.adoc        |  158 +++
 13 files changed, 1960 insertions(+), 14 deletions(-)

diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/SUMMARY.md b/docs/user-manual/en/SUMMARY.md
index e72393e..dc14a25 100644
--- a/docs/user-manual/en/SUMMARY.md
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/SUMMARY.md
@@ -15,6 +15,7 @@
     * [Camel Core](camel-core.adoc)
     * [CamelContext](camelcontext.adoc)
     * [CEP](cep.adoc)
+    * [Component](component.adoc)
     * [Debugger](debugger.adoc)
     * [Delay Interceptor](delay-interceptor.adoc)
     * [Dependency Injection](dependency-injection.adoc)
@@ -41,14 +42,13 @@
     * [OnCompletion](oncompletion.adoc)
     * [Predicate](predicate.adoc)
     * [Registry](registry.adoc)
-    * [Scala DSL](scala-dsl.adoc)
+    * [RouteBuilder](route-builder.adoc)
+    * [Routes](routes.adoc)
 
 <!--
     * [Pluggable Class Resolvers](.adoc)
     * [Processor](.adoc)
-    * [RouteBuilder](.adoc)
     * [RoutePolicy](.adoc)
-    * [Routes](.adoc)
     * [ServicePool](.adoc)
     * [Stream caching](.adoc)
     * [ToAsync](.adoc)
@@ -544,27 +544,28 @@
 
 
 
-* Example
+* [Examples](examples.adoc)
     * [BAM Example](bam-example.adoc)
+    * [Guice JMS Example](guice-jms-example.adoc)
 
 * User Guide
 
     * [Camel JAR Dependencies](camel-jar-dependencies.adoc)
     * [Camel Boot](camel-boot.adoc)
-    * [Working with Camel and CDI]
-    * [Working with Camel and Spring]
-    * [Working with Camel and Guice]
+    * [Working with Camel and CDI](../../../components/camel-cdi/src/main/docs/cdi.adoc)
+    * [Working with Camel and Spring](spring.adoc)
+    * [Working with Camel and Guice](guice.adoc)
     * [Working with Camel and Karaf](karaf.adoc)
     * [How Do I Configure Endpoints?]
-    * [Bean Integration]
+    * [Bean Integration](bean-integration.adoc)
     * [Configuring Camel]
     * [Configuring route startup ordering and autostartup]
     * [Graceful Shutdown]
     * [AsyncProcessorAwaitManager] for insight into the routing engine when it has been forced to block threads while exchanges are being processed asynchronous.
     * [Error handling in Camel](error-handling-in-camel.adoc)
-    * [How to use Camel property placeholders]
+    * [How to use Camel property placeholders](using-propertyplaceholder.adoc)
     * [Tutorials]
-    * [Examples]
+    * [Examples](examples.adoc)
     * [Testing](testing.adoc)
         * [Test](test.adoc)
         * [Blueprint Testing](test-blueprint.adoc)
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/component.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/component.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fa801b3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/component.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,42 @@
+[[Component-Components]]
+=== Components
+
+A Component is essentially a factory of link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint] instances.
+
+You can explicitly configure Component instances
+and add them to a link:camelcontext.adoc[CamelContext] in an IoC
+container like Spring or Guice, or they can be auto-discovered using
+link:uris.adoc[URIs].
+
+[[Component-ComponentsIncluded]]
+==== Components Included
+
+Camel includes the following Component implementations via link:uris.adoc[URIs].
+
+[IMPORTANT]
+====
+Make sure to read link:how-do-i-configure-endpoints.adoc[How do I configure endpoints?]
+to learn more about configuring endpoints. For
+example how to refer to beans in the link:registry.adoc[Registry] or how
+to use raw values for password options, and using
+link:using-propertyplaceholder.adoc[property placeholders] etc.
+====
+
+===== Core Components
+
+include::../../../camel-core/readme.adoc[]
+
+===== Components
+
+include::../../../components/readme.adoc[]
+
+
+[[Component-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint]
+* link:uris.adoc[URIs]
+* link:writing-components.adoc[Writing Components]
+* link:how-do-i-add-a-component.adoc[How do I add a component]
+* link:how-do-i-configure-endpoints.adoc[How do I configure endpoints?]
+* link:using-propertyplaceholder.adoc[Using `PropertyPlaceholder`]
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/examples.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/examples.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e9939bb
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/examples.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,55 @@
+[[Examples-Examples]]
+=== Examples
+
+Once you have read about link:getting-started.adoc[Getting Started] and
+looked at the link:enterprise-integration-patterns.adoc[Enterprise
+Integration Patterns], you might want to try out some examples.
+
+Before starting to work on example you may want to
+link:what-are-the-dependencies.adoc[check the requirements for working
+with Camel]. Then link:running-examples.adoc[Running Examples] describes
+how to get the examples to run
+
+
+[[Examples-Walk-throughs]]
+==== Walk-throughs
+
+* Walk through the code of a
+link:walk-through-an-example.adoc[beginner's example] so you can
+understand how things fit together using the Java link:dsl.adoc[DSL] to
+set up some routes in a simple `main(...)` method.
+* Walk through the link:walk-through-another-example.adoc[Spring DSL
+example] to look at XML-based routing.
+* Walk through the link:console-example.adoc[Console Example] to
+practice reading input from the console.
+
+[NOTE]
+====
+The examples listed below are hosted at Apache. We also offer the
+link:articles.adoc[Articles] page as a collection of 3rd-party Camel
+material - such as tutorials, blog posts, published articles, videos,
+podcasts, presentations, and so forth.
+
+If you have written a Camel-related article, then we are happy to
+provide a link to it. You can contact the Camel link:team.adoc[Team] via
+our link:mailing-lists.adoc[Mailing Lists], or simply post a tweet with
+the words "Apache Camel".
+====
+
+
+[[Examples-Examples.1]]
+==== Examples
+
+Browse the examples from github where each example is documented and up
+to date:
+
+https://github.com/apache/camel/tree/master/examples#welcome-to-the-apache-camel-examples
+
+
+[[Examples-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* link:tutorials.adoc[Tutorials]
+* link:cookbook.adoc[Cookbook]
+* link:enterprise-integration-patterns.adoc[Enterprise Integration
+Patterns]
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/guice-jms-example.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/guice-jms-example.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..beeb78f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/guice-jms-example.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,61 @@
+[[GuiceJMSExample-GuiceJMSExample]]
+=== Guice JMS Example
+
+*Available as of Camel 1.5 onwards*
+
+The Guice JMS example is functionally similar to both the
+link:walk-through-an-example.adoc[first example] and the
+link:spring-example.adoc[Spring Example] but using
+link:guice.adoc[Guice] as the Dependency Injection framework.
+
+In this example we just write RouteBuilder implementations, then we
+write a Guice module
+https://github.com/apache/camel/blob/master/examples/camel-example-guice-jms/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/guice/jms/MyModule.java[MyModule]
+to create the CamelContext, bind any RouteBuilder instances and
+configure any components and endpoints, then we create a
+https://github.com/apache/camel/blob/master/examples/camel-example-guice-jms/src/main/resources/guicejndi.properties[guicejndi.properties]
+file to bootstrap Guice and Camel.
+
+To run the example we currently use the maven exec plugin. For example
+from the source or binary distribution the following should work
+
+[source,brush:,java;,gutter:,false;,theme:,Default]
+----
+cd examples/camel-example-guice-jms
+mvn compile exec:java
+----
+
+What this does is boot up the Guice based JNDI provider from
+https://github.com/apache/camel/blob/master/examples/camel-example-guice-jms/src/main/resources/guicejndi.properties[guicejndi.properties]
+file on the classpath. This then bootstraps the Guice injector and loads
+whatever Guice modules are defined in the guicejndi.properties file --
+then injects the remaining properties in the file.
+
+
+[[GuiceJMSExample-ConfiguringComponents]]
+==== Configuring Components
+
+If you see the `jms()` method of the Guice
+https://github.com/apache/camel/blob/master/examples/camel-example-guice-jms/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/guice/jms/MyModule.java[MyModule]
+you will see it is annotated with `@Provides` to indicate to Guice that
+it is a provider and it is annotated with `@JndiBind("jms")` to bind it
+to the JNDI name `jms` when it is created.
