camel-commits mailing list archives

Site index · List index
Message view « Date » · « Thread »
Top « Date » · « Thread »
From build...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1017260 [8/40] - in /websites/production/camel/content: ./ cache/
Date Fri, 25 Aug 2017 08:22:03 GMT
Modified: websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html (original)
+++ websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html Fri Aug 25 08:22:01 2017
@@ -39,7 +39,6 @@
   <link href='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/styles/shCoreCamel.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
   <link href='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/styles/shThemeCamel.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
   <script src='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/scripts/shCore.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
-  <script src='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/scripts/shBrushSql.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
   <script src='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/scripts/shBrushJava.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
   <script src='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/scripts/shBrushXml.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
   <script src='//camel.apache.org/styles/highlighter/scripts/shBrushPlain.js' type='text/javascript'></script>
@@ -110,38 +109,8 @@ Apache Camel &#8482; is a versatile open
 
 <p>To start using Apache Camel quickly, you can read through some simple examples in this chapter. For readers who would like a more thorough introduction, please skip ahead to Chapter 3.</p>
 
-<h2 id="BookInOnePage-WalkthroughanExampleCode">Walk through an Example Code</h2><p>This mini-guide takes you through the source code of a <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java">simple example</a>.</p><p>Camel can be configured either by using <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> or directly in Java - which <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java">this example does</a>.</p><p>This example is available in the <code>examples\camel-example-jms-file</code> directory of the <a shape="rect" href="download.html">Camel distribution</a>.</p><p>We start with creating a <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a> - which is a container for <a shape="rect" href=
 "components.html">Components</a>, <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Routes</a> etc:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-CamelContext context = new DefaultCamelContext();
-]]></script>
-</div></div>There is more than one way of adding a Component to the CamelContext. You can add components implicitly - when we set up the routing - as we do here for the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a>:<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-context.addRoutes(new RouteBuilder() {
-    public void configure() {
-        from(&quot;test-jms:queue:test.queue&quot;).to(&quot;file://test&quot;);
-    }
-});
-]]></script>
-</div></div>or explicitly - as we do here when we add the JMS Component:<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-ConnectionFactory connectionFactory = new ActiveMQConnectionFactory(&quot;vm://localhost?broker.persistent=false&quot;);
-// Note we can explicit name the component
-context.addComponent(&quot;test-jms&quot;, JmsComponent.jmsComponentAutoAcknowledge(connectionFactory));
-]]></script>
-</div></div>The above works with any JMS provider. If we know we are using <a shape="rect" href="activemq.html">ActiveMQ</a> we can use an even simpler form using the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://activemq.apache.org/maven/5.5.0/activemq-camel/apidocs/org/apache/activemq/camel/component/ActiveMQComponent.html#activeMQComponent%28java.lang.String%29"><code>activeMQComponent()</code> method</a> while specifying the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://activemq.apache.org/configuring-transports.html">brokerURL</a> used to connect to ActiveMQ<p>In normal use, an external system would be firing messages or events directly into Camel through one if its <a shape="rect" href="components.html">Components</a> but we are going to use the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/ProducerTemplate.html">ProducerTemplate</a> which is a really easy way for testing your configuration:</p><
 div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-ProducerTemplate template = context.createProducerTemplate();
-]]></script>
-</div></div>Next you <strong>must</strong> start the camel context. If you are using <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> to configure the camel context this is automatically done for you; though if you are using a pure Java approach then you just need to call the start() method<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[camelContext.start();
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>This will start all of the configured routing rules.</p><p>So after starting the <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a>, we can fire some objects into camel:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-for (int i = 0; i &lt; 10; i++) {
-    template.sendBody(&quot;test-jms:queue:test.queue&quot;, &quot;Test Message: &quot; + i);
-}
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h2 id="BookInOnePage-Whathappens?">What happens?</h2><p>From the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/ProducerTemplate.html">ProducerTemplate</a> - we send objects (in this case text) into the <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a> to the Component <em>test-jms:queue:test.queue</em>. These text objects will be <a shape="rect" href="type-converter.html">converted automatically</a> into JMS Messages and posted to a JMS Queue named <em>test.queue</em>. When we set up the <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Route</a>, we configured the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> to listen off the <em>test.queue</em>.</p><p>The File <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> will take messages off the Queue, and save them to a directory named <em>test</em>. Every message will be saved in a file that corresponds to its destination and message id.</p><p>Finally, 
 we configured our own listener in the <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Route</a> - to take notifications from the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> and print them out as text.</p><p><strong>That's it!</strong></p><p>If you have the time then use 5 more minutes to <a shape="rect" href="walk-through-another-example.html">Walk through another example</a> that demonstrates the Spring DSL (XML based) routing.</p>
+<h2 id="BookInOnePage-WalkthroughanExampleCode">Walk through an Example Code</h2><p>This mini-guide takes you through the source code of a <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java">simple example</a>.</p><p>Camel can be configured either by using <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> or directly in Java - which <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java">this example does</a>.</p><p>This example is available in the <code>examples\camel-example-jms-file</code> directory of the <a shape="rect" href="download.html">Camel distribution</a>.</p><p>We start with creating a <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a> - which is a container for <a shape="rect" href=
 "components.html">Components</a>, <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Routes</a> etc:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java}</plain-text-body>There is more than one way of adding a Component to the CamelContext. You can add components implicitly - when we set up the routing - as we do here for the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a>:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e3|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java}</plain-text-body>or explicitly - as we do here when we add the JMS Component:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e2|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java}</plain-text-body>The above works with any JMS provider. If we know we are using <a shape="rect" href="activem
 q.html">ActiveMQ</a> we can use an even simpler form using the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://activemq.apache.org/maven/5.5.0/activemq-camel/apidocs/org/apache/activemq/camel/component/ActiveMQComponent.html#activeMQComponent%28java.lang.String%29"><code>activeMQComponent()</code> method</a> while specifying the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://activemq.apache.org/configuring-transports.html">brokerURL</a> used to connect to ActiveMQ</p><p>In normal use, an external system would be firing messages or events directly into Camel through one if its <a shape="rect" href="components.html">Components</a> but we are going to use the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/ProducerTemplate.html">ProducerTemplate</a> which is a really easy way for testing your configuration:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e4|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/o
 rg/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java}</plain-text-body>Next you <strong>must</strong> start the camel context. If you are using <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> to configure the camel context this is automatically done for you; though if you are using a pure Java approach then you just need to call the start() method</p><plain-text-body>camelContext.start();
+</plain-text-body><p>This will start all of the configured routing rules.</p><p>So after starting the <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a>, we can fire some objects into camel:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e5|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/examples/camel-example-jms-file/src/main/java/org/apache/camel/example/jmstofile/CamelJmsToFileExample.java}</plain-text-body></p><h2 id="BookInOnePage-Whathappens?">What happens?</h2><p>From the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/ProducerTemplate.html">ProducerTemplate</a> - we send objects (in this case text) into the <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a> to the Component <em>test-jms:queue:test.queue</em>. These text objects will be <a shape="rect" href="type-converter.html">converted automatically</a> into JMS Messages and posted to a JMS Queue named <em>test.queue</em>. When we set up the <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Rou
 te</a>, we configured the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> to listen off the <em>test.queue</em>.</p><p>The File <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> will take messages off the Queue, and save them to a directory named <em>test</em>. Every message will be saved in a file that corresponds to its destination and message id.</p><p>Finally, we configured our own listener in the <a shape="rect" href="routes.html">Route</a> - to take notifications from the <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">FileComponent</a> and print them out as text.</p><p><strong>That's it!</strong></p><p>If you have the time then use 5 more minutes to <a shape="rect" href="walk-through-another-example.html">Walk through another example</a> that demonstrates the Spring DSL (XML based) routing.</p>
 <h2 id="BookInOnePage-Walkthroughanotherexample">Walk through another example</h2>
 
