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From build...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r999579 [1/3] - in /websites/production/camel/content: book-component-appendix.html book-in-one-page.html cache/main.pageCache jms.html
Date Mon, 17 Oct 2016 22:22:25 GMT
Author: buildbot
Date: Mon Oct 17 22:22:24 2016
New Revision: 999579

Log:
Production update by buildbot for camel

Modified:
    websites/production/camel/content/book-component-appendix.html
    websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html
    websites/production/camel/content/cache/main.pageCache
    websites/production/camel/content/jms.html

Modified: websites/production/camel/content/book-component-appendix.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/camel/content/book-component-appendix.html (original)
+++ websites/production/camel/content/book-component-appendix.html Mon Oct 17 22:22:24 2016
@@ -621,8 +621,8 @@ cometds://localhost:8443/service/mychann
  <div class="confluence-information-macro-body">
   <p>When using CXF in streaming modes (see DataFormat option), then also read about <a shape="rect" href="stream-caching.html">Stream caching</a>.</p>
  </div>
-</div><p>The <strong>cxf:</strong> component provides integration with <a shape="rect" href="http://cxf.apache.org">Apache CXF</a> for connecting to JAX-WS services hosted in CXF.</p><p><style type="text/css">/**/ div.rbtoc1476523271361 {padding: 0px;} div.rbtoc1476523271361 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;} div.rbtoc1476523271361 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;} /**/</style>
- </p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1476523271361"> 
+</div><p>The <strong>cxf:</strong> component provides integration with <a shape="rect" href="http://cxf.apache.org">Apache CXF</a> for connecting to JAX-WS services hosted in CXF.</p><p><style type="text/css">/**/ div.rbtoc1476742753623 {padding: 0px;} div.rbtoc1476742753623 ul {list-style: disc;margin-left: 0px;} div.rbtoc1476742753623 li {margin-left: 0px;padding-left: 0px;} /**/</style>
+ </p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1476742753623"> 
   <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-CXFComponent">CXF Component</a> 
     <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-URIformat">URI format</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-Options">Options</a> 
       <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-Thedescriptionsofthedataformats">The descriptions of the dataformats</a> 
@@ -3095,12 +3095,17 @@ cometds://localhost:8443/service/mychann
    &#160; 
  </div>
  <div class="table-wrap"> 
-  <table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Option</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Default Value</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acceptMessagesWhileStopping</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether the consumer accept messages while it is stopping.</p><p>You may consider enabling this option, if you start and stop <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> routes at run-time, while there are still messages enqueued on the queue. If this option is <strong><code>false</code></strong>, and you stop the <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> route, then messages may be rejected, and the JMS broker would have to attempt re-deliveries, which yet again may be rejected, and eventu
 ally the message may be moved at a dead letter queue on the JMS broker. To avoid this scenario it's recommended this option be set to <strong><code>true</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acknowledgementModeName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS acknowledgement name, which is one of: <strong><code>SESSION_TRANSACTED</code></strong>, <strong><code>CLIENT_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong>,&#160;<strong><code>AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong> or <strong><code>DUPS_OK_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acknowledgementMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS acknowledgement mode defined as an Integer. Allows you to set vendor-spe
 cific extensions to the acknowledgment mode. For the regular modes, it is preferable to use the <strong><code>acknowledgementModeName</code></strong> instead.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>allowNullBody</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.3/2.10.1:</strong> Whether to allow sending messages with no body. If this option is <code>false</code> and the message body is null, then an <strong><code>JMSException</code></strong> is thrown.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>allowReplyManagerQuickStop</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Whether the&#160;<strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer</code></strong> used in the reply managers for request-reply messaging allow th
 e&#160;<strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer.runningAllowed</code></strong> flag to quick stop in case link&#160;<strong><code>JmsConfigurationisAcceptMessagesWhileStopping()</code></strong> is enabled and CamelContext is currently being stopped. This quick stop ability is enabled by default in the regular JMS consumers but to enable for reply managers you must enable this flag.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>alwaysCopyMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If <strong><code>true</code></strong>, Camel will always make a JMS message copy of the message when it is passed to the producer for sending. Copying the message is needed in some situations, such as when a <strong><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></strong> is set.</p><p>Camel will set the <strong><code>alwaysCopyMessage=true</code></strong>, if a <strong
 ><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></strong> is set.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>asyncConsumer</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9:</strong> Whether the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> processes the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> <a shape="rect" href="asynchronous-routing-engine.html">asynchronously</a>. If enabled then the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> may pickup the next message from the JMS queue, while the previous message is being processed asynchronously (by the <a shape="rect" href="asynchronous-routing-engine.html">Asynchronous Routing Engine</a>). This means that messages may be processed not 100% strictly in order. If disabled (as default) then the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> is fully processed before the <strong><code>JmsConsumer
 </code></strong> will pickup the next message from the JMS queue.</p><p><strong>Note</strong>: if <strong><code>transacted</code></strong> has been enabled, then <strong><code>asyncConsumer=true</code></strong> does not run asynchronously, as transactions must be executed synchronously (Camel 3.0 may support asynchronous transactions).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>asyncStartListener</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> Whether to startup the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> message listener asynchronously, when starting a route. For example if a <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> cannot get a connection to a remote JMS broker, then it may block while retrying and/or failover. This will cause Camel to block while starting routes. By setting this option to <code>true</code>, you will let 