+
+This method then configures the component. The provider method is
+parameterized by the `@Named("activemq.brokerURL")` property which is
+injected from the
+https://github.com/apache/camel/blob/master/examples/camel-example-guice-jms/src/main/resources/guicejndi.properties[guicejndi.properties]
+file. This lets you define the properties which should be environment
+specific (such as URLs, machine names, usernames/passwords and so forth)
+while leaving all of the other configuration which does not change in
+different environments in Java code.
+
+So you can use link:guice.adoc[Guice] to dependency inject whatever
+objects you need to create, be it an link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint],
+link:component.adoc[Component], link:route-builder.adoc[RouteBuilder] or
+arbitrary link:bean-integration.adoc[bean used within a route]. Then you
+can inject any properties from the jndi.properties file easily -- so that
+most of your configuration is all in Java code which is typesafe and
+easily refactorable - then leaving some properties to be environment
+specific (the guicejndi.properties file) which you can then change based
+on development, testing, production, etc.
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/guice-maven-plugin.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/guice-maven-plugin.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..43820c9
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/guice-maven-plugin.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,160 @@
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-GuiceMavenPlugin]]
+=== Guice Maven Plugin
+
+The Guice Maven Plugin allows you to run your
+link:enterprise-integration-patterns.adoc[Enterprise Integration
+Patterns] using link:guice.adoc[Guice] for
+link:dependency-injection.adoc[Dependency Injection] inside Maven along
+with being able to support link:visualisation.adoc[Visualisation] along
+with integration of the link:visualisation.adoc[Visualisation] diagrams
+into the standard maven reports for your project.
+
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-GoalsSupported]]
+==== Goals Supported
+
+[width="100%",cols="34%,66%",options="header",]
+|=======================================================================
+|Goal |Description
+|link:guice-run-maven-goal.adoc[guice:run]
+|Boots up Camel in the context of a separately initiated Java thread
+using the link:guice.adoc[Guice] configuration in the `jndi.properties`
+file on the classpath and runs your routing rules
+
+|link:guice-embedded-maven-goal.adoc[guice:embedded]
+|Boots up Camel using the link:guice.adoc[Guice] configuration at
+`jndi.properties` on the classpath and runs your routing rules
+
+|link:guice-dot-maven-goal.adoc[guice:dot]
+|Generates DOT files and then HTML, PNG, SVG files for your EIP routing
+rules with integration into Maven Reports
+|=======================================================================
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-Addingtheplugintoyourpom.xml]]
+==== Adding the plugin to your pom.xml
+
+Add the following in your `<build><plugins>` section
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<plugin>
+  <groupId>org.apache.camel</groupId>
+  <artifactId>guice-maven-plugin</artifactId>
+</plugin>
+----
+
+You can also specify what Main class to use when running the plugin. By
+default this is `org.apache.camel.guice.Main`.
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<plugin>
+  <groupId>org.apache.camel</groupId>
+  <artifactId>guice-maven-plugin</artifactId>
+  <!-- optional, default value: org.apache.camel.guice.Main -->
+  <configuration>
+    <mainClass>mypackage.boot.camel.CamelStartup</mainClass>
+  </configuration>
+</plugin>
+----
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-MakinguseofanoptionalJNDIpropertiesfile]]
+==== Making use of an optional JNDI properties file
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.13.0*
+
+Optionally if the name of your JNDI properties file is something else
+other than the default `jndi.properties` or if it's not on the default
+classpath, then you can make use of the `jndiProperties` option as shown
+below:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<plugin>
+  <groupId>org.apache.camel</groupId>
+  <artifactId>guice-maven-plugin</artifactId>
+  <configuration>
+    <jndiProperties>/path/to/my/jndi/properties/my-guice-jndi.properties</jndiProperties>
+  </configuration>
+</plugin>
+----
+
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-Classpath]]
+==== Classpath
+
+The plugin will construct a classpath of any Maven dependency with scope
+`compile`. The classpath is output as an `INFO` log statement upon
+startup.
+
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-RouteInformation]]
+==== Route Information
+
+Information about the generated routes is available through the GraphViz
+report, and also through the log statements generated by the run goal.
+If you would like to see this information then add a log4j (or other
+commons-logging implementation) config file with the following levels.
+
+===== src/main/resources/log4.properties
+
+[source,java]
+----
+log4j.rootLogger=INFO, stdout
+log4j.appender.stdout=org.apache.log4j.ConsoleAppender
+log4j.appender.stdout.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout
+log4j.appender.stdout.layout.ConversionPattern=%-4r [%t] %-5p %c %x - %m%n
+
+log4j.logger.org.apache.camel.impl.DefaultCamelContext=DEBUG, stdout
+log4j.additivity.org.apache.camel.impl.DefaultCamelContext=false
+----
+
+This should produce a log statement similar to:
+
+....
+670  [org.apache.camel.guice.Main.main()] DEBUG org.apache.camel.impl.DefaultCamelContext - Adding routes from: Routes: [Route[ [From[jms:queue:queueA]] -> [To[jms:queue:queueB], To[jms:queue:queueC]]]] routes: []
+....
+
+
+[[GuiceMavenPlugin-IntegrationintoMavenReports]]
+==== Integration into Maven Reports
+
+If you add the guice-maven-plugin to your `<reporting>` section of your
+pom you will automatically get the
+link:visualisation.adoc[Visualisation] reporting generated for your
+project as part of the regular maven site generation.
+
+For example add the following into your pom:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<project>
+  ...
+  <reporting>
+    <plugins>
+      <plugin>
+        <groupId>org.apache.camel</groupId>
+        <artifactId>guice-maven-plugin</artifactId>
+      </plugin>
+    </plugins>
+  </reporting>  
+</project>
+----
+
+Then when you run:
+
+....
+mvn site
+....
+
+Your context will be booted up via the `jndi.properties` files, the DOT
+file generated and a nice HTML report created.
+
+===== GraphViz DOT required
+
+Note to get the nice HTML, PNG and SVG outputs from the DOT files you
+will need to install the http://graphviz.org[GraphViz] DOT executable
+and add it to your PATH so that the plugin can invoke DOT to generate
+the PNG/SVG files.
+
+For more details see the link:camel-dot-maven-goal.adoc[guice:dot].
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/guice.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/guice.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..36650e8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/guice.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,155 @@
+[[Guice-CamelGuice]]
+=== Camel Guice
+
+We have support for https://github.com/google/guice[Google Guice]
+as a dependency injection framework.
+
+Maven users will need to add the following dependency to their `pom.xml`
+for this component:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<dependency>
+    <groupId>org.apache.camel</groupId>
+    <artifactId>camel-guice</artifactId>
+    <version>x.x.x</version>
+    <!-- use the same version as your Camel core version -->
+</dependency>
+----
+
+[[Guice-DependencyInjectingCamelwithGuice]]
+==== Dependency Injecting Camel with Guice
+
+The
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-guice/apidocs/org/apache/camel/guice/GuiceCamelContext.html[GuiceCamelContext]
+is designed to work nicely inside Guice. You then need to bind it using
+some Guice Module.
+
+The camel-guice library comes with a number of reusable Guice Modules
+you can use if you wish - or you can bind the GuiceCamelContext yourself
+in your own module.
+
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-guice/apidocs/org/apache/camel/guice/CamelModule.html[CamelModule]
+is the base module which binds the GuiceCamelContext but leaves it up
+you to bind the RouteBuilder instances
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-guice/apidocs/org/apache/camel/guice/CamelModuleWithRouteTypes.html[CamelModuleWithRouteTypes]
+extends CamelModule so that in the constructor of the module you specify
+the RouteBuilder classes or instances to use
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-guice/apidocs/org/apache/camel/guice/CamelModuleWithMatchingRoutes.html[CamelModuleWithMatchingRoutes]
+extends CamelModule so that all bound RouteBuilder instances will be
+injected into the CamelContext or you can supply an optional Matcher to
+find RouteBuilder instances matching some kind of predicate.
+
+So you can specify the exact link:route-builder.adoc[RouteBuilder]
+instances you want:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new CamelModuleWithRouteTypes(MyRouteBuilder.class, AnotherRouteBuilder.class));
+// if required you can lookup the CamelContext
+CamelContext camelContext = injector.getInstance(CamelContext.class);
+----
+
+Or inject them all:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new CamelModuleWithRouteTypes());
+// if required you can lookup the CamelContext
+CamelContext camelContext = injector.getInstance(CamelContext.class);
+----
+
+You can then use Guice in the usual way to inject the route instances or
+any other dependent objects.