 <h3 id="BookInOnePage-Introduction.1">Introduction</h3>
@@ -1301,148 +1270,47 @@ public class MySimpleIdGenerator {
 </div></div>
 
 <p>Groovy supports GStrings that is like a template where we can insert $ placeholders that will be evaluated by Groovy.</p>
-<h2 id="BookInOnePage-BeanBinding">Bean Binding</h2><p>Bean Binding in Camel defines both which methods are invoked and also how the <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a> is converted into the parameters of the method when it is invoked.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Choosingthemethodtoinvoke">Choosing the method to invoke</h3><p>The binding of a Camel <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a> to a bean method call can occur in different ways, in the following order of importance:</p><ul><li>if the message contains the header <strong>CamelBeanMethodName</strong> then that method is invoked, converting the body to the type of the method's argument.<ul><li>From <strong>Camel 2.8</strong> onwards you can qualify parameter types to select exactly which method to use among overloads with the same name (see below for more details).</li><li>From <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards you can specify parameter values directly in the method option (see below for more details).</li></u
 l></li><li>you can explicitly specify the method name in the <a shape="rect" href="dsl.html">DSL</a> or when using <a shape="rect" href="pojo-consuming.html">POJO Consuming</a> or <a shape="rect" href="pojo-producing.html">POJO Producing</a></li><li>if the bean has a method marked with the <code>@Handler</code> annotation, then that method is selected</li><li>if the bean can be converted to a <a shape="rect" href="processor.html">Processor</a> using the <a shape="rect" href="type-converter.html">Type Converter</a> mechanism, then this is used to process the message. The <a shape="rect" href="activemq.html">ActiveMQ</a> component uses this mechanism to allow any JMS MessageListener to be invoked directly by Camel without having to write any integration glue code. You can use the same mechanism to integrate Camel into any other messaging/remoting frameworks.</li><li>if the body of the message can be converted to a <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/mav
 en/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/bean/BeanInvocation.html">BeanInvocation</a> (the default payload used by the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/bean/ProxyHelper.html">ProxyHelper</a>) component - then that is used to invoke the method and pass its arguments</li><li>otherwise the type of the body is used to find a matching method; an error is thrown if a single method cannot be chosen unambiguously.</li><li>you can also use Exchange as the parameter itself, but then the return type must be void.</li><li>if the bean class is private (or package-private), interface methods will be preferred (from <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards) since Camel can't invoke class methods on such beans</li></ul><p>In cases where Camel cannot choose a method to invoke, an <code>AmbiguousMethodCallException</code> is thrown.</p><p>By default the return value is set on the outbound message 
 body.&#160;</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Asynchronousprocessing">Asynchronous processing</h3><p>From&#160;<strong>Camel 2.18</strong>&#160;onwards you can return a CompletionStage implementation (e.g. a CompletableFuture) to implement asynchronous processing.</p><p>Please be sure to properly complete the CompletionStage with the result or exception, including any timeout handling. Exchange processing would wait for completion and would not impose any timeouts automatically. It's extremely useful to monitor&#160;<a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/spi/InflightRepository.html">Inflight repository</a> for any hanging messages.</p><p>Note that completing with "null" won't set outbody message body to null, but would keep message intact. This is useful to support methods that don't modify exchange and return CompletableFuture&lt;Void&gt;. To set body to null, just add Exchange method parameter and directly modi
 fy exchange messages.</p><p>Examples:</p><p>Simple asynchronous processor, modifying message body.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public CompletableFuture&lt;String&gt; doSomethingAsync(String body)]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Composite processor that do not modify exchange</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public CompletableFuture&lt;Void&gt; doSomethingAsync(String body) {
+<h2 id="BookInOnePage-BeanBinding">Bean Binding</h2><p>Bean Binding in Camel defines both which methods are invoked and also how the <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a> is converted into the parameters of the method when it is invoked.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Choosingthemethodtoinvoke">Choosing the method to invoke</h3><p>The binding of a Camel <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a> to a bean method call can occur in different ways, in the following order of importance:</p><ul><li>if the message contains the header <strong>CamelBeanMethodName</strong> then that method is invoked, converting the body to the type of the method's argument.<ul><li>From <strong>Camel 2.8</strong> onwards you can qualify parameter types to select exactly which method to use among overloads with the same name (see below for more details).</li><li>From <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards you can specify parameter values directly in the method option (see below for more details).</li></u
 l></li><li>you can explicitly specify the method name in the <a shape="rect" href="dsl.html">DSL</a> or when using <a shape="rect" href="pojo-consuming.html">POJO Consuming</a> or <a shape="rect" href="pojo-producing.html">POJO Producing</a></li><li>if the bean has a method marked with the <code>@Handler</code> annotation, then that method is selected</li><li>if the bean can be converted to a <a shape="rect" href="processor.html">Processor</a> using the <a shape="rect" href="type-converter.html">Type Converter</a> mechanism, then this is used to process the message. The <a shape="rect" href="activemq.html">ActiveMQ</a> component uses this mechanism to allow any JMS MessageListener to be invoked directly by Camel without having to write any integration glue code. You can use the same mechanism to integrate Camel into any other messaging/remoting frameworks.</li><li>if the body of the message can be converted to a <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/mav
 en/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/bean/BeanInvocation.html">BeanInvocation</a> (the default payload used by the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/bean/ProxyHelper.html">ProxyHelper</a>) component - then that is used to invoke the method and pass its arguments</li><li>otherwise the type of the body is used to find a matching method; an error is thrown if a single method cannot be chosen unambiguously.</li><li>you can also use Exchange as the parameter itself, but then the return type must be void.</li><li>if the bean class is private (or package-private), interface methods will be preferred (from <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards) since Camel can't invoke class methods on such beans</li></ul><p>In cases where Camel cannot choose a method to invoke, an <code>AmbiguousMethodCallException</code> is thrown.</p><p>By default the return value is set on the outbound message 
 body.&#160;</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Asynchronousprocessing">Asynchronous processing</h3><p>From&#160;<strong>Camel 2.18</strong>&#160;onwards you can return a CompletionStage implementation (e.g. a CompletableFuture) to implement asynchronous processing.</p><p>Please be sure to properly complete the CompletionStage with the result or exception, including any timeout handling. Exchange processing would wait for completion and would not impose any timeouts automatically. It's extremely useful to monitor&#160;<a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/spi/InflightRepository.html">Inflight repository</a> for any hanging messages.</p><p>Note that completing with "null" won't set outbody message body to null, but would keep message intact. This is useful to support methods that don't modify exchange and return CompletableFuture&lt;Void&gt;. To set body to null, just add Exchange method parameter and directly modi
 fy exchange messages.</p><p>Examples:</p><p>Simple asynchronous processor, modifying message body.</p><parameter ac:name="language">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public CompletableFuture&lt;String&gt; doSomethingAsync(String body)</plain-text-body><p>Composite processor that do not modify exchange</p><parameter ac:name="language">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public CompletableFuture&lt;Void&gt; doSomethingAsync(String body) {
 	return CompletableFuture.allOf(doA(body), doB(body), doC());
-}]]></script>
-</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Parameterbinding">Parameter binding</h3><p>When a method has been chosen for invocation, Camel will bind to the parameters of the method.</p><p>The following Camel-specific types are automatically bound:</p><ul class="alternate"><li><code>org.apache.camel.Exchange</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.Message</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.CamelContext</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.TypeConverter</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.spi.Registry</code></li><li><code>java.lang.Exception</code></li></ul><p>So, if you declare any of these types, they will be provided by Camel. <strong>Note that <code>Exception</code> will bind to the caught exception of the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a></strong> - so it's often usable if you employ a <a shape="rect" href="pojo.html">Pojo</a> to handle, e.g., an <code>onException</code> route.</p><p>What is most interesting is that Camel will also try to bind the body of the <a shape="
 rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> to the first parameter of the method signature (albeit not of any of the types above). So if, for instance, we declare a parameter as <code>String body</code>, then Camel will bind the IN body to this type. Camel will also automatically convert to the type declared in the method signature.</p><p>Let's review some examples:</p><p>Below is a simple method with a body binding. Camel will bind the IN body to the <code>body</code> parameter and convert it to a <code>String</code>.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public String doSomething(String body)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>In the following sample we got one of the automatically-bound types as well - for instance, a <code>Registry</code> that we can use to lookup beans.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public String doSomething(String body, Registry registry)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>We can use <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> as well:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public String doSomething(String body, Exchange exchange)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>You can also have multiple types:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public String doSomething(String body, Exchange exchange, TypeConverter converter)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>And imagine you use a <a shape="rect" href="pojo.html">Pojo</a> to handle a given custom exception <code>InvalidOrderException</code> - we can then bind that as well:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public String badOrder(String body, InvalidOrderException invalid)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Notice that we can bind to it even if we use a sub type of <code>java.lang.Exception</code> as Camel still knows it's an exception and can bind the cause (if any exists).</p><p>So what about headers and other stuff? Well now it gets a bit tricky - so we can use annotations to help us, or specify the binding in the method name option.<br clear="none"> See the following sections for more detail.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-BindingAnnotations">Binding Annotations</h3><p>You can use the <a shape="rect" href="parameter-binding-annotations.html">Parameter Binding Annotations</a> to customize how parameter values are created from the <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a></p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Examples">Examples</h4><p>For example, a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> such as:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public class Bar {
+}</plain-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Parameterbinding">Parameter binding</h3><p>When a method has been chosen for invocation, Camel will bind to the parameters of the method.</p><p>The following Camel-specific types are automatically bound:</p><ul class="alternate"><li><code>org.apache.camel.Exchange</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.Message</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.CamelContext</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.TypeConverter</code></li><li><code>org.apache.camel.spi.Registry</code></li><li><code>java.lang.Exception</code></li></ul><p>So, if you declare any of these types, they will be provided by Camel. <strong>Note that <code>Exception</code> will bind to the caught exception of the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a></strong> - so it's often usable if you employ a <a shape="rect" href="pojo.html">Pojo</a> to handle, e.g., an <code>onException</code> route.</p><p>What is most interesting is that Camel will also try to bind the body of the <a 
 shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> to the first parameter of the method signature (albeit not of any of the types above). So if, for instance, we declare a parameter as <code>String body</code>, then Camel will bind the IN body to this type. Camel will also automatically convert to the type declared in the method signature.</p><p>Let's review some examples:</p><p>Below is a simple method with a body binding. Camel will bind the IN body to the <code>body</code> parameter and convert it to a <code>String</code>.</p><plain-text-body>public String doSomething(String body)
+</plain-text-body><p>In the following sample we got one of the automatically-bound types as well - for instance, a <code>Registry</code> that we can use to lookup beans.</p><plain-text-body>public String doSomething(String body, Registry registry)
+</plain-text-body><p>We can use <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> as well:</p><plain-text-body>public String doSomething(String body, Exchange exchange)
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also have multiple types:</p><plain-text-body>public String doSomething(String body, Exchange exchange, TypeConverter converter)
+</plain-text-body><p>And imagine you use a <a shape="rect" href="pojo.html">Pojo</a> to handle a given custom exception <code>InvalidOrderException</code> - we can then bind that as well:</p><plain-text-body>public String badOrder(String body, InvalidOrderException invalid)
+</plain-text-body><p>Notice that we can bind to it even if we use a sub type of <code>java.lang.Exception</code> as Camel still knows it's an exception and can bind the cause (if any exists).</p><p>So what about headers and other stuff? Well now it gets a bit tricky - so we can use annotations to help us, or specify the binding in the method name option.<br clear="none"> See the following sections for more detail.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-BindingAnnotations">Binding Annotations</h3><p>You can use the <a shape="rect" href="parameter-binding-annotations.html">Parameter Binding Annotations</a> to customize how parameter values are created from the <a shape="rect" href="message.html">Message</a></p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Examples">Examples</h4><p>For example, a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> such as:</p><plain-text-body>public class Bar {
 