 routes startup, while the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> connects to the JMS broker using a dedicated thread in asynchronous mode. If this option is used, then beware that if the connection could not be established, then an exception is logged at <code>WARN</code> level, and the consumer will not be able to receive messages. You can then restart the route to retry.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>asyncStopListener</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> Whether to stop the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> message listener asynchronously, when stopping a route.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>autoStartup</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>
 Specifies whether the consumer container should auto-startup.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>cacheLevel</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd">&#160;</td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Sets the cache level by ID for the underlying JMS resources. See&#160;<strong><code>cacheLevelName</code></strong> option for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>cacheLevelName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"> 
+  <table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Option</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Default Value</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acceptMessagesWhileStopping</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether the consumer accept messages while it is stopping.</p><p>You may consider enabling this option, if you start and stop <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> routes at run-time, while there are still messages enqueued on the queue. If this option is <strong><code>false</code></strong>, and you stop the <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> route, then messages may be rejected, and the JMS broker would have to attempt re-deliveries, which yet again may be rejected, and eventu
 ally the message may be moved at a dead letter queue on the JMS broker. To avoid this scenario it's recommended this option be set to <strong><code>true</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acknowledgementModeName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS acknowledgement name, which is one of: </p> 
+      <ul><li><strong><code>SESSION_TRANSACTED</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CLIENT_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>DUPS_OK_ACKNOWLEDGE</code></strong>.</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>acknowledgementMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS acknowledgement mode defined as an Integer. Allows you to set vendor-specific extensions to the acknowledgment mode. For the regular modes, it is preferable to use the <strong><code>acknowledgementModeName</code></strong> instead.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>allowNullBody</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.3/2.10.1:</strong> Whether t
 o allow sending messages with no body. If this option is <code>false</code> and the message body is null, then an <strong><code>JMSException</code></strong> is thrown.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>allowReplyManagerQuickStop</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Whether the&#160;<strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer</code></strong> used in the reply managers for request-reply messaging allow the&#160;<strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer.runningAllowed</code></strong> flag to quick stop in case link&#160;<strong><code>JmsConfigurationisAcceptMessagesWhileStopping()</code></strong> is enabled and CamelContext is currently being stopped. This quick stop ability is enabled by default in the regular JMS consumers but to enable for reply managers you must enable this flag.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" clas
 s="confluenceTd"><p><code>alwaysCopyMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If <strong><code>true</code></strong>, Camel will always make a JMS message copy of the message when it is passed to the producer for sending. Copying the message is needed in some situations, such as when a <strong><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></strong> is set.</p><p>Camel will set the <strong><code>alwaysCopyMessage=true</code></strong>, if a <strong><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></strong> is set.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>asyncConsumer</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9:</strong> Whether the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> processes the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange<
 /a> <a shape="rect" href="asynchronous-routing-engine.html">asynchronously</a>. If enabled then the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> may pickup the next message from the JMS queue, while the previous message is being processed asynchronously (by the <a shape="rect" href="asynchronous-routing-engine.html">Asynchronous Routing Engine</a>). This means that messages may be processed not 100% strictly in order. If disabled (as default) then the <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> is fully processed before the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> will pickup the next message from the JMS queue.</p><p><strong>Note</strong>: if <strong><code>transacted</code></strong> has been enabled, then <strong><code>asyncConsumer=true</code></strong> does not run asynchronously, as transactions must be executed synchronously (Camel 3.0 may support asynchronous transactions).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>asyncStartListener</code><
 /p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> Whether to startup the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> message listener asynchronously, when starting a route. For example if a <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> cannot get a connection to a remote JMS broker, then it may block while retrying and/or failover. This will cause Camel to block while starting routes. By setting this option to <code>true</code>, you will let routes startup, while the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> connects to the JMS broker using a dedicated thread in asynchronous mode. If this option is used, then beware that if the connection could not be established, then an exception is logged at <code>WARN</code> level, and the consumer will not be able to receive messages. You can then restart the route to retry.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluen
 ceTd"><p><code>asyncStopListener</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10:</strong> Whether to stop the <strong><code>JmsConsumer</code></strong> message listener asynchronously, when stopping a route.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>autoStartup</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether the consumer container should auto-startup.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>cacheLevel</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd">&#160;</td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Sets the cache level by ID for the underlying JMS resources. See&#160;<strong><code>cacheLevelName</code></strong> option for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td col
 span="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>cacheLevelName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"> 
       <ul><li><p><code>CACHE_AUTO</code>&#160;(Camel &gt;= 2.8.0)<code> <br clear="none"></code></p></li><li><p><code>CACHE_CONSUMER </code>(Camel &lt;= 2.7.1)</p></li></ul></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Sets the cache level by name for the underlying JMS resources. Valid values are:</p> 