+
+[[Guice-BootstrappingwithJNDI]]
+==== Bootstrapping with JNDI
+
+A common pattern used in J2EE is to bootstrap your application or root
+objects by looking them up in JNDI. This has long been the approach when
+working with JMS for example - looking up the JMS ConnectionFactory in
+JNDI for example.
+
+You can follow a similar pattern with Guice using the
+https://code.google.com/archive/p/guiceyfruit/wikis/JNDI.wiki[GuiceyFruit JNDI
+Provider] which lets you bootstrap Guice from a `jndi.properties` file
+which can include the Guice Modules to create along with environment
+specific properties you can inject into your modules and objects.
+
+If the `jndi.properties` is conflict with other component, you can
+specify the jndi properties file name in the Guice Main with option `-j`
+or `-jndiProperties` with the properties file location to let Guice Main
+to load right jndi properties file.
+
+[[Guice-ConfiguringComponent,EndpointorRouteBuilderinstances]]
+==== Configuring Component, Endpoint or RouteBuilder instances
+
+You can use Guice to dependency inject whatever objects
+you need to create, be it an link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint],
+link:component.adoc[Component], link:route-builder.adoc[RouteBuilder] or
+arbitrary link:bean-integration.adoc[bean used within a route].
+
+The easiest way to do this is to create your own Guice Module class
+which extends one of the above module classes and add a provider method
+for each object you wish to create. A provider method is annotated with
+`@Provides` as follows:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+public class MyModule extends CamelModuleWithMatchingRoutes {
+
+    @Provides
+    @JndiBind("jms")
+    JmsComponent jms(@Named("activemq.brokerURL") String brokerUrl) {
+        return JmsComponent.jmsComponent(new ActiveMQConnectionFactory(brokerUrl));
+    }
+}
+----
+
+You can optionally annotate the method with `@JndiBind` to bind the
+object to JNDI at some name if the object is a component, endpoint or
+bean you wish to refer to by name in your routes.
+
+You can inject any environment specific properties (such as URLs,
+machine names, usernames/passwords and so forth) from the
+`jndi.properties` file easily using the `@Named` annotation as shown
+above. This allows most of your configuration to be in Java code which
+is typesafe and easily refactorable - then leaving some properties to be
+environment specific (the `jndi.properties` file) which you can then
+change based on development, testing, production, etc.
+
+[[Guice-CreatingmultipleRouteBuilderinstancespertype]]
+==== Creating multiple RouteBuilder instances per type
+
+It is sometimes useful to create multiple instances of a particular
+link:route-builder.adoc[RouteBuilder] with different configurations.
+
+To do this just create multiple provider methods for each configuration;
+or create a single provider method that returns a collection of
+RouteBuilder instances.
+
+For example:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+import org.apache.camel.guice.CamelModuleWithMatchingRoutes;
+import com.google.common.collect.Lists;
+
+public class MyModule extends CamelModuleWithMatchingRoutes {
+
+    @Provides
+    @JndiBind("foo")
+    Collection<RouteBuilder> foo(@Named("fooUrl") String fooUrl) {
+        return Lists.newArrayList(new MyRouteBuilder(fooUrl), new MyRouteBuilder("activemq:CheeseQueue"));
+    }
+}
+----
+
+[[Guice-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* There are a number of link:examples.adoc[Examples] you can look at to
+see Guice and Camel being used such as link:guice-jms-example.adoc[Guice
+JMS Example]
+* link:guice-maven-plugin.adoc[Guice Maven Plugin] for running your
+Guice based routes via Maven
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-add-a-component.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-add-a-component.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9541e2d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-add-a-component.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,72 @@
+[[HowdoIaddacomponent-HowdoIaddacomponent]]
+=== How do I add a component
+
+You might first want to read link:writing-components.adoc[Writing
+Components] for a background in how to implement a new component.
+Typically it means you write an implementation of the
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Component.html[Component]
+interface, usually deriving from
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/impl/DefaultComponent.html[DefaultComponent].
+
+You can then register your component explicitly via:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+CamelContext context = new DefaultCamelContext();
+context.addComponent("foo", new FooComponent(context));
+----
+
+However you can use the auto-discovery feature of Camel where by Camel
+will automatically add a link:component.adoc[Component] when an endpoint
+URI is used. To do this you would create a file called:
+
+....
+/META-INF/services/org/apache/camel/component/foo
+....
+
+with contents:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+class=org.acme.FooComponent
+----
+
+(You can add other property configurations in there too if you like.)
+
+Then if you refer to an endpoint as `foo://somethingOrOther` Camel
+will auto-discover your component and register it.
+
+The `FooComponent` can then be auto-injected with resources using the
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/spi/Injector.html[Injector],
+such as to support link:spring.adoc[Spring] based auto-wiring, or to
+support `@Resource` (EJB3 style) injection or Guice style `@Inject`
+injection.
+
+
+[[HowdoIaddacomponent-WorkingwithSpringXML]]
+==== Working with Spring XML
+
+You can configure a component via Spring using the following mechanism:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-jms/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/component/jms/jmsRouteUsingSpring.xml[]
+
+Which allows you to configure a component using some name (activemq in the
+above example), then you can refer to the component using
+`activemq:[queue:|topic:]destinationName`.
+
+If you want to add explicit Spring 2.x XML objects to your XML then you
+could use the `xbean-spring` which tries to automate most of the XML
+binding work for you; or you could look in camel-spring
+at `CamelNamespaceHandler` you'll see how we handle the Spring XML
+stuff (warning it's kinda hairy code to look at :smile:).
+If you wanted `<fooComponent>` to be a standard part of the core Camel
+schema then you'd hack that file to add your component &
+link:contributing.adoc[contribute a patch] to the camel XSD. Otherwise
+you could write your own namespace & schema if you prefer.
+
+
+[[HowdoIaddacomponent-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* link:writing-components.adoc[Writing Components]
+* link:how-do-i-configure-endpoints.adoc[How do I configure endpoints?]
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-use-spring-property-placeholder-with-camel-xml.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-use-spring-property-placeholder-with-camel-xml.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..7b9283c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/how-do-i-use-spring-property-placeholder-with-camel-xml.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,77 @@
+[[HowdoIuseSpringPropertyPlaceholderwithCamelXML-HowdoIuseSpringPropertyPlaceholderwithCamelXML]]
+=== How do I use Spring Property Placeholder with Camel XML
+
+We do *NOT* yet support the `${something}` notation inside arbitrary
+Camel XML. For example at the time of writing this is *NOT* supported
+(due Spring limitations).
+
+*IS NOT SUPPORTED*
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
+       xsi:schemaLocation="
+       http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.0.xsd
+       http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring/camel-spring.xsd
+    ">
+
+  <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer"/>
+
+  <camelContext xmlns="http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring">
+    <route>
+      <from uri="activemq:${someQueueName}"/>
+      <to uri="mock:results"/>
+    </route>
+  </camelContext>
+
+</beans>
+----
+
+However you can use the `<endpoint/>` element to define endpoints which
+does support the property resolving which you can then refer to by name,
+using the <<ref-component,Ref>> component as shown below (notice the `ref:`
+in the URI):
+
+*SUPPORTED*
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
+       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
+       xsi:schemaLocation="
+       http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.0.xsd
+       http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring/camel-spring.xsd
+    ">
+
+  <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer"/>
+
+  <camelContext xmlns="http://activemq.apache.org/camel/schema/spring">
+    <endpoint id="input1" uri="activemq:${someQueueName}"/>
+
+    <route>
+      <from uri="ref:input1"/>
+      <to uri="activemq:OutputQueue"/>
+    </route>
+  </camelContext>
+
+</beans>
+----
+
+Camel does not yet fully support property placeholders as there is a
+limitation in Spring. See JIRA
+http://jira.springframework.org/browse/SPR-4466[SPR-4466]
+
+===== Bridge Spring and Camel property placeholders
+
+From Camel 2.10 onwards you can bridge Spring and Camel property
+placeholders, see link:using-propertyplaceholder.adoc[Using
+PropertyPlaceholder] for more details.