     public String doSomething(String body) {
       // process the in body and return whatever you want
-      return &quot;Bye World&quot;;
+      return "Bye World";
    }
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Or the Exchange example. Notice that the return type must be <strong>void</strong> when there is only a single parameter of the type <code>org.apache.camel.Exchange</code>:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public class Bar {
+</plain-text-body><p>Or the Exchange example. Notice that the return type must be <strong>void</strong> when there is only a single parameter of the type <code>org.apache.camel.Exchange</code>:</p><plain-text-body>public class Bar {
 
     public void doSomething(Exchange exchange) {
       // process the exchange
-      exchange.getIn().setBody(&quot;Bye World&quot;);
+      exchange.getIn().setBody("Bye World");
    }
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-@Handler">@Handler</h4><p>You can mark a method in your bean with the @Handler annotation to indicate that this method should be used for <a shape="rect" href="bean-binding.html">Bean Binding</a>.<br clear="none"> This has an advantage as you need not specify a method name in the Camel route, and therefore do not run into problems after renaming the method in an IDE that can't find all its references.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public class Bar {
+</plain-text-body><h4 id="BookInOnePage-@Handler">@Handler</h4><p>You can mark a method in your bean with the @Handler annotation to indicate that this method should be used for <a shape="rect" href="bean-binding.html">Bean Binding</a>.<br clear="none"> This has an advantage as you need not specify a method name in the Camel route, and therefore do not run into problems after renaming the method in an IDE that can't find all its references.</p><parameter ac:name="">java</parameter><plain-text-body>public class Bar {
 