-      <ul><li><strong><code>CACHE_AUTO</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_CONNECTION</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong></li></ul><p>From <strong>Camel 2.8</strong>: the default is <strong><code>CACHE_AUTO</code></strong>.</p><p>For <strong>Camel 2.7.1</strong> and older the default is <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong>.</p><p>See the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/DefaultMessageListenerContainer.html" rel="nofollow">Spring documentation</a> and <a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-transactionCacheLevels">Transactions Cache Levels</a> for more information.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>connectionFactory</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</
 code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The default JMS connection factory to use for the&#160;<strong><code>listenerConnectionFactory</code></strong> and <strong><code>templateConnectionFactory</code></strong>, if neither is specified.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>consumerType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Default</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The Spring JMS listener type to use. A valid value is one of: <strong><code>Simple</code>, <code>Default</code></strong> or <strong><code>Custom</code></strong>.</p> 
+      <ul><li><strong><code><strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong></code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_CONNECTION</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>CACHE_AUTO</code></strong></li></ul><p>From <strong>Camel 2.8</strong>: the default is <strong><code>CACHE_AUTO</code></strong>.</p><p>For <strong>Camel 2.7.1</strong> and older the default is <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong>.</p><p>See the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/DefaultMessageListenerContainer.html" rel="nofollow">Spring documentation</a> and <a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-transactionCacheLevels">Transactions Cache Levels</a> for more information.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>connectionFactory</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class=
 "confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The default JMS connection factory to use for the&#160;<strong><code>listenerConnectionFactory</code></strong> and <strong><code>templateConnectionFactory</code></strong>, if neither is specified.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>consumerType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Default</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The Spring JMS listener type to use. A valid value is one of: <strong><code>Simple</code>, <code>Default</code></strong> or <strong><code>Custom</code></strong>.</p> 
       <div class="table-wrap"> 
        <table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p><code>consumerType</code></p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Spring JMS Listener Type</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Default</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong><code>org.springframework.jms.listener.DefaultMessageListenerContainer</code></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Simple</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong><code>org.springframework.jms.listener.SimpleMessageListenerContainer</code></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Custom</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>From <strong>Camel 2.10.2</strong>: The <strong><code>MessageListenerContainerFactory</code></strong> defined by the <strong><code>messageListenerCo
 ntainerFactoryRef</code></strong> option which will determine what <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.listener.AbstractMessageListenerContainer </code></strong>to use.</p></td></tr></tbody></table> 
-      </div><p>This option was temporarily removed in Camel 2.7 and 2.8 but was re-added in Camel 2.9.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>defaultTaskExecutorType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>SimpleAsync</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.4:</strong> Specifies what default&#160;<strong><code>TaskExecutor</code></strong> type to use in the <strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer</code></strong>, for both consumer endpoints and the&#160;<strong><code>ReplyTo</code></strong> consumer of producer endpoints. Possible values: <strong><code>SimpleAsync</code></strong> (uses Spring's <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/core/task/SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor.html" rel="nofollow">SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor</a>) or <strong><code>ThreadPool</code></strong> (uses Spring's <a s
 hape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/scheduling/concurrent/ThreadPoolTaskExecutor.html" rel="nofollow">ThreadPoolTaskExecutor</a> with optimal values - cached threadpool-like).</p><p>If not set, it defaults to the previous behavior, which uses a cached thread pool for consumer endpoints and&#160;<strong><code>SimpleAsync</code></strong> for reply consumers.</p><p>The use of <strong><code>ThreadPool</code></strong> is recommended to reduce "thread trash" in elastic configurations with dynamically increasing and decreasing concurrent consumers.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>deliveryMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.12.2/2.13:</strong> Specifies the delivery mode to be used. Possibles values are those defined by <strong><code>j
 avax.jms.DeliveryMode</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>deliveryPersistent</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether persistent delivery is used by default.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS Destination object to use on this endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>destinationName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS destination name to use on this endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><c
 ode>destinationResolver</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>A pluggable <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.destination.DestinationResolver</code></strong> that allows you to use your own resolver (for example, to lookup the real destination in a JNDI registry).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>disableTimeToLive</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8:</strong> Use this option to force disabling time to live. For example when you do request/reply over JMS, then Camel will by default use the <strong><code>requestTimeout</code></strong> value as time to live on the message being sent. The problem is that the sender and receiver systems have to have their clocks synchronized, so they are in sync. This is n
 ot always so easy to archive. So you can use <strong><code>disableTimeToLive=true</code></strong> to <strong>not</strong> set a time to live value on the sent message. Then the message will not expire on the receiver system.</p><p>See below in section <em>About time to live</em> for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>eagerLoadingOfProperties</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Enables eager loading of JMS properties as soon as a message is received, which is generally inefficient, because the JMS properties might not be required. But this feature can sometimes catch early any issues with the underlying JMS provider and the use of JMS properties. This feature can also be used for testing purposes, to ensure JMS properties can be understood and handled correctly.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenc
 eTd"><p><code>errorHandler</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8.2, 2.9:</strong> Specifies a <strong><code>org.springframework.util.ErrorHandler</code></strong> to be invoked in case of any uncaught exceptions thrown while processing a <strong><code>Message</code></strong>.</p><p>By default these exceptions will be logged at the&#160;<strong><code>WARN</code></strong> level, if no <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong> has been configured.</p><p>From <strong>Camel 2.9.1</strong>: you can configure logging level and whether stack traces should be logged using the below two options. This makes it much easier to configure, than having to code a custom <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>errorHandlerLoggingLevel</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p
 ><code>WARN</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.1:</strong> Configures the logging level at which the <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong> will log uncaught exceptions.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>errorHandlerLogStackTrace</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.1:</strong> Controls whether a stacktrace should be logged by the default <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>exceptionListener</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS Exception Listener that is to be notified of any underlying JMS exceptions.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflue
 nceTd"><p><code>explicitQosEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Set if the <strong><code>deliveryMode</code>, <code>priority</code></strong> or <strong><code>timeToLive</code></strong> qualities of service should be used when sending messages. This option is based on Spring's <strong><code>JmsTemplate</code></strong>. The <strong><code>deliveryMode</code>, <code>priority</code></strong> and <strong><code>timeToLive</code></strong> options are applied to the current endpoint. This contrasts with the <strong><code>preserveMessageQos</code></strong> option, which operates at message granularity, reading QoS properties exclusively from the Camel In message headers.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>exposeListenerSession</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rows
 pan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether the listener session should be exposed when consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>forceSendOriginalMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.7:</strong> When using <strong><code>mapJmsMessage=false</code></strong> Camel will create a new JMS message to send to a new JMS destination if you touch the headers (get or set) during the route. Set this option to <strong><code>true</code></strong> to force Camel to send the original JMS message that was received.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>idleConsumerLimit</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8.2</strong>, <strong>2.9</strong>: Specify the lim
 it for the number of consumers that are allowed to be idle at any given time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>idleTaskExecutionLimit</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the limit for idle executions of a receive task, not having received any message within its execution. If this limit is reached, the task will shut down and leave receiving to other executing tasks (in the case of dynamic scheduling; see the <strong><code>maxConcurrentConsumers</code></strong> setting). There is additional doc available from <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/DefaultMessageListenerContainer.html#setIdleTaskExecutionLimit-int-" rel="nofollow">Spring</a>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>includeSentJMSMessageI
 D</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.3:</strong> Only applicable when sending to JMS destination using&#160;<strong><code>InOnly</code></strong>, e.g., fire and forget. Enabling this option will enrich the Camel <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> with the actual&#160;<strong><code>JMSMessageID</code></strong> that was used by the JMS client when the message was sent to the JMS destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>includeAllJMSXProperties</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.11.2/2.12:</strong> Whether to include all&#160;<strong><code>JMSXxxx</code></strong> properties when mapping from JMS to Camel Message. When set to <code>true</code> properties such as <strong><co
 de>JMSXAppID</code></strong>, and <strong><code>JMSXUserID</code></strong> etc will be included.</p><p><strong>Note:</strong> If you are using a custom <strong><code>headerFilterStrategy</code></strong> then this option does not apply.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>jmsKeyFormatStrategy</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>default</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Pluggable strategy for encoding and decoding JMS keys so they can be compliant with the JMS specification. Camel provides two implementations out of the box: <strong><code>default</code></strong> and <strong><code>passthrough</code></strong>. The <strong><code>default</code></strong> strategy will safely marshal dots and hyphens (<code>.</code> and <code>-</code>).</p><p>The <strong><code>passthrough</code></strong> strategy leaves the key as is. Can be used for JMS brokers which do not care whether JMS header k
 eys contain illegal characters.</p><p>You can provide your own implementation of the <strong><code>org.apache.camel.component.jms.JmsKeyFormatStrategy</code></strong> and refer to it using the <strong><code>#</code></strong> notation.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>jmsMessageType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to force the use of a specific&#160;<strong><code>javax.jms.Message</code></strong> implementation for sending JMS messages. Possible values are: <strong><code>Bytes</code>, <code>Map</code></strong>, <strong><code>Object</code>, <code>Stream</code></strong>, <strong><code>Text</code></strong>. By default Camel determines which JMS message type to use for the&#160;<strong><code>In</code></strong> body type. This option will override the default behavior.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confl
 uenceTd"><p><code>jmsOperations</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to use your own implementation of the <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.core.JmsOperations</code></strong> interface. Camel uses <strong><code>JmsTemplate</code></strong> as default. Can be used for testing purpose, but not used much as stated in the spring API docs.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>lazyCreateTransactionManager</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If <strong><code>true</code></strong>, Camel will create a <strong><code>JmsTransactionManager</code></strong>, if there is no <strong><code>transactionManager</code></strong> injected when option <strong><code>transacted=true</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1"
  class="confluenceTd"><p><code>listenerConnectionFactory</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS connection factory used for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>mapJmsMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether Camel should auto map the received JMS message to an appropriate payload type, such as <strong><code>javax.jms.TextMessage</code></strong> to a&#160;<strong><code>java.lang.</code><code>String</code></strong> etc. See below for more details on how message type mapping works.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>maximumBrowseSize</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1"