+
+Here is a trick that you can use to define the uri in a property file
+using Spring injection and Camel endpoint:
+http://cmoulliard.blogspot.com/2009/05/trick-to-pass-uri-declared-in-property.html.
+
+From Camel 2.3 onwards there is a <<properties-component,Properties>>
+component build in Camel core which allows you to use properties in the
+same way as Spring property placeholders, and even more.
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/producertemplate.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/producertemplate.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e6348a5
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/producertemplate.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,103 @@
+[[ProducerTemplate-ProducerTemplate]]
+=== ProducerTemplate
+
+The ProducerTemplate interface allows you to send message exchanges to
+endpoints in a variety of different ways to make it easy to work with
+Camel link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint] instances from Java code.
+
+It can be configured with a default endpoint if you just want to send
+lots of messages to the same endpoint; or you can specify an
+link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint] or uri as the first parameter.
+
+The `sendBody()` method allows you to send any object to an endpoint
+easily.
+
+[source,java]
+----
+ProducerTemplate template = exchange.getContext().createProducerTemplate();
+
+// send to default endpoint
+template.sendBody("<hello>world!</hello>");
+
+// send to a specific queue
+template.sendBody("activemq:MyQueue", "<hello>world!</hello>");
+
+// send with a body and header
+template.sendBodyAndHeader("activemq:MyQueue",
+   "<hello>world!</hello>",
+   "CustomerRating", "Gold");
+----
+
+You can also supply an `Exchange` or a `Processor` to customize the exchange.
+
+
+[[ProducerTemplate-requestmethods]]
+==== `request*()` methods
+
+The `send*()` methods use the default Message Exchange Pattern (InOnly,
+InOut etc) as the endpoint. If you want to explicitly perform a
+request/response (InOut) you can use the `request*()` methods instead of
+the `send*()` methods.
+
+E.g. let's invoke an endpoint and get the response:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Object response = template.requestBody("<hello/>");
+
+// you can cast the response directly
+String ret = template.requestBody("<hello/>", String.class);
+
+// or specify the endpoint directly
+String ret = template.requestBody("cxf:bean:HelloWorldService", "<hello/>", String.class);
+----
+
+
+[[ProducerTemplate-Fluentinterface]]
+==== Fluent interface
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.18.0*
+
+The FluentProducerTemplate provides a fluent syntax to
+ProducerTemplate.
+
+Examples:
+
+*Set headers and body*
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Integer result = FluentProducerTemplate.on(context)
+    .withHeader("key-1", "value-1")
+    .withHeader("key-2", "value-2")
+    .withBody("Hello")
+    .to("direct:inout")
+    .request(Integer.class);
+----
+
+*Use a processor*
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Integer result = FluentProducerTemplate.on(context)
+    .withProcessor(exchange -> exchange.getIn().setBody("Hello World"))
+    .to("direct:exception")
+    .request(Integer.class);
+----
+
+*Customize template*
+
+[source,java]
+----
+Object result = FluentProducerTemplate.on(context)
+    .withTemplateCustomizer(
+        template -> {
+            template.setExecutorService(myExecutor);
+            template.setMaximumCacheSize(10);
+        }
+    )
+    .withBody("the body")
+    .to("direct:start")
+    .request();
+ 
+----
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/route-builder.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/route-builder.adoc
index a021f9d..b5adcfe 100644
--- a/docs/user-manual/en/route-builder.adoc
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/route-builder.adoc
@@ -1,9 +1,11 @@
 [[RouteBuilder-RouteBuilder]]
-RouteBuilder
-~~~~~~~~~~~~
-The RouteBuilder is a base class which is derived from to create routing rules using the DSL. Instances of RouteBuilder are then added to the CamelContext.
+=== RouteBuilder
+
+The RouteBuilder is a base class which is derived from to create routing rules using the DSL.
+Instances of RouteBuilder are then added to the CamelContext.
+
+==== See Also
 
-See Also
 * link:camelcontext.adoc[CamelContext]
 * link:routes.adoc[Routes]
 * link:architecture.adoc[Architecture]
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/uris.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/uris.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..54a6c45
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/uris.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,28 @@
+[[URIs-URIs]]
+=== URIs
+
+Camel makes extensive use of URIs to allow you to refer to endpoints
+which are lazily created by a link:component.adoc[Component] if you
+refer to them within link:routes.adoc[Routes].
+
+[IMPORTANT]
+====
+Make sure to read
+link:how-do-i-configure-endpoints.adoc[How do I configure endpoints]
+to learn more about configuring endpoints. For
+example how to refer to beans in the link:registry.adoc[Registry] or how
+to use raw values for password options, and using
+link:using-propertyplaceholder.adoc[property placeholders] etc.
+====
+
+
+[[URIs-CurrentSupportedURIs]]
+==== Current Supported URIs
+
+===== Core Components
+
+include::../../../camel-core/readme.adoc[]
+
+===== Components
+
+include::../../../components/readme.adoc[]
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/using-propertyplaceholder.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/using-propertyplaceholder.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4f016b1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/using-propertyplaceholder.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,1032 @@
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingPropertyPlaceholder]]
+=== Using `PropertyPlaceholder`
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.3*
+
+Camel now provides a new `PropertiesComponent` in `camel-core` which
+allows you to use property placeholders when defining Camel
+link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint] URIs. This works much like you would do if
+using Spring's `<property-placeholder>` tag. However Spring has a
+limitation that prevents third-party frameworks from fully leveraging
+Spring property placeholders.
+
+For more details see:
+link:how-do-i-use-spring-property-placeholder-with-camel-xml.adoc[How do
+I use Spring Property Placeholder with Camel XML].
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-BridgingSpringandCamelPropertyPlaceholders]]
+===== Bridging Spring and Camel Property Placeholders
+
+From *Camel 2.10*: Spring's property placeholder can be bridged with
+Camel's. See below for more details.
+
+The property placeholder is typically used when trying to do any of the
+following:
+
+* Lookup or creating endpoints
+* Lookup of beans in the link:registry.adoc[Registry]
+* Additional supported in Spring XML (see below in examples)
+* Using Blueprint `PropertyPlaceholder` with Camel
+<<properties-component,Properties>> component
+* Using `@PropertyInject` to inject a property in a POJO
+* *Camel 2.14.1* Using default value if a property does not exists
+* *Camel 2.14.1* Include out of the box functions, to lookup property
+values from OS environment variables, JVM system properties, or the
+service idiom
+* *Camel 2.14.1* Using custom functions, which can be plugged into the
+property component
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-Format]]
+==== Format
+
+The value of a Camel property can be obtained by specifying its key name
+within a property placeholder, using the following format: `{{key}}`
+
+For example:
+....
+{{file.uri}}
+....
+
+where `file.uri` is the property key.
+
+Property placeholders can be used to specify parts, or all, of an
+endpoint's URI by embedding one or more placeholders in the URI's string
+definition.
+
+From *Camel 2.14.1*: you can specify a default value to use if a
+property with the key does not exists, e.g., `file.url:/some/path`
+where the default value is the text after the colon, e.g.,
+`/some/path`.
+
+From *Camel 2.14.1*: do _not_ use a colon in the property key. The colon
+character is used as a token separator when providing a default value.
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingPropertyResolver]]
+==== Using `PropertyResolver`
+
+Camel provides a pluggable mechanism that allows third-parties to
+specify their own resolver to use for the lookup of properties.
+
+Camel provides a default implementation
+`org.apache.camel.component.properties.DefaultPropertiesResolver`
+which is capable of loading properties from the file system, classpath
+or link:registry.adoc[Registry]. To indicate which source to use the
+location must contain the appropriate prefix.
+
+The list of prefixes is:
+
+[width="100%",cols="50%,50%",options="header",]
+|=======================================================================
+|Prefix |Description
+|`ref:` |Lookup in the link:registry.adoc[Registry.]
+
+|`file:` |Load the from file system.
+
+|`classpath:` |Load from the classpath (this is also the default if no
+prefix is provided).
+
+|`blueprint:` |Use a specific OSGi blueprint placeholder service.
+|=======================================================================
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-DefiningLocation]]
+==== Defining Location
+
+The `PropertiesResolver` must be configured with the location(s) to
+use when resolving properties. One or more locations can be given.
+Specifying multiple locations can be done a couple of ways: using either
+a single comma separated string, or an array of strings.