     @Handler
     public String doSomething(String body) {
       // process the in body and return whatever you want
-      return &quot;Bye World&quot;;
+      return "Bye World";
    }
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Parameterbindingusingmethodoption">Parameter binding using method option</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.9</strong></p><p>Camel uses the following rules to determine if it's a parameter value in the method option</p><ul class="alternate"><li>The value is either <code>true</code> or <code>false</code> which denotes a boolean value</li><li>The value is a numeric value such as <code>123</code> or <code>7</code></li><li>The value is a String enclosed with either single or double quotes</li><li>The value is null which denotes a <code>null</code> value</li><li>It can be evaluated using the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> language, which means you can use, e.g., body, header.foo and other <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> tokens. Notice the tokens must be enclosed with ${ }.</li></ul><p>Any other value is consider to be a type declaration instead - see the next section about specifying types for overloaded methods.</p><p>Wh
 en invoking a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> you can instruct Camel to invoke a specific method by providing the method name:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Here we tell Camel to invoke the doSomething method - Camel handles the parameters' binding. Now suppose the method has 2 parameters, and the 2nd parameter is a boolean where we want to pass in a true value:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[public void doSomething(String payload, boolean highPriority) {
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Parameterbindingusingmethodoption">Parameter binding using method option</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.9</strong></p><p>Camel uses the following rules to determine if it's a parameter value in the method option</p><ul class="alternate"><li>The value is either <code>true</code> or <code>false</code> which denotes a boolean value</li><li>The value is a numeric value such as <code>123</code> or <code>7</code></li><li>The value is a String enclosed with either single or double quotes</li><li>The value is null which denotes a <code>null</code> value</li><li>It can be evaluated using the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> language, which means you can use, e.g., body, header.foo and other <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> tokens. Notice the tokens must be enclosed with ${ }.</li></ul><p>Any other value is consider to be a type declaration instead - see the next section about specifying types for overloaded methods.</p
 ><p>When invoking a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> you can instruct Camel to invoke a specific method by providing the method name:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething")
+</plain-text-body><p>Here we tell Camel to invoke the doSomething method - Camel handles the parameters' binding. Now suppose the method has 2 parameters, and the 2nd parameter is a boolean where we want to pass in a true value:</p><plain-text-body>public void doSomething(String payload, boolean highPriority) {
    ...
 }
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>This is now possible in <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething(*, true)&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>In the example above, we defined the first parameter using the wild card symbol *, which tells Camel to bind this parameter to any type, and let Camel figure this out. The 2nd parameter has a fixed value of <code>true</code>. Instead of the wildcard symbol we can instruct Camel to use the message body as shown:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething(${body}, true)&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>The syntax of the parameters is using the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> expression language so we have to use ${ } placeholders in the body to refer to the message body.</p><p>If you want to pass in a <code>null</code> value, then you can explicit define this in the method option as shown below:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .to(&quot;bean:orderService?method=doSomething(null, true)&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Specifying <code>null</code> as a parameter value instructs Camel to force passing a <code>null</code> value.</p><p>Besides the message body, you can pass in the message headers as a <code>java.util.Map</code>:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomethingWithHeaders(${body}, ${headers})&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>You can also pass in other fixed values besides booleans. For example, you can pass in a String and an integer:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(MyBean.class, &quot;echo(&#39;World&#39;, 5)&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>In the example above, we invoke the echo method with two parameters. The first has the content 'World' (without quotes), and the 2nd has the value of 5.<br clear="none"> Camel will automatically convert these values to the parameters' types.</p><p>Having the power of the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> language allows us to bind to message headers and other values such as:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething(${body}, ${header.high})&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>You can also use the OGNL support of the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> expression language. Now suppose the message body is an object which has a method named <code>asXml</code>. To invoke the <code>asXml</code> method we can do as follows:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething(${body.asXml}, ${header.high})&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Instead of using <code>.bean</code> as shown in the examples above, you may want to use <code>.to</code> instead as shown:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .to(&quot;bean:orderService?method=doSomething(${body.asXml}, ${header.high})&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Usingtypequalifierstoselectamongoverloadedmethods">Using type qualifiers to select among overloaded methods</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.8</strong></p><p>If you have a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> with overloaded methods, you can now specify parameter types in the method name so Camel can match the method you intend to use.<br clear="none"> Given the following bean:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>MyBean</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-public static final class MyBean {
-
-    public String hello(String name) {
-        return &quot;Hello &quot; + name;
-    }
-
-    public String hello(String name, @Header(&quot;country&quot;) String country) {
-        return &quot;Hello &quot; + name + &quot; you are from &quot; + country;
-    }
-
-    public String times(String name, @Header(&quot;times&quot;) int times) {
-        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
-        for (int i = 0; i &lt; times; i++) {
-            sb.append(name);
-        }
-        return sb.toString();
-    }
-
-    public String times(byte[] data, @Header(&quot;times&quot;) int times) {
-        String s = new String(data);
-        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
-        for (int i = 0; i &lt; times; i++) {
-            sb.append(s);
-            if (i &lt; times - 1) {
-                sb.append(&quot;,&quot;);
-            }
-        }
-        return sb.toString();
-    }
-
-    public String times(String name, int times, char separator) {
-        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
-        for (int i = 0; i &lt; times; i++) {
-            sb.append(name);
-            if (i &lt; times - 1) {
-                sb.append(separator);
-            }
-        }
-        return sb.toString();
-    }
-
-}
-]]></script>
-</div></div>Then the <code>MyBean</code> has 2 overloaded methods with the names <code>hello</code> and <code>times</code>. So if we want to use the method which has 2 parameters we can do as follows in the Camel route:<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Invoke 2 parameter method</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-from(&quot;direct:start&quot;)
-    .bean(MyBean.class, &quot;hello(String,String)&quot;)
-    .to(&quot;mock:result&quot;);
-]]></script>
-</div></div>We can also use a <code>*</code> as wildcard so we can just say we want to execute the method with 2 parameters we do<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Invoke 2 parameter method using wildcard</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-from(&quot;direct:start&quot;)
-    .bean(MyBean.class, &quot;hello(*,*)&quot;)
-    .to(&quot;mock:result&quot;);
-]]></script>
-</div></div>By default Camel will match the type name using the simple name, e.g. any leading package name will be disregarded. However if you want to match using the FQN, then specify the FQN type and Camel will leverage that. So if you have a <code>com.foo.MyOrder</code> and you want to match against the FQN, and <strong>not</strong> the simple name "MyOrder", then follow this example:<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[   .bean(OrderService.class, &quot;doSomething(com.foo.MyOrder)&quot;)
-]]></script>
-</div></div><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>Camel currently only supports either specifying parameter binding or type per parameter in the method name option. You <strong>cannot</strong> specify both at the same time, such as</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[doSomething(com.foo.MyOrder ${body}, boolean ${header.high})
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>This may change in the future.</p></div></div>
+</plain-text-body><p>This is now possible in <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething(*, true)")
+</plain-text-body><p>In the example above, we defined the first parameter using the wild card symbol *, which tells Camel to bind this parameter to any type, and let Camel figure this out. The 2nd parameter has a fixed value of <code>true</code>. Instead of the wildcard symbol we can instruct Camel to use the message body as shown:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething(${body}, true)")
+</plain-text-body><p>The syntax of the parameters is using the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> expression language so we have to use ${ } placeholders in the body to refer to the message body.</p><p>If you want to pass in a <code>null</code> value, then you can explicit define this in the method option as shown below:</p><plain-text-body>   .to("bean:orderService?method=doSomething(null, true)")
+</plain-text-body><p>Specifying <code>null</code> as a parameter value instructs Camel to force passing a <code>null</code> value.</p><p>Besides the message body, you can pass in the message headers as a <code>java.util.Map</code>:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomethingWithHeaders(${body}, ${headers})")
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also pass in other fixed values besides booleans. For example, you can pass in a String and an integer:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(MyBean.class, "echo('World', 5)")
+</plain-text-body><p>In the example above, we invoke the echo method with two parameters. The first has the content 'World' (without quotes), and the 2nd has the value of 5.<br clear="none"> Camel will automatically convert these values to the parameters' types.</p><p>Having the power of the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> language allows us to bind to message headers and other values such as:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething(${body}, ${header.high})")
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also use the OGNL support of the <a shape="rect" href="simple.html">Simple</a> expression language. Now suppose the message body is an object which has a method named <code>asXml</code>. To invoke the <code>asXml</code> method we can do as follows:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething(${body.asXml}, ${header.high})")
+</plain-text-body><p>Instead of using <code>.bean</code> as shown in the examples above, you may want to use <code>.to</code> instead as shown:</p><plain-text-body>   .to("bean:orderService?method=doSomething(${body.asXml}, ${header.high})")
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Usingtypequalifierstoselectamongoverloadedmethods">Using type qualifiers to select among overloaded methods</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.8</strong></p><p>If you have a <a shape="rect" href="bean.html">Bean</a> with overloaded methods, you can now specify parameter types in the method name so Camel can match the method you intend to use.<br clear="none"> Given the following bean:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=java|title=MyBean|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/component/bean/BeanOverloadedMethodTest.java}</plain-text-body>Then the <code>MyBean</code> has 2 overloaded methods with the names <code>hello</code> and <code>times</code>. So if we want to use the method which has 2 parameters we can do as follows in the Camel route:<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e2|lang=java|title=Invoke 2 parameter method|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/component/bean/BeanOverloadedMethodTest.java}</plai
 n-text-body>We can also use a <code>*</code> as wildcard so we can just say we want to execute the method with 2 parameters we do<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e3|lang=java|title=Invoke 2 parameter method using wildcard|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/component/bean/BeanOverloadedMethodTest.java}</plain-text-body>By default Camel will match the type name using the simple name, e.g. any leading package name will be disregarded. However if you want to match using the FQN, then specify the FQN type and Camel will leverage that. So if you have a <code>com.foo.MyOrder</code> and you want to match against the FQN, and <strong>not</strong> the simple name "MyOrder", then follow this example:</p><plain-text-body>   .bean(OrderService.class, "doSomething(com.foo.MyOrder)")
+</plain-text-body><rich-text-body><p>Camel currently only supports either specifying parameter binding or type per parameter in the method name option. You <strong>cannot</strong> specify both at the same time, such as</p><plain-text-body>doSomething(com.foo.MyOrder ${body}, boolean ${header.high})
+</plain-text-body><p>This may change in the future.</p></rich-text-body>
 <h3 id="BookInOnePage-BeanInjection">Bean Injection</h3>
 