  class="confluenceTd"><p>Limits the number of messages fetched at most, when browsing endpoints using <a shape="rect" href="browse.html">Browse</a> or JMX API.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageConverter</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To use a custom Spring <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.converter.MessageConverter</code></strong> so you can be 100% in control how to map to/from a <strong><code>javax.jms.Message</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageIdEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>When sending, specifies whether message IDs should be added.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageListener
 ContainerFactoryRef</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.2:</strong> Registry ID of the <strong><code>MessageListenerContainerFactory</code></strong> used to determine what <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.listener.AbstractMessageListenerContainer</code></strong> to use to consume messages.</p><p>Setting this will automatically set <strong><code>consumerType</code></strong> to <strong><code>Custom</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageTimestampEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether time-stamps should be enabled by default on sending messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>password</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan=
 "1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The password for the connector factory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>priority</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>4</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Values greater than&#160;<strong><code>1</code></strong> specify the message priority when sending (where&#160;<strong><code>0</code></strong> is the lowest priority and&#160;<strong><code>9</code></strong> is the highest). The <strong><code>explicitQosEnabled</code></strong> option <em>must</em> also be enabled in order for this option to have any effect.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>pubSubNoLocal</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether to inhibit th
 e delivery of messages published by its own connection.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>receiveTimeout</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1000</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The timeout for receiving messages (in milliseconds).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>recoveryInterval</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>5000</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the interval between recovery attempts, e.g., when a connection is being refreshed, in milliseconds. The default is <code><strong>5000</strong> ms</code>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToSameDestinationAllowed</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p
 ><strong>Camel 2.16:</strong> <strong>Consumer only:</strong> Whether a JMS consumer is allowed to send a reply message to the same destination that the consumer is using to consume from. This prevents an endless loop by consuming and sending back the same message to itself.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToCacheLevelName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.1:</strong> Sets the cache level by name for the reply consumer when doing request/reply over JMS. This option only applies when using fixed reply queues (not temporary). Camel will by default use: <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong> for exclusive or shared w/<strong><code>replyToSelectorName</code></strong> and <strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong> for shared without <strong><code>replyToSelectorName</code></strong>. Some JMS broke
 rs such as IBM WebSphere may require this parameter to be set to <strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong> in order to work.</p><p><strong>Note:</strong> The value <strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong> cannot be used with temporary queues. A higher value, such as <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong> or <strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong>, must be used.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Sets the JMS Selector using the fixed name to be used so you can filter out your own replies from the others when using a shared queue (that is, if you are not using a temporary reply queue).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToDeliveryPersistent</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</c
 ode></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether to use persistent delivery by default for replies.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>requestTimeoutCheckerInterval</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1000</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.2:</strong> Configures how often Camel should check for timed out <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>s when doing request/reply over JMS. By default Camel checks once per second. But if you must react faster when a timeout occurs, then you can lower this interval, to check more frequently. The timeout is determined by the option <strong><code>requestTimeout</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>subscriptionDurable</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1"
  rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated:</strong> Enabled by default, if you specify a <strong><code>durableSubscriptionName</code></strong> and a <strong><code>clientId</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>taskExecutor</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to specify a custom task executor for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>taskExecutorSpring2</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.6:</strong> To use when using Spring 2.x with Camel. Allows you to specify a custom task executor for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>templateConnectionFactory</code></p></
 td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS connection factory used for sending messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactedInOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated:</strong> Specifies whether to use transacted mode for sending messages using the&#160;<strong><code>InOut</code></strong> <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a>. Applies only to producer endpoints. See section <a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-transactedConsumption">Enabling Transacted Consumption</a> for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionManager</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td co
 lspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The Spring transaction manager to use.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>"JmsConsumer[destinationName]"</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The name of the transaction to use.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionTimeout</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The timeout value of the transaction (in seconds), if using transacted mode.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferException</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If enabled and you are using <a shape="rect" href="request-