+
+[source,java]
+----
+pc.setLocation("com/mycompany/myprop.properties,com/mycompany/other.properties");
+pc.setLocation(new String[] {"com/mycompany/myprop.properties", "com/mycompany/other.properties"});
+----
+
+From *Camel 2.19.0*: you can set which location can be discarded if
+missing by setting  `optional=true`, (`false` by default).
+
+Example:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+pc.setLocations("com/mycompany/override.properties;optional=true,com/mycompany/defaults.properties");
+----
+ 
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingSystemandEnvironmentVariablesinLocations]]
+==== Using System and Environment Variables in Locations
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.7*
+
+The location now supports using placeholders for JVM system properties
+and OS environments variables.
+
+Example:
+....
+location=file:${karaf.home}/etc/foo.properties
+....
+
+In the location above we defined a location using the file scheme using
+the JVM system property with key `karaf.home`.
+
+To use an OS environment variable instead you would have to prefix with
+`env`:
+
+location=file:${env:APP_HOME}/etc/foo.properties
+
+Where `APP_HOME` is an OS environment variable.
+
+You can have multiple placeholders in the same location, such as:
+
+location=file:${env:APP_HOME}/etc/${prop.name}.properties
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingSystemorEnvironmentVariablestoConfigurePropertyPrefixesandSuffixes]]
+==== Using System or Environment Variables to Configure Property Prefixes and Suffixes
+
+From *Camel 2.12.5, 2.13.3, 2.14.0*: `propertyPrefix`,
+`propertySuffix` configuration properties support the use of
+placeholders for de-referencing JVM system properties and OS
+environments variables.
+
+Example:
+
+Assume the `PropertiesComponent` is configured with the following
+properties file:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+textdev.endpoint = result1
+test.endpoint = result2
+----
+
+The same properties file is then referenced from a route definition:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+PropertiesComponent pc = context.getComponent("properties",
+PropertiesComponent.class); pc.setPropertyPrefix("${stage}.");
+// ...
+context.addRoutes(new RouteBuilder() {
+    @Override
+    public void configure() throws Exception {
+        from("direct:start")
+            .to("properties:mock:{{endpoint}}");
+    }
+});
+----
+
+By using the configuration options `propertyPrefix` it's possible to
+change the target endpoint simply by changing the value of the system
+property `stage` either to `dev` (the message will be routed
+to `mock:result1`) or `test` (the message will be routed
+to `mock:result2`).
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-ConfiguringinJavaDSL]]
+==== Configuring in Java DSL
+
+You have to create and register the `PropertiesComponent` under the
+name `properties` such as:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+PropertiesComponent pc = new PropertiesComponent();
+pc.setLocation("classpath:com/mycompany/myprop.properties");
+context.addComponent("properties", pc);
+----
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-ConfiguringinSpringXML]]
+==== Configuring in Spring XML
+
+Spring XML offers two variations to configure. You can define a spring
+bean as a `PropertiesComponent` which resembles the way done in Java
+DSL. Or you can use the `<propertyPlaceholder>` tag.
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<bean id="properties" class="org.apache.camel.component.properties.PropertiesComponent">
+    <property name="location" value="classpath:com/mycompany/myprop.properties"/>
+</bean>
+----
+
+Using the `<propertyPlaceholder>` tag makes the configuration a bit
+more fresh such as:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext ...>
+    <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="com/mycompany/myprop.properties"/>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+Setting the properties location through the location tag works just fine
+but sometime you have a number of resources to take into account and
+starting from **Camel 2.19.0** you can set the properties location with
+a dedicated `propertiesLocation`:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext ...>
+    <propertyPlaceholder id="myPropertyPlaceholder">
+        <propertiesLocation resolver="classpath" path="com/my/company/something/my-properties-1.properties" optional="false"/>
+        <propertiesLocation resolver="classpath" path="com/my/company/something/my-properties-2.properties" optional="false"/>
+        <propertiesLocation resolver="file" path="${karaf.home}/etc/my-override.properties" optional="true"/>
+    </propertyPlaceholder>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+===== Specifying the cache option in XML
+
+From *Camel 2.10*: Camel supports specifying a value for the `cache`
+option both inside the Spring as well as the Blueprint XML.
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingaPropertiesfromthe]]
+==== Using a Properties from the link:registry.adoc[Registry]
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.4*
+
+For example in OSGi you may want to expose a service which returns the
+properties as a `java.util.Properties` object.
+
+Then you could setup the link:properties.adoc[Properties] component as
+follows:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="ref:myProperties"/>
+----
+
+Where `myProperties` is the id to use for lookup in the OSGi registry.
+Notice we use the `ref:` prefix to tell Camel that it should lookup
+the properties for the link:registry.adoc[Registry].
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-ExamplesUsingPropertiesComponent]]
+==== Examples Using Properties Component
+
+When using property placeholders in the endpoint URIs you can either use
+the `properties:` component or define the placeholders directly in the
+URI. We will show example of both cases, starting with the former.
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cool.end=mock:result
+
+// route
+from("direct:start")
+    .to("properties:{{cool.end}}");
+----
+
+You can also use placeholders as a part of the endpoint URI:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cool.foo=result
+
+// route
+from("direct:start")
+    .to("properties:mock:{{cool.foo}}");
+----
+
+In the example above the to endpoint will be resolved to
+`mock:result`.
+
+You can also have properties with refer to each other such as:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cool.foo=result
+cool.concat=mock:{{cool.foo}}
+
+// route
+from("direct:start")
+    .to("properties:mock:{{cool.concat}}");
+----
+
+Notice how `cool.concat` refer to another property.
+
+The `properties:` component also offers you to override and provide a
+location in the given URI using the `locations` option:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+from("direct:start")
+    .to("properties:bar.end?locations=com/mycompany/bar.properties");
+----
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-Examples]]
+==== Examples
+
+You can also use property placeholders directly in the endpoint URIs
+without having to use `properties:`.
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cool.foo=result
+
+// route
+from("direct:start")
+    .to("mock:{{cool.foo}}");
+----
+
+And you can use them in multiple wherever you want them:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cool.start=direct:start
+cool.showid=true
+cool.result=result
+
+// route
+from("{{cool.start}}")
+    .to("log:{{cool.start}}?showBodyType=false&showExchangeId={{cool.showid}}")
+    .to("mock:{{cool.result}}");
+----
+
+You can also your property placeholders when using
+link:producertemplate.adoc[ProducerTemplate] for example:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+template.sendBody("{{cool.start}}", "Hello World");
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-Examplewithlanguage]]
+==== Example with <<simple-language,Simple>> language
+
+The <<simple-language,Simple>> language now also support using property
+placeholders, for example in the route below:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// properties
+cheese.quote=Camel rocks
+
+// route from("direct:start")
+    .transform().simple("Hi ${body} do you think ${properties:cheese.quote}?");
+----
+
+You can also specify the location in the <<simple-language,Simple>>
+language for example:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+// bar.properties
+bar.quote=Beer tastes good
+
+// route
+from("direct:start")
+    .transform().simple("Hi ${body}. ${properties:com/mycompany/bar.properties:bar.quote}.");
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-AdditionalPropertyPlaceholderSupportinSpringXML]]
+==== Additional Property Placeholder Support in Spring XML
+
+The property placeholders is also supported in many of the Camel Spring
+XML tags such as
+`<package>`, `<packageScan>`, `<contextScan>`, `<jmxAgent>`, `<endpoint>`, `<routeBuilder>`, `<proxy>`
+and the others.
+
+Example using property placeholders in the `<jmxAgent>` tag:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring">
+    <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="org/apache/camel/spring/jmx.properties"/>
+    <!-- we can use propery placeholders when we define the JMX agent -->
+    <jmxAgent id="agent" registryPort="{{myjmx.port}}" disabled="{{myjmx.disabled}}"
+              usePlatformMBeanServer="{{myjmx.usePlatform}}" createConnector="true"
+              statisticsLevel="RoutesOnly" useHostIPAddress="true"/>
+    <route id="foo" autoStartup="false">
+        <from uri="seda:start"/>
+        <to uri="mock:result"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+
+Example using property placeholders in the attributes of `<camelContext>`:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext trace="{{foo.trace}}" xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring">
+    <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="org/apache/camel/spring/processor/myprop.properties"/>
+    <template id="camelTemplate" defaultEndpoint="{{foo.cool}}"/>
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <setHeader headerName="{{foo.header}}">
+            <simple>${in.body} World!</simple>
+        </setHeader>
+        <to uri="mock:result"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-OverridingaPropertySettingUsingaJVMSystemProperty]]
+==== Overriding a Property Setting Using a JVM System Property
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.5*
+
+It is possible to override a property value at runtime using a JVM
+System property without the need to restart the application to pick up
+the change. This may also be accomplished from the command line by
+creating a JVM System property of the same name as the property it
+replaces with a new value.