 <p>We support the injection of various resources using @EndpointInject or @BeanInject. This can be used to inject</p>
@@ -2079,26 +1947,7 @@ When writing software these days, its im
 
 <p>The following example shows how to perform some time based rules on a simple business process of 2 activities - A and B - which correspond with Purchase Orders and Invoices in the example above. If you would like to experiment with this scenario, you may edit this <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/camel/trunk/components/camel-bam/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/bam/BamRouteTest.java">Test Case</a>, which defines the activities and rules, and then tests that they work.</p>
 
-<div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-return new ProcessBuilder(entityManagerFactory, transactionTemplate) {
-    public void configure() throws Exception {
-
-        // let&#39;s define some activities, correlating on an XPath on the message bodies
-        ActivityBuilder a = activity(&quot;seda:a&quot;).name(&quot;a&quot;)
-                .correlate(xpath(&quot;/hello/@id&quot;));
-
-        ActivityBuilder b = activity(&quot;seda:b&quot;).name(&quot;b&quot;)
-                .correlate(xpath(&quot;/hello/@id&quot;));
-
-        // now let&#39;s add some rules
-        b.starts().after(a.completes())
-                .expectWithin(seconds(1))
-                .errorIfOver(seconds(errorTimeout)).to(&quot;mock:overdue&quot;);
-    }
-};
-]]></script>
-</div></div>
+<plain-text-body>{snippet:id=example|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/components/camel-bam/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/bam/BamRouteTest.java}</plain-text-body>
 
 <p>As you can see in the above example, we first define two activities, and then rules to specify when we expect them to complete for a process instance and when an error condition should be raised.p. The ProcessBuilder is a <a shape="rect" href="routebuilder.html">RouteBuilder</a> and can be added to any <a shape="rect" href="camelcontext.html">CamelContext</a>.  </p>
 
@@ -2116,14 +1965,8 @@ return new ProcessBuilder(entityManagerF
 <p>So you could query data from various Camel <a shape="rect" href="components.html">Components</a> such as <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">File</a>, <a shape="rect" href="http.html">HTTP</a> or <a shape="rect" href="jpa.html">JPA</a>, perform multiple patterns such as <a shape="rect" href="splitter.html">Splitter</a> or <a shape="rect" href="message-translator.html">Message Translator</a> then send the messages to some other <a shape="rect" href="component.html">Component</a>.</p>
 