 reply.html">Request Reply</a> messaging (<strong><code>InOut</code></strong>) and an <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> failed on the consumer side, then the caused <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> will be send back in response as a <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong>. If the client is Camel, the returned <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> is re-thrown. This allows you to use Camel <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> as a bridge in your routing - for example, using persistent queues to enable robust routing. Notice that if you also have <strong><code>transferExchange</code></strong> enabled, this option takes precedence. The caught exception is required to be serializable. The original <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> on the consumer side can be wrapped in an outer exception such as <strong><code>org.apache.camel.RuntimeCamelException</code></strong> when returned to the producer.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" cl
 ass="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferExchange</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>You can transfer the exchange over the wire instead of just the body and headers. The following fields are transferred: In body, Out body, Fault body, In headers, Out headers, Fault headers, exchange properties, exchange exception. This requires that the objects are serializable. Camel will exclude any non-serializable objects and log it at&#160;<strong><code>WARN</code></strong> level.</p><p>You <em>must</em> enable this option on <em>both</em> the producer <em>and</em> the consumer side, so Camel will know that the payload is an Exchange and not a regular payload.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferFault</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><
 p><strong>Camel 2.17:</strong> If enabled and you are using Request Reply messaging (<strong><code>InOut</code></strong>) and an Exchange failed with a SOAP fault (not exception) on the consumer side, then the fault flag on&#160;<strong><code>org.apache.camel.Message.isFault()</code></strong> will be send back in the response as a JMS header with the key <strong><code>JmsConstants.JMS_TRANSFER_FAULT</code></strong>. If the client is Camel, the returned fault flag will be set on the <strong><code>org.apache.camel.Message.setFault(boolean)</code></strong>.</p><p>You may want to enable this when using Camel components that support faults such as SOAP based such as CXF or spring-ws.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>username</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The username for the connector factory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan
 ="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>useMessageIDAsCorrelationID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether <strong><code>JMSMessageID</code></strong> should always be used as <strong><code>JMSCorrelationID</code></strong> for&#160;<strong><code>InOut</code></strong> messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>useVersion102</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated (removed from Camel 2.5 onward)</strong> Specifies whether the old JMS API should be used.</p></td></tr></tbody></table> 
+      </div><p>This option was temporarily removed in Camel 2.7 and 2.8 but was re-added in Camel 2.9.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>defaultTaskExecutorType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>SimpleAsync</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.4:</strong> Specifies what default&#160;<strong><code>TaskExecutor</code></strong> type to use in the <strong><code>DefaultMessageListenerContainer</code></strong>, for both consumer endpoints and the&#160;<strong><code>ReplyTo</code></strong> consumer of producer endpoints. Possible values: <strong><code>SimpleAsync</code></strong> (uses Spring's <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/core/task/SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor.html" rel="nofollow">SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor</a>) or <strong><code>ThreadPool</code></strong> (uses Spring's <a s
 hape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/scheduling/concurrent/ThreadPoolTaskExecutor.html" rel="nofollow">ThreadPoolTaskExecutor</a> with optimal values - cached threadpool-like).</p><p>If not set, it defaults to the previous behavior, which uses a cached thread pool for consumer endpoints and&#160;<strong><code>SimpleAsync</code></strong> for reply consumers.</p><p>The use of <strong><code>ThreadPool</code></strong> is recommended to reduce "thread trash" in elastic configurations with dynamically increasing and decreasing concurrent consumers.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>deliveryMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.12.2/2.13:</strong> Specifies the delivery mode to be used. Possibles values are those defined by <strong><code>j
 avax.jms.DeliveryMode</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>deliveryPersistent</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether persistent delivery is used by default.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS Destination object to use on this endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>destinationName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS destination name to use on this endpoint.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><c
 ode>destinationResolver</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>A pluggable <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.destination.DestinationResolver</code></strong> that allows you to use your own resolver (for example, to lookup the real destination in a JNDI registry).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>disableTimeToLive</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8:</strong> Use this option to force disabling time to live. For example when you do request/reply over JMS, then Camel will by default use the <strong><code>requestTimeout</code></strong> value as time to live on the message being sent. The problem is that the sender and receiver systems have to have their clocks synchronized, so they are in sync. This is n
 ot always so easy to archive. So you can use <strong><code>disableTimeToLive=true</code></strong> to <strong>not</strong> set a time to live value on the sent message. Then the message will not expire on the receiver system.</p><p>See below in section <em>About time to live</em> for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>eagerLoadingOfProperties</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Enables eager loading of JMS properties as soon as a message is received, which is generally inefficient, because the JMS properties might not be required. But this feature can sometimes catch early any issues with the underlying JMS provider and the use of JMS properties. This feature can also be used for testing purposes, to ensure JMS properties can be understood and handled correctly.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenc
 eTd"><p><code>errorHandler</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8.2, 2.9:</strong> Specifies a <strong><code>org.springframework.util.ErrorHandler</code></strong> to be invoked in case of any uncaught exceptions thrown while processing a <strong><code>Message</code></strong>.</p><p>By default these exceptions will be logged at the&#160;<strong><code>WARN</code></strong> level, if no <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong> has been configured.</p><p>From <strong>Camel 2.9.1</strong>: you can configure logging level and whether stack traces should be logged using the below two options. This makes it much easier to configure, than having to code a custom <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>errorHandlerLoggingLevel</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p