+
+Example:
+
+
+[source,java]
+----
+PropertiesComponent pc = context.getComponent("properties", PropertiesComponent.class);
+pc.setCache(false);
+System.setProperty("cool.end", "mock:override");
+System.setProperty("cool.result", "override");
+context.addRoutes(new RouteBuilder() {
+    @Override
+    public void configure() throws Exception {
+        from("direct:start").to("properties:cool.end");
+        from("direct:foo").to("properties:mock:{{cool.result}}");
+    }
+});
+context.start();
+getMockEndpoint("mock:override").expectedMessageCount(2);
+template.sendBody("direct:start", "Hello World");
+template.sendBody("direct:foo", "Hello Foo");
+System.clearProperty("cool.end");
+System.clearProperty("cool.result");
+assertMockEndpointsSatisfied();
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingPropertyPlaceholdersforAnyKindofAttributeintheXMLDSL]]
+==== Using Property Placeholders for Any Kind of Attribute in the XML DSL
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.7*
+
+If you use OSGi Blueprint then this only works from *2.11.1* or *2.10.5*
+on.
+
+Previously it was only the `xs:string` type attributes in the XML DSL
+that support placeholders. For example often a timeout attribute would
+be a `xs:int` type and thus you cannot set a string value as the
+placeholder key. This is now possible from Camel 2.7 on using a special
+placeholder namespace.
+
+In the example below we use the `prop` prefix for the namespace
+`http://camel.apache.org/schema/placeholder` by which we can use the
+`prop` prefix in the attributes in the XML DSLs. Notice how we use
+that in the link:multicast.adoc[Multicast] to indicate that the option
+`stopOnException` should be the value of the placeholder with the key
+`stop`.
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
+       xmlns:prop="http://camel.apache.org/schema/placeholder"
+       xsi:schemaLocation="
+           http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
+           http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring/camel-spring.xsd">
+    <!-- Notice in the declaration above, we have defined the prop prefix as the Camel placeholder namespace -->
+    <bean id="damn" class="java.lang.IllegalArgumentException">
+        <constructor-arg index="0" value="Damn"/>
+    </bean>
+    <camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring">
+        <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="classpath:org/apache/camel/component/properties/myprop.properties"
+                             xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring"/>
+        <route>
+            <from uri="direct:start"/>
+            <!-- use prop namespace, to define a property placeholder, which maps to option stopOnException={{stop}} -->
+            <multicast prop:stopOnException="stop">
+            <to uri="mock:a"/>
+            <throwException ref="damn"/>
+            <to uri="mock:b"/>
+            </multicast>
+        </route>
+    </camelContext>
+</beans>
+----
+
+In our properties file we have the value defined as:
+....
+stop=true
+....
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingPropertyPlaceholderintheJavaDSL]]
+==== Using Property Placeholder in the Java DSL
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.7*
+
+Likewise we have added support for defining placeholders in the Java DSL
+using the new `placeholder` DSL as shown in the following equivalent
+example:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+from("direct:start")
+    // use a property placeholder for the option stopOnException on the Multicast EIP
+    // which should have the value of {{stop}} key being looked up in the properties file
+    .multicast()
+    .placeholder("stopOnException", "stop")
+    .to("mock:a")
+    .throwException(new IllegalAccessException("Damn"))
+    .to("mock:b");
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingBlueprintPropertyPlaceholderwithCamelRoutes]]
+==== Using Blueprint Property Placeholder with Camel Routes
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.7*
+
+Camel supports link:using-osgi-blueprint-with-camel.adoc[Blueprint]
+which also offers a property placeholder service. Camel supports
+convention over configuration, so all you have to do is to define the
+OSGi Blueprint property placeholder in the XML file as shown below:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<blueprint xmlns="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0"
+           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
+           xmlns:cm="http://aries.apache.org/blueprint/xmlns/blueprint-cm/v1.0.0"
+           xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0 https://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0/blueprint.xsd">
+    <!-- OSGI blueprint property placeholder -->
+    <cm:property-placeholder id="myblueprint.placeholder" persistent-id="camel.blueprint">
+        <!-- list some properties as needed -->
+        <cm:default-properties>
+            <cm:property name="result" value="mock:result"/>
+        </cm:default-properties>
+    </cm:property-placeholder>
+    <camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+        <!-- in the route we can use {{ }} placeholders which will lookup in blueprint as Camel
+             will auto detect the OSGi blueprint property placeholder and use it -->
+        <route>
+            <from uri="direct:start"/>
+            <to uri="mock:foo"/>
+            <to uri="{{result}}"/>
+        </route>
+    </camelContext>
+</blueprint>
+----
+
+By default Camel detects and uses OSGi blueprint property placeholder
+service. You can disable this by setting the attribute
+`useBlueprintPropertyResolver` to false on the `<camelContext>`
+definition.
+
+===== About placeholder syntaxes
+
+Notice how we can use the Camel syntax for placeholders `{{ }}` in the
+Camel route, which will lookup the value from OSGi blueprint.
+The blueprint syntax for placeholders is `${}`. So outside
+the `<camelContext>` you must use the `${}` syntax. Where as
+inside `<camelContext>` you must use `{{ }}` syntax. OSGi blueprint
+allows you to configure the syntax, so you can actually align those if
+you want.
+
+You can also explicit refer to a specific OSGi blueprint property
+placeholder by its id. For that you need to use the
+Camel's `<propertyPlaceholder>` as shown in the example below:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<blueprint xmlns="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0"
+           xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
+           xmlns:cm="http://aries.apache.org/blueprint/xmlns/blueprint-cm/v1.0.0"
+           xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0 https://www.osgi.org/xmlns/blueprint/v1.0.0/blueprint.xsd">
+    <!-- OSGI blueprint property placeholder -->
+    <cm:property-placeholder id="myblueprint.placeholder" persistent-id="camel.blueprint">
+        <!-- list some properties as needed -->
+        <cm:default-properties>
+            <cm:property name="prefix.result" value="mock:result"/>
+        </cm:default-properties>
+    </cm:property-placeholder>
+    <camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+        <!-- using Camel properties component and refer to the blueprint property placeholder by its id -->
+        <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="blueprint:myblueprint.placeholder"
+                             prefixToken="[[" suffixToken="]]" propertyPrefix="prefix."/>
+        <!-- in the route we can use {{ }} placeholders which will lookup in blueprint -->
+        <route>
+            <from uri="direct:start"/>
+            <to uri="mock:foo"/>
+            <to uri="[[result]]"/>
+        </route>
+    </camelContext>
+</blueprint>
+----
+
+Notice how we use the `blueprint` scheme to refer to the OSGi
+blueprint placeholder by its id. This allows you to mix and match, for
+example you can also have additional schemes in the location. For
+example to load a file from the classpath you can do:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+location="blueprint:myblueprint.placeholder,classpath:myproperties.properties"
+----
+
+Each location is separated by comma.
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-OverridingBlueprintPropertyPlaceholdersOutsideCamelContext]]
+==== Overriding Blueprint Property Placeholders Outside CamelContext
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.10.4*
+
+When using Blueprint property placeholder in the Blueprint XML file, you
+can declare the properties directly in the XML file as shown below:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/configadmin-outside.xml[]
+
+Notice that we have a `<bean>` which refers to one of the properties. And in
+the Camel route we refer to the other using the `{{ }}` notation.
+
+Now if you want to override these Blueprint properties from an unit
+test, you can do this as shown below:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/ConfigAdminOverridePropertiesOutsideCamelContextTest.java[]
+
+To do this we override and implement the
+`useOverridePropertiesWithConfigAdmin` method. We can then put the
+properties we want to override on the given props parameter. And the
+return value _must_ be the persistence-id of
+the `<cm:property-placeholder>` tag, which you define in the blueprint
+XML file.