 <p>To show how this all fits together, try the <a shape="rect" href="etl-example.html">ETL Example</a> </p>
-<h2 id="BookInOnePage-MockComponent">Mock Component</h2><p><a shape="rect" href="testing.html">Testing</a> of distributed and asynchronous processing is notoriously difficult. The <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a>, <a shape="rect" href="test.html">Test</a> and <a shape="rect" href="dataset.html">DataSet</a> endpoints work great with the <a shape="rect" href="testing.html">Camel Testing Framework</a> to simplify your unit and integration testing using <a shape="rect" href="enterprise-integration-patterns.html">Enterprise Integration Patterns</a> and Camel's large range of <a shape="rect" href="components.html">Components</a> together with the powerful <a shape="rect" href="bean-integration.html">Bean Integration</a>.</p><p>The Mock component provides a powerful declarative testing mechanism, which is similar to <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://www.jmock.org" rel="nofollow">jMock</a><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://jmock.org" rel="nofollow">
 </a> in that it allows declarative expectations to be created on any Mock endpoint before a test begins. Then the test is run, which typically fires messages to one or more endpoints, and finally the expectations can be asserted in a test case to ensure the system worked as expected.</p><p>This allows you to test various things like:</p><ul><li>The correct number of messages are received on each endpoint,</li><li>The correct payloads are received, in the right order,</li><li>Messages arrive on an endpoint in order, using some <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to create an order testing function,</li><li>Messages arrive match some kind of <a shape="rect" href="predicate.html">Predicate</a> such as that specific headers have certain values, or that parts of the messages match some predicate, such as by evaluating an <a shape="rect" href="xpath.html">XPath</a> or <a shape="rect" href="xquery.html">XQuery</a> <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a>.</li
 ></ul><p><strong>Note</strong> that there is also the <a shape="rect" href="test.html">Test endpoint</a> which is a Mock endpoint, but which uses a second endpoint to provide the list of expected message bodies and automatically sets up the Mock endpoint assertions. In other words, it's a Mock endpoint that automatically sets up its assertions from some sample messages in a <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">File</a> or <a shape="rect" href="jpa.html">database</a>, for example.</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-warning"><p class="title">Mock endpoints keep received Exchanges in memory indefinitely</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-error confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>Remember that Mock is designed for testing. When you add Mock endpoints to a route, each <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> sent to the endpoint will be stored (to allow for later validati
 on) in memory until explicitly reset or the JVM is restarted. If you are sending high volume and/or large messages, this may cause excessive memory use. If your goal is to test deployable routes inline, consider using <a shape="rect" href="notifybuilder.html">NotifyBuilder</a> or <a shape="rect" href="advicewith.html">AdviceWith</a> in your tests instead of adding Mock endpoints to routes directly.</p><p>From Camel 2.10 onwards there are two new options <code>retainFirst</code>, and <code>retainLast</code> that can be used to limit the number of messages the Mock endpoints keep in memory.</p></div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-URIformat">URI format</h3><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[mock:someName[?options]
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Where <strong>someName</strong> can be any string that uniquely identifies the endpoint.</p><p>You can append query options to the URI in the following format, <code>?option=value&amp;option=value&amp;...</code></p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Options">Options</h3><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Option</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Default</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>reportGroup</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>A size to use a <a shape="rect" href="log.html">throughput logger</a> for reporting</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>retainFirst</code></p></td><td col
 span="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>&#160;</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> To only keep first X number of messages in memory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>retainLast</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>&#160;</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> To only keep last X number of messages in memory.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div>
-
-
-<h3 id="BookInOnePage-SimpleExample.1">Simple Example</h3><p>Here's a simple example of Mock endpoint in use. First, the endpoint is resolved on the context. Then we set an expectation, and then, after the test has run, we assert that our expectations have been met.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[MockEndpoint resultEndpoint = context.resolveEndpoint(&quot;mock:foo&quot;, MockEndpoint.class);
+<h2 id="BookInOnePage-MockComponent">Mock Component</h2><p><parameter ac:name=""><a shape="rect" href="testing-summary-include.html">Testing Summary Include</a></parameter></p><p>The Mock component provides a powerful declarative testing mechanism, which is similar to <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://www.jmock.org" rel="nofollow">jMock</a><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://jmock.org" rel="nofollow"></a> in that it allows declarative expectations to be created on any Mock endpoint before a test begins. Then the test is run, which typically fires messages to one or more endpoints, and finally the expectations can be asserted in a test case to ensure the system worked as expected.</p><p>This allows you to test various things like:</p><ul><li>The correct number of messages are received on each endpoint,</li><li>The correct payloads are received, in the right order,</li><li>Messages arrive on an endpoint in order, using some <a shape="rect" href="express
 ion.html">Expression</a> to create an order testing function,</li><li>Messages arrive match some kind of <a shape="rect" href="predicate.html">Predicate</a> such as that specific headers have certain values, or that parts of the messages match some predicate, such as by evaluating an <a shape="rect" href="xpath.html">XPath</a> or <a shape="rect" href="xquery.html">XQuery</a> <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a>.</li></ul><p><strong>Note</strong> that there is also the <a shape="rect" href="test.html">Test endpoint</a> which is a Mock endpoint, but which uses a second endpoint to provide the list of expected message bodies and automatically sets up the Mock endpoint assertions. In other words, it's a Mock endpoint that automatically sets up its assertions from some sample messages in a <a shape="rect" href="file2.html">File</a> or <a shape="rect" href="jpa.html">database</a>, for example.</p><parameter ac:name="title">Mock endpoints keep received Exchanges in memory 
 indefinitely</parameter><rich-text-body><p>Remember that Mock is designed for testing. When you add Mock endpoints to a route, each <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> sent to the endpoint will be stored (to allow for later validation) in memory until explicitly reset or the JVM is restarted. If you are sending high volume and/or large messages, this may cause excessive memory use. If your goal is to test deployable routes inline, consider using <a shape="rect" href="notifybuilder.html">NotifyBuilder</a> or <a shape="rect" href="advicewith.html">AdviceWith</a> in your tests instead of adding Mock endpoints to routes directly.</p><p>From Camel 2.10 onwards there are two new options <code>retainFirst</code>, and <code>retainLast</code> that can be used to limit the number of messages the Mock endpoints keep in memory.</p></rich-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-URIformat">URI format</h3><plain-text-body>mock:someName[?options]
+</plain-text-body><p>Where <strong>someName</strong> can be any string that uniquely identifies the endpoint.</p><p>You can append query options to the URI in the following format, <code>?option=value&amp;option=value&amp;...</code></p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Options">Options</h3><parameter ac:name="class">confluenceTableSmall</parameter><rich-text-body><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Option</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Default</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>reportGroup</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>A size to use a <a shape="rect" href="log.html">throughput logger</a> for reporting</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluence
 Td"><p><code>retainFirst</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>&#160;</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> To only keep first X number of messages in memory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>retainLast</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>&#160;</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> To only keep last X number of messages in memory.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></rich-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-SimpleExample.1">Simple Example</h3><p>Here's a simple example of Mock endpoint in use. First, the endpoint is resolved on the context. Then we set an expectation, and then, after the test has run, we assert that our expectations have been met.</p><plain-text-body>MockEndpoint resultEndpoint = context.resolveEndpoint("mock:foo", MockEndpoint.class);
 
 resultEndpoint.expectedMessageCount(2);
 
@@ -2132,9 +1975,7 @@ resultEndpoint.expectedMessageCount(2);
 
 // now lets assert that the mock:foo endpoint received 2 messages
 resultEndpoint.assertIsSatisfied();
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>You typically always call the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#assertIsSatisfied()">assertIsSatisfied() method</a> to test that the expectations were met after running a test.</p><p>Camel will by default wait 10 seconds when the <code>assertIsSatisfied()</code> is invoked. This can be configured by setting the <code>setResultWaitTime(millis)</code> method.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-UsingassertPeriod">Using assertPeriod</h4><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.7</strong><br clear="none"> When the assertion is satisfied then Camel will stop waiting and continue from the <code>assertIsSatisfied</code> method. That means if a new message arrives on the mock endpoint, just a bit later, that arrival will not affect the outcome of the assertion. Suppose you do want to test that no new messages arrives after a period thereafter, then you can do that by setting th
 e <code>setAssertPeriod</code> method, for example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[MockEndpoint resultEndpoint = context.resolveEndpoint(&quot;mock:foo&quot;, MockEndpoint.class);
+</plain-text-body><p>You typically always call the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#assertIsSatisfied()">assertIsSatisfied() method</a> to test that the expectations were met after running a test.</p><p>Camel will by default wait 10 seconds when the <code>assertIsSatisfied()</code> is invoked. This can be configured by setting the <code>setResultWaitTime(millis)</code> method.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-UsingassertPeriod">Using assertPeriod</h4><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.7</strong><br clear="none"> When the assertion is satisfied then Camel will stop waiting and continue from the <code>assertIsSatisfied</code> method. That means if a new message arrives on the mock endpoint, just a bit later, that arrival will not affect the outcome of the assertion. Suppose you do want to test that no new messages arrives after a period thereafter, then you can do that by sett
 ing the <code>setAssertPeriod</code> method, for example:</p><plain-text-body>MockEndpoint resultEndpoint = context.resolveEndpoint("mock:foo", MockEndpoint.class);
 resultEndpoint.setAssertPeriod(5000);
 resultEndpoint.expectedMessageCount(2);
 