 ><code>WARN</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.1:</strong> Configures the logging level at which the <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong> will log uncaught exceptions.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>errorHandlerLogStackTrace</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.1:</strong> Controls whether a stacktrace should be logged by the default <strong><code>errorHandler</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>exceptionListener</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the JMS Exception Listener that is to be notified of any underlying JMS exceptions.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflue
 nceTd"><p><code>explicitQosEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Set if the <strong><code>deliveryMode</code>, <code>priority</code></strong> or <strong><code>timeToLive</code></strong> qualities of service should be used when sending messages. This option is based on Spring's <strong><code>JmsTemplate</code></strong>. The <strong><code>deliveryMode</code>, <code>priority</code></strong> and <strong><code>timeToLive</code></strong> options are applied to the current endpoint. This contrasts with the <strong><code>preserveMessageQos</code></strong> option, which operates at message granularity, reading QoS properties exclusively from the Camel In message headers.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>exposeListenerSession</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rows
 pan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether the listener session should be exposed when consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>forceSendOriginalMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.7:</strong> When using <strong><code>mapJmsMessage=false</code></strong> Camel will create a new JMS message to send to a new JMS destination if you touch the headers (get or set) during the route. Set this option to <strong><code>true</code></strong> to force Camel to send the original JMS message that was received.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>idleConsumerLimit</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.8.2</strong>, <strong>2.9</strong>: Specify the lim
 it for the number of consumers that are allowed to be idle at any given time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>idleTaskExecutionLimit</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the limit for idle executions of a receive task, not having received any message within its execution. If this limit is reached, the task will shut down and leave receiving to other executing tasks (in the case of dynamic scheduling; see the <strong><code>maxConcurrentConsumers</code></strong> setting). There is additional doc available from <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/DefaultMessageListenerContainer.html#setIdleTaskExecutionLimit-int-" rel="nofollow">Spring</a>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>includeSentJMSMessageI
 D</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.3:</strong> Only applicable when sending to JMS destination using&#160;<strong><code>InOnly</code></strong>, e.g., fire and forget. Enabling this option will enrich the Camel <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> with the actual&#160;<strong><code>JMSMessageID</code></strong> that was used by the JMS client when the message was sent to the JMS destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>includeAllJMSXProperties</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.11.2/2.12:</strong> Whether to include all&#160;<strong><code>JMSXxxx</code></strong> properties when mapping from JMS to Camel Message. When set to <code>true</code> properties such as <strong><co
 de>JMSXAppID</code></strong>, and <strong><code>JMSXUserID</code></strong> etc will be included.</p><p><strong>Note:</strong> If you are using a custom <strong><code>headerFilterStrategy</code></strong> then this option does not apply.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>jmsKeyFormatStrategy</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>default</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Pluggable strategy for encoding and decoding JMS keys so they can be compliant with the JMS specification.</p> 
+      <div class="table-wrap"> 
+       <table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh">Strategy</th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh">Description</th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><code>default</code></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd">Safely marshals dots and hyphens, <code>'<strong>.</strong>'</code> and&#160;<code>'<strong>-</strong>'</code>.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><code>passthrough</code></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd">Leaves the key as is. Appropriate for use with any JMS broker that tolerates JMS header keys containing illegal characters.</td></tr></tbody></table> 
+      </div><p><strong>Note</strong>: optionally, a custom implementation can be provided of a <strong><code>org.apache.camel.component.jms.JmsKeyFormatStrategy</code></strong> and referred to using the <strong><code>#</code></strong> notation.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>jmsMessageType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to force the use of a specific&#160;<strong><code>javax.jms.Message</code></strong> implementation for sending JMS messages. Possible values are: </p> 
+      <ul><li><strong><code>Bytes</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>Map</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>Object</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>Stream</code></strong></li><li><strong><code>Text</code></strong></li></ul><p>By default Camel determines which JMS message type to use for the&#160;<strong><code>In</code></strong> body type. This option will override the default behavior.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>jmsOperations</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to use your own implementation of the <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.core.JmsOperations</code></strong> interface. Camel uses <strong><code>JmsTemplate</code></strong> by default. Can be used for testing purpose, but not used much as stated in the spring API docs.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>lazyC
 reateTransactionManager</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If <strong><code>true</code></strong>, Camel will create a <strong><code>JmsTransactionManager</code></strong>, if there is no <strong><code>transactionManager</code></strong> injected when option <strong><code>transacted=true</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>listenerConnectionFactory</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS connection factory used for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>mapJmsMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether Camel should auto map the rece
 ived JMS message to an appropriate payload type, such as <strong><code>javax.jms.TextMessage</code></strong> to a&#160;<strong><code>java.lang.</code><code>String</code></strong> etc. See below for more details on how message type mapping works.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>maximumBrowseSize</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-1</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Limits the number of messages fetched at most, when browsing endpoints using <a shape="rect" href="browse.html">Browse</a> or JMX API.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageConverter</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>To use a custom Spring <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.converter.MessageConverter</code></strong> so you can be 100% in control h