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-Usinga.cfgor.propertiesFileForBlueprintPropertyPlaceholders]]
+==== Using a `.cfg` or `.properties` File For Blueprint Property Placeholders
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.10.4*
+
+When using Blueprint property placeholder in the Blueprint XML file, you
+can declare the properties in a .properties or `.cfg` file. If you use
+Apache ServiceMix/Karaf then this container has a convention that it
+loads the properties from a file in the etc directory with the naming
+`etc/pid.cfg`, where `pid` is the persistence-id.
+
+For example in the blueprint XML file we have the
+`persistence-id="stuff"`, which mean it will load the configuration
+file as `etc/stuff.cfg`.
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/configadmin-loadfile.xml[]
+
+Now if you want to unit test this blueprint XML file, then you can override
+the `loadConfigAdminConfigurationFile` and tell Camel which file to
+load as shown below:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/ConfigAdminLoadConfigurationFileTest.java[]
+
+Notice that this method requires to return a `String[]` with 2 values. The
+1st value is the path for the configuration file to load. The second
+value is the persistence-id of the `<cm:property-placeholder>` tag.
+
+The `stuff.cfg` file is just a plain properties file with the property
+placeholders such as:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+## this is a comment
+greeting=Bye
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-Usinga.cfgfileandOverridingPropertiesforBlueprintPropertyPlaceholders]]
+==== Using a `.cfg` file and Overriding Properties for Blueprint Property Placeholders
+
+You can do both as well. Here is a complete example. First we have the
+Blueprint XML file:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/configadmin-loadfileoverride.xml[]
+
+And in the unit test class we do as follows:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/ConfigAdminLoadConfigurationFileAndOverrideTest.java[]
+
+And the `etc/stuff.cfg` configuration file contains:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+greeting=Bye
+echo=Yay
+destination=mock:result
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-BridgingSpringandCamelPropertyPlaceholders]]
+==== Bridging Spring and Camel Property Placeholders
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.10*
+
+The Spring Framework does not allow third-party frameworks such as
+Apache Camel to seamless hook into the Spring property placeholder
+mechanism. However you can easily bridge Spring and Camel by declaring a
+Spring bean with the type
+`org.apache.camel.spring.spi.BridgePropertyPlaceholderConfigurer`,
+which is a Spring
+`org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer`
+type.
+
+To bridge Spring and Camel you must define a single bean as shown below:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-spring/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/component/properties/CamelSpringPropertyPlaceholderConfigurerTest.xml[]
+
+You *must not* use the spring `<context:property-placeholder>` namespace
+at the same time; this is not possible.
+
+After declaring this bean, you can define property placeholders using
+both the Spring style, and the Camel style within the `<camelContext>`
+tag as shown below:
+
+include::../../../components/camel-spring/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/component/properties/CamelSpringPropertyPlaceholderConfigurerTest.xml[]
+
+Notice how the hello bean is using pure Spring property placeholders using
+the `${}` notation. And in the Camel routes we use the Camel
+placeholder notation with `{{ }}`.
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-ClashingSpringPropertyPlaceholderswithCamelsLanguage]]
+==== Clashing Spring Property Placeholders with Camels <<simple-language,Simple>> Language
+
+Take notice when using Spring bridging placeholder then the
+spring `${}` syntax clashes with the <<simple-language,Simple>> in
+Camel, and therefore take care.
+
+Example:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<setHeader headerName="Exchange.FILE_NAME">
+    <simple>{{file.rootdir}}/${in.header.CamelFileName}</simple>
+</setHeader>
+----
+
+clashes with Spring property placeholders, and you should
+use `$simple{}` to indicate using the <<simple-language,Simple>>
+language in Camel.
+
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<setHeader headerName="Exchange.FILE_NAME">
+    <simple>{{file.rootdir}}/$simple{in.header.CamelFileName}</simple>
+</setHeader>
+----
+
+An alternative is to configure the `PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer`
+with `ignoreUnresolvablePlaceholders` option to `true`.
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-OverridingPropertiesfromCamelTestKit]]
+==== Overriding Properties from Camel Test Kit
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.10*
+
+When link:testing.adoc[Testing] with Camel and using the
+link:properties.adoc[Properties] component, you may want to be able to
+provide the properties to be used from directly within the unit test
+source code. This is now possible from Camel 2.10, as the Camel test
+kits, e.g., `CamelTestSupport` class offers the following methods
+
+* `useOverridePropertiesWithPropertiesComponent`
+* `ignoreMissingLocationWithPropertiesComponent`
+
+So for example in your unit test classes, you can override the
+`useOverridePropertiesWithPropertiesComponent` method and return a
+`java.util.Properties` that contains the properties which should be
+preferred to be used.
+
+include::../../../components/camel-test-blueprint/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/blueprint/ConfigAdminOverridePropertiesTest.java[]
+
+This can be done from any of the Camel Test kits, such as `camel-test`,
+`camel-test-spring` and `camel-test-blueprint`.
+
+The `ignoreMissingLocationWithPropertiesComponent` can be used to
+instruct Camel to ignore any locations which was not discoverable. For
+example if you run the unit test, in an environment that does not have
+access to the location of the properties.
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingPropertyInject]]
+==== Using `@PropertyInject`
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.12*
+
+Camel allows to inject property placeholders in POJOs using
+the `@PropertyInject` annotation which can be set on fields and setter
+methods. For example you can use that with `RouteBuilder` classes,
+such as shown below:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+public class MyRouteBuilder extends RouteBuilder {
+
+    @PropertyInject("hello")
+    private String greeting;
+
+    @Override
+    public void configure() throws Exception {
+        from("direct:start")
+            .transform().constant(greeting)
+            .to("{{result}}");
+    }
+}
+----
+
+Notice we have annotated the greeting field with `@PropertyInject` and
+define it to use the key `hello`. Camel will then lookup the property
+with this key and inject its value, converted to a String type.
+
+You can also use multiple placeholders and text in the key, for example
+we can do:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+@PropertyInject("Hello {{name}} how are you?")
+private String greeting;
+----
+
+This will lookup the placeholder with they key `name`.
+
+You can also add a default value if the key does not exists, such as:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+@PropertyInject(value = "myTimeout", defaultValue = "5000")
+private int timeout;
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingOutoftheBoxFunctions]]
+==== Using Out of the Box Functions
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.14.1*
+
+The link:properties.adoc[Properties] component includes the following
+functions out of the box
+
+* `env` - A function to lookup the property from OS environment
+variables.
+* `sys` - A function to lookup the property from Java JVM system
+properties.
+* `service` - A function to lookup the property from OS environment
+variables using the service naming idiom.
+* `service.host` - **Camel 2.16.1: **A function to lookup the
+property from OS environment variables using the service naming idiom
+returning the hostname part only.
+* `service.port` - **Camel 2.16.1: **A function to lookup the
+property from OS environment variables using the service naming idiom
+returning the port part only.
+
+As you can see these functions is intended to make it easy to lookup
+values from the environment. As they are provided out of the box, they
+can easily be used as shown below:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <to uri="{{env:SOMENAME}}"/>
+        <to uri="{{sys:MyJvmPropertyName}}"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+You can use default values as well, so if the property does not exists,
+you can define a default value as shown below, where the default value
+is a `log:foo` and `log:bar` value.
+
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <to uri="{{env:SOMENAME:log:foo}}"/>
+        <to uri="{{sys:MyJvmPropertyName:log:bar}}"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+The service function is for looking up a service which is defined using
+OS environment variables using the service naming idiom, to refer to a
+service location using `hostname : port`
+
+* __NAME___SERVICE_HOST
+* __NAME___SERVICE_PORT
+
+in other words the service uses `_SERVICE_HOST` and `_SERVICE_PORT`
+as prefix. So if the service is named `FOO`, then the OS environment
+variables should be set as
+
+export $FOO_SERVICE_HOST=myserver export $FOO_SERVICE_PORT=8888
+
+For example if the `FOO` service a remote HTTP service, then we can
+refer to the service in the Camel endpoint URI, and use
+the link:http.adoc[HTTP] component to make the HTTP call:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <to uri="http://{{service:FOO}}/myapp"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+And we can use default values if the service has not been defined, for
+example to call a service on localhost, maybe for unit testing etc:
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <to uri="http://{{service:FOO:localhost:8080}}/myapp"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-UsingCustomFunctions]]
+==== Using Custom Functions
+
+*Available as of Camel 2.14.1*
+
+The link:properties.adoc[Properties] component allow to plugin 3rd party
+functions which can be used during parsing of the property placeholders.