@@ -2143,1796 +1984,659 @@ resultEndpoint.expectedMessageCount(2);
 
 // now lets assert that the mock:foo endpoint received 2 messages
 resultEndpoint.assertIsSatisfied();
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Settingexpectations">Setting expectations</h3><p>You can see from the javadoc of <a shape="rect" href="httphttp://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html" rel="nofollow">MockEndpoint</a> the various helper methods you can use to set expectations. The main methods are as follows:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Method</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedMessageCount(int)">expectedMessageCount(int)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the expected message count on the endpoint
 .</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedMinimumMessageCount(int)">expectedMinimumMessageCount(int)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the minimum number of expected messages on the endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedBodiesReceived(java.lang.Object...)">expectedBodiesReceived(...)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the expected bodies that should be received (in order).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/cam
 el-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedHeaderReceived(java.lang.String,%20java.lang.String)">expectedHeaderReceived(...)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the expected header that should be received</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectsAscending(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsAscending(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that messages are received in order, using the given <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to compare messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoin
 t.html#expectsDescending(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsDescending(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that messages are received in order, using the given <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to compare messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectsNoDuplicates(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsNoDuplicates(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that no duplicate messages are received; using an <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to calculate a unique identifier for each message. This could be something like the <code>JMSMessageID</code> if using JMS, or some unique reference number within the message.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><
 /div></div>
+</plain-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Settingexpectations">Setting expectations</h3><p>You can see from the javadoc of <a shape="rect" href="httphttp://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html" rel="nofollow">MockEndpoint</a> the various helper methods you can use to set expectations. The main methods are as follows:</p><parameter ac:name="class">confluenceTableSmall</parameter><rich-text-body><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Method</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedMessageCount(int)">expectedMessageCount(int)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To de
 fine the expected message count on the endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedMinimumMessageCount(int)">expectedMinimumMessageCount(int)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the minimum number of expected messages on the endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedBodiesReceived(java.lang.Object...)">expectedBodiesReceived(...)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the expected bodies that should be received (in order).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" 
 href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectedHeaderReceived(java.lang.String,%20java.lang.String)">expectedHeaderReceived(...)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To define the expected header that should be received</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectsAscending(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsAscending(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that messages are received in order, using the given <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to compare messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apid
 ocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectsDescending(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsDescending(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that messages are received in order, using the given <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to compare messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#expectsNoDuplicates(org.apache.camel.Expression)">expectsNoDuplicates(Expression)</a></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To add an expectation that no duplicate messages are received; using an <a shape="rect" href="expression.html">Expression</a> to calculate a unique identifier for each message. This could be something like the <code>JMSMessageID</code> if using JMS, or some unique reference number wit
 hin the message.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></rich-text-body><p>Here's another example:</p><plain-text-body>resultEndpoint.expectedBodiesReceived("firstMessageBody", "secondMessageBody", "thirdMessageBody");
+</plain-text-body><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Addingexpectationstospecificmessages">Adding expectations to specific messages</h4><p>In addition, you can use the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#message(int)">message(int messageIndex)</a> method to add assertions about a specific message that is received.</p><p>For example, to add expectations of the headers or body of the first message (using zero-based indexing like <code>java.util.List</code>), you can use the following code:</p><plain-text-body>resultEndpoint.message(0).header("foo").isEqualTo("bar");
+</plain-text-body><p>There are some examples of the Mock endpoint in use in the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/">camel-core processor tests</a>.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Mockingexistingendpoints">Mocking existing endpoints</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.7</strong></p><p>Camel now allows you to automatically mock existing endpoints in your Camel routes.</p><parameter ac:name="title">How it works</parameter><rich-text-body><p><strong>Important:</strong> The endpoints are still in action. What happens differently is that a <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a> endpoint is injected and receives the message first and then delegates the message to the target endpoint. You can view this as a kind of intercept and delegate or endpoint listener.</p></rich-text-body><p>Suppose you have the given route below:</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=route|title=Route|lang=java|url=camel
 /trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/interceptor/AdviceWithMockEndpointsTest.java}</plain-text-body><p>You can then use the <code>adviceWith</code> feature in Camel to mock all the endpoints in a given route from your unit test, as shown below:</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|title=adviceWith mocking all endpoints|lang=java|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/interceptor/AdviceWithMockEndpointsTest.java}</plain-text-body><p>Notice that the mock endpoints is given the uri <code>mock:&lt;endpoint&gt;</code>, for example <code>mock:direct:foo</code>. Camel logs at <code>INFO</code> level the endpoints being mocked:</p><plain-text-body>INFO  Adviced endpoint [direct://foo] with mock endpoint [mock:direct:foo]
+</plain-text-body><parameter ac:name="title">Mocked endpoints are without parameters</parameter><rich-text-body><p>Endpoints which are mocked will have their parameters stripped off. For example the endpoint "log:foo?showAll=true" will be mocked to the following endpoint "mock:log:foo". Notice the parameters have been removed.</p></rich-text-body><p>Its also possible to only mock certain endpoints using a pattern. For example to mock all <code>log</code> endpoints you do as shown:</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e2|lang=java|title=adviceWith mocking only log endpoints using a pattern|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/interceptor/AdviceWithMockEndpointsTest.java}</plain-text-body><p>The pattern supported can be a wildcard or a regular expression. See more details about this at <a shape="rect" href="intercept.html">Intercept</a> as its the same matching function used by Camel.</p><rich-text-body><p>Mind that mocking endpoints causes the messages to be
  copied when they arrive on the mock.<br clear="none"> That means Camel will use more memory. This may not be suitable when you send in a lot of messages.</p></rich-text-body><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Mockingexistingendpointsusingthecamel-testcomponent">Mocking existing endpoints using the <code>camel-test</code> component</h4><p>Instead of using the <code>adviceWith</code> to instruct Camel to mock endpoints, you can easily enable this behavior when using the <code>camel-test</code> Test Kit.<br clear="none"> The same route can be tested as follows. Notice that we return <code>"*"</code> from the <code>isMockEndpoints</code> method, which tells Camel to mock all endpoints.<br clear="none"> If you only want to mock all <code>log</code> endpoints you can return <code>"log*"</code> instead.</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=java|title=isMockEndpoints using camel-test kit|url=camel/trunk/components/camel-test/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/patterns/IsMockEndpointsJUnit4Test.java
 }</plain-text-body><h4 id="BookInOnePage-MockingexistingendpointswithXMLDSL">Mocking existing endpoints with XML DSL</h4><p>If you do not use the <code>camel-test</code> component for unit testing (as shown above) you can use a different approach when using XML files for routes.<br clear="none"> The solution is to create a new XML file used by the unit test and then include the intended XML file which has the route you want to test.</p><p>Suppose we have the route in the <code>camel-route.xml</code> file:</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=xml|title=camel-route.xml|url=camel/trunk/components/camel-spring/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/spring/mock/camel-route.xml}</plain-text-body><p>Then we create a new XML file as follows, where we include the <code>camel-route.xml</code> file and define a spring bean with the class <code>org.apache.camel.impl.InterceptSendToMockEndpointStrategy</code> which tells Camel to mock all endpoints:</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=xml|ti
 tle=test-camel-route.xml|url=camel/trunk/components/camel-spring/src/test/resources/org/apache/camel/spring/mock/InterceptSendToMockEndpointStrategyTest.xml}</plain-text-body><p>Then in your unit test you load the new XML file (<code>test-camel-route.xml</code>) instead of <code>camel-route.xml</code>.</p><p>To only mock all <a shape="rect" href="log.html">Log</a> endpoints you can define the pattern in the constructor for the bean:</p><parameter ac:name="">xml</parameter><plain-text-body>&lt;bean id="mockAllEndpoints" class="org.apache.camel.impl.InterceptSendToMockEndpointStrategy"&gt;
+    &lt;constructor-arg index="0" value="log*"/&gt;
+&lt;/bean&gt;
+</plain-text-body><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Mockingendpointsandskipsendingtooriginalendpoint">Mocking endpoints and skip sending to original endpoint</h4><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.10</strong></p><p>Sometimes you want to easily mock and skip sending to a certain endpoints. So the message is detoured and send to the mock endpoint only. From Camel 2.10 onwards you can now use the <code>mockEndpointsAndSkip</code> method using <a shape="rect" href="advicewith.html">AdviceWith</a> or the <a shape="rect" class="unresolved" href="#">Test Kit</a>. The example below will skip sending to the two endpoints <code>"direct:foo"</code>, and <code>"direct:bar"</code>.</p><plain-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=java|title=adviceWith mock and skip sending to endpoints|url=camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/interceptor/AdviceWithMockMultipleEndpointsWithSkipTest.java}</plain-text-body><p>The same example using the <a shape="rect" href="testing.html">Test Kit</a></p><plai
 n-text-body>{snippet:id=e1|lang=java|title=isMockEndpointsAndSkip using camel-test kit|url=camel/trunk/components/camel-test/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/test/patterns/IsMockEndpointsAndSkipJUnit4Test.java}</plain-text-body><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Limitingthenumberofmessagestokeep">Limiting the number of messages to keep</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.10</strong></p><p>The <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a> endpoints will by default keep a copy of every <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> that it received. So if you test with a lot of messages, then it will consume memory.<br clear="none"> From Camel 2.10 onwards we have introduced two options <code>retainFirst</code> and <code>retainLast</code> that can be used to specify to only keep N'th of the first and/or last <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>s.</p><p>For example in the code below, we only want to retain a copy of the first 5 and last 5 <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</
 a>s the mock receives.</p><plain-text-body>  MockEndpoint mock = getMockEndpoint("mock:data");
+  mock.setRetainFirst(5);
+  mock.setRetainLast(5);
+  mock.expectedMessageCount(2000);
 
+  ...
 
-<p>Here's another example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[resultEndpoint.expectedBodiesReceived(&quot;firstMessageBody&quot;, &quot;secondMessageBody&quot;, &quot;thirdMessageBody&quot;);
-]]></script>
-</div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Addingexpectationstospecificmessages">Adding expectations to specific messages</h4><p>In addition, you can use the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/maven/current/camel-core/apidocs/org/apache/camel/component/mock/MockEndpoint.html#message(int)">message(int messageIndex)</a> method to add assertions about a specific message that is received.</p><p>For example, to add expectations of the headers or body of the first message (using zero-based indexing like <code>java.util.List</code>), you can use the following code:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[resultEndpoint.message(0).header(&quot;foo&quot;).isEqualTo(&quot;bar&quot;);
-]]></script>
-</div></div><p>There are some examples of the Mock endpoint in use in the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/camel/trunk/camel-core/src/test/java/org/apache/camel/processor/">camel-core processor tests</a>.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Mockingexistingendpoints">Mocking existing endpoints</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.7</strong></p><p>Camel now allows you to automatically mock existing endpoints in your Camel routes.</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">How it works</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p><strong>Important:</strong> The endpoints are still in action. What happens differently is that a <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a> endpoint is injected and receives the message first and then delegates the message to the target endpoint. You can view this as 
 a kind of intercept and delegate or endpoint listener.</p></div></div><p>Suppose you have the given route below:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeHeader panelHeader pdl" style="border-bottom-width: 1px;"><b>Route</b></div><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
-<script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
-// tag::route[]
-@Override
-protected RouteBuilder createRouteBuilder() throws Exception {
-    return new RouteBuilder() {
-        @Override
-        public void configure() throws Exception {
-            from(&quot;direct:start&quot;).to(&quot;direct:foo&quot;).to(&quot;log:foo&quot;).to(&quot;mock:result&quot;);
+  mock.assertIsSatisfied();
+</plain-text-body><p>Using this has some limitations. The <code>getExchanges()</code> and <code>getReceivedExchanges()</code> methods on the <code>MockEndpoint</code> will return only the retained copies of the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>s. So in the example above, the list will contain 10 <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>s; the first five, and the last five.<br clear="none"> The <code>retainFirst</code> and <code>retainLast</code> options also have limitations on which expectation methods you can use. For example the expectedXXX methods that work on message bodies, headers, etc. will only operate on the retained messages. In the example above they can test only the expectations on the 10 retained messages.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Testingwitharrivaltimes">Testing with arrival times</h3><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.7</strong></p><p>The <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a> endpoint stores the arrival time of the message as a property o
 n the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>.</p><plain-text-body>Date time = exchange.getProperty(Exchange.RECEIVED_TIMESTAMP, Date.class);
+</plain-text-body><p>You can use this information to know when the message arrived on the mock. But it also provides foundation to know the time interval between the previous and next message arrived on the mock. You can use this to set expectations using the <code>arrives</code> DSL on the <a shape="rect" href="mock.html">Mock</a> endpoint.</p><p>For example to say that the first message should arrive between 0-2 seconds before the next you can do:</p><plain-text-body>mock.message(0).arrives().noLaterThan(2).seconds().beforeNext();
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also define this as that 2nd message (0 index based) should arrive no later than 0-2 seconds after the previous:</p><plain-text-body>mock.message(1).arrives().noLaterThan(2).seconds().afterPrevious();
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also use between to set a lower bound. For example suppose that it should be between 1-4 seconds:</p><plain-text-body>mock.message(1).arrives().between(1, 4).seconds().afterPrevious();
+</plain-text-body><p>You can also set the expectation on all messages, for example to say that the gap between them should be at most 1 second:</p><plain-text-body>mock.allMessages().arrives().noLaterThan(1).seconds().beforeNext();
+</plain-text-body><parameter ac:name="title">time units</parameter><rich-text-body><p>In the example above we use <code>seconds</code> as the time unit, but Camel offers <code>milliseconds</code>, and <code>minutes</code> as well.</p></rich-text-body><p><parameter ac:name=""><a shape="rect" href="endpoint-see-also.html">Endpoint See Also</a></parameter></p><ul><li><a shape="rect" href="spring-testing.html">Spring Testing</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="testing.html">Testing</a></li></ul>

[... 17114 lines stripped ...]


Mime
View raw message