 ow to map to/from a <strong><code>javax.jms.Message</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageIdEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>When sending, specifies whether message IDs should be added.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageListenerContainerFactoryRef</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.10.2:</strong> Registry ID of the <strong><code>MessageListenerContainerFactory</code></strong> used to determine what <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.listener.AbstractMessageListenerContainer</code></strong> to use to consume messages.</p><p>Setting this will automatically set <strong><code>consumerType</code></strong> to <strong><code>Custom</code><
 /strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>messageTimestampEnabled</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether time-stamps should be enabled by default on sending messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>password</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The password for the connector factory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>priority</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>4</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Values greater than&#160;<strong><code>1</code></strong> specify the message priority when sending (where&#160;<strong><code>0</code></strong> is the lowest priority an
 d&#160;<strong><code>9</code></strong> is the highest). The <strong><code>explicitQosEnabled</code></strong> option <em>must</em> also be enabled in order for this option to have any effect.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>pubSubNoLocal</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether to inhibit the delivery of messages published by its own connection.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>receiveTimeout</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1000</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The timeout for receiving messages (in milliseconds).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>recoveryInterval</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>5000</code></p></td><td colspa
 n="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies the interval between recovery attempts, e.g., when a connection is being refreshed, in milliseconds. The default is <code><strong>5000</strong> ms</code>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToSameDestinationAllowed</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.16:</strong> <strong>Consumer only:</strong> Whether a JMS consumer is allowed to send a reply message to the same destination that the consumer is using to consume from. This prevents an endless loop by consuming and sending back the same message to itself.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToCacheLevelName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Came
 l 2.9.1:</strong> Sets the cache level by name for the reply consumer when doing request/reply over JMS. This option only applies when using fixed reply queues (not temporary). Camel will by default use: <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong> for exclusive or shared w/<strong><code>replyToSelectorName</code></strong> and <strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong> for shared without <strong><code>replyToSelectorName</code></strong>. Some JMS brokers such as IBM WebSphere may require this parameter to be set to <strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong> in order to work.</p><p><strong>Note:</strong> The value <strong><code>CACHE_NONE</code></strong> cannot be used with temporary queues. A higher value, such as <strong><code>CACHE_CONSUMER</code></strong> or <strong><code>CACHE_SESSION</code></strong>, must be used.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToDestinationSelectorName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceT
 d"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Sets the JMS Selector using the fixed name to be used so you can filter out your own replies from the others when using a shared queue (that is, if you are not using a temporary reply queue).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>replyToDeliveryPersistent</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether to use persistent delivery by default for replies.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>requestTimeoutCheckerInterval</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>1000</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.9.2:</strong> Configures how often Camel should check for timed out <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a>s when doing request/re
 ply over JMS. By default Camel checks once per second. But if you must react faster when a timeout occurs, then you can lower this interval, to check more frequently. The timeout is determined by the option <strong><code>requestTimeout</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>subscriptionDurable</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated:</strong> Enabled by default, if you specify a <strong><code>durableSubscriptionName</code></strong> and a <strong><code>clientId</code></strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>taskExecutor</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Allows you to specify a custom task executor for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" r
 owspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>taskExecutorSpring2</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.6:</strong> To use when using Spring 2.x with Camel. Allows you to specify a custom task executor for consuming messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>templateConnectionFactory</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS connection factory used for sending messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactedInOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated:</strong> Specifies whether to use transacted mode for sending messages using the&#160;<strong><
 code>InOut</code></strong> <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a>. Applies only to producer endpoints. See section <a shape="rect" href="#BookComponentAppendix-transactedConsumption">Enabling Transacted Consumption</a> for more details.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionManager</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The Spring transaction manager to use.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionName</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>"JmsConsumer[destinationName]"</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The name of the transaction to use.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transactionTimeout</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"
 ><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The timeout value of the transaction (in seconds), if using transacted mode.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferException</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>If enabled and you are using <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a> messaging (<strong><code>InOut</code></strong>) and an <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> failed on the consumer side, then the caused <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> will be send back in response as a <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong>. If the client is Camel, the returned <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> is re-thrown. This allows you to use Camel <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> as a bridge in your routing - for example, using persistent queues to 
 enable robust routing. Notice that if you also have <strong><code>transferExchange</code></strong> enabled, this option takes precedence. The caught exception is required to be serializable. The original <strong><code>Exception</code></strong> on the consumer