+These functions are then able to do custom logic to resolve the
+placeholders, such as looking up in databases, do custom computations,
+or whatnot. The name of the function becomes the prefix used in the
+placeholder. This is best illustrated in the example code below
+
+[source,xml]
+----
+<bean id="beerFunction" class="MyBeerFunction"/>
+<camelContext xmlns="http://camel.apache.org/schema/blueprint">
+    <propertyPlaceholder id="properties" location="none" ignoreMissingLocation="true">
+        <propertiesFunction ref="beerFunction"/>
+    </propertyPlaceholder>
+    <route>
+        <from uri="direct:start"/>
+        <to uri="{{beer:FOO}}"/>
+        <to uri="{{beer:BAR}}"/>
+    </route>
+</camelContext>
+----
+
+Here we have a Camel XML route where we have defined
+the `<propertyPlaceholder>` to use a custom function, which we refer
+to be the bean id - e.g., the `beerFunction`. As the beer function
+uses `beer` as its name, then the placeholder syntax can trigger the
+beer function by starting with `beer:value`.
+
+The implementation of the function is only two methods as shown below:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+public static final class MyBeerFunction implements PropertiesFunction {
+    @Override
+    public String getName() {
+        return "beer";
+    }
+    @Override
+    public String apply(String remainder) {
+        return "mock:" + remainder.toLowerCase();
+    }
+}
+----
+
+The function must implement
+the `org.apache.camel.component.properties.PropertiesFunction`
+interface. The method `getName` is  the name of the function, e.g.,
+`beer`. And the `apply` method is where we implement the custom
+logic to do. As the sample code is from an unit test, it just returns a
+value to refer to a mock endpoint.
+
+To register a custom function from Java code is as shown below:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+PropertiesComponent pc = context.getComponent("properties", PropertiesComponent.class);
+pc.addFunction(new MyBeerFunction());
+----
+
+
+[[UsingPropertyPlaceholder-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* <<properties-component,Properties>> component
diff --git a/docs/user-manual/en/writing-components.adoc b/docs/user-manual/en/writing-components.adoc
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5d937c1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/docs/user-manual/en/writing-components.adoc
@@ -0,0 +1,158 @@
+[[WritingComponents-WritingComponents]]
+=== Writing Components
+
+Apache Camel is designed to make it very easy to drop in new components
+whether they be routing components, transformers, transports etc. The
+idea of a component is to be a factory and manager of
+link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoints].
+
+Here are the main steps to writing a component:
+
+* Write a POJO which implements the
+http://activemq.apache.org/camel/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Component.html[Component]
+interface. The simplest approach is just to derive from
+http://activemq.apache.org/camel/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/impl/DefaultComponent.html[DefaultComponent].
+* To support auto-discovery of your component add a file to
+`META-INF/services/org/apache/camel/component/FOO` where FOO is the URI
+scheme for your component and any related endpoints created on the fly.
+The latter file should contain the definition of the component class.
+For example if your component is implemented by the
+`com.example.CustomComponent` class, the service file should contain the
+following line -- `class=com.example.CustomComponent`.
+
+Users can then either explicitly create your component, configure it and
+register with a
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/CamelContext.html[CamelContext]
+or users can use a URI which auto-creates your component.
+
+[[WritingComponents-WritingEndpoints]]
+==== Writing Endpoints
+
+When implementing an link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint] you typically may
+implement one or more of the following methods:
+
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createProducer()[createProducer()]
+will create a
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Producer.html[Producer]
+for sending message exchanges to the endpoint
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createConsumer(org.apache.camel.Processor)[createConsumer()]
+implements the link:event-driven-consumer.adoc[Event Driven Consumer]
+pattern for consuming message exchanges from the endpoint via a
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Processor.html[Processor]
+when creating a
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Consumer.html[Consumer]
+* http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createPollingConsumer()[createPollingConsumer()]
+implements the link:polling-consumer.adoc[Polling Consumer] pattern for
+consuming message exchanges from the endpoint via a
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/PollingConsumer.html[PollingConsumer]
+
+Typically you just derive from
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/impl/DefaultEndpoint.html[DefaultEndpoint]
+and implement the
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createProducer()[createProducer()]
+and / or
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createConsumer(org.apache.camel.Processor)[createConsumer()]
+methods. The
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createPollingConsumer()[createPollingConsumer()]
+method will be created by default for you in the
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/impl/DefaultEndpoint.html[DefaultEndpoint]
+class.
+
+If your endpoint is a polling-centric component you can derive from
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/impl/DefaultPollingEndpoint.html[DefaultPollingEndpoint]
+and then implement
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createPollingConsumer()[createPollingConsumer()];
+the
+http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/Endpoint.html#createConsumer(org.apache.camel.Processor)[createConsumer()]
+method will be created for you which avoids you having to write any
+polling code.
+
+[[WritingComponents-AnnotatingyourEndpoint]]
+==== Annotating your Endpoint
+
+As of *Camel 2.12* if you want to benefit from the automatic generation
+of HTML documentation for all the parameters on your endpoint as part of
+the maven site reports, you need to
+link:endpoint-annotations.adoc[annotate your Endpoint's parameters].
+
+So this means you add a `@UriEndpoint` annotation to your Endpoint class
+and then annotate each parameter you wish to be configured via the URI
+configuration mechanism with `@UriParam` (or `@UriParams` for nested
+configuration objects).
+
+In addition its recommended that your Component implementation inherit
+from the UriEndpointComponent base class as that means your Component
+will automatically generate better metadata for the
+link:componentconfiguration.adoc[ComponentConfiguration] API.
+
+Refer to the link:endpoint-annotations.adoc[Endpoint Annotations guide
+for details].
+
+[[WritingComponents-UsingaProcessor]]
+==== Using a Processor
+
+If you are writing a simple endpoint which just processes messages in
+some way, you can just implement a link:processor.adoc[Processor] and
+link:processor.adoc[use that to create an endpoint].
+
+[[WritingComponents-Dependencyinjectionandauto-discovery]]
+==== Dependency injection and auto-discovery
+
+When using auto-discovery the CamelContext will default to its
+link:injector.adoc[Injector] implementation to inject any required or
+optional dependencies on the component. This allows you to use
+auto-discovery of components via link:uris.adoc[URIs] while still
+getting the benefits of dependency injection.
+
+For example your component can depend on a JDBC DataSource or JMS
+ConnectionFactory which can be provided in the ApplicationContext in
+Spring or Module in Guice.
+
+So you can if you prefer configure your Component using an IoC framework
+like Spring or Guice; then add it to the CamelContext. Or you can let
+the Component auto-inject itself as the endpoints are auto-discovered.
+
+[[WritingComponents-Options]]
+==== Options
+
+If your component has options you can let it have public getters/setters
+and Camel will automatically set the properties when the endpoint is
+created. If you however want to take the matter in your own hands, then
+you must remove the option from the given parameter list as Camel will
+validate that all options are used. If not Camel will throw a
+ResolveEndpointFailedException stating some of the options are unknown.
+
+The parameters is provided by Camel in the createEndpoint method from
+DefaultComponent:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+protected abstract Endpoint<E> createEndpoint(String uri, String remaining, Map parameters)
+----
+
+The code is an example from the <<seda-component,SEDA>> component that removes the size
+parameter:
+
+[source,java]
+----
+    public BlockingQueue<Exchange> createQueue(String uri, Map parameters) {
+        int size = 1000;
+        Object value = parameters.remove("size");
+        if (value != null) {
+            Integer i = convertTo(Integer.class, value);
+            if (i != null) {
+                size = i;
+            }
+        }
+        return new LinkedBlockingQueue<Exchange>(size);
+    }
+----
+
+[[WritingComponents-SeeAlso]]
+==== See Also
+
+* link:configuring-camel.adoc[Configuring Camel]
+* link:endpoint.adoc[Endpoint]
+* link:component.adoc[Component]
+* http://camel.apache.org/creating-a-new-camel-component.html[Creating a
+new Camel Component with Maven]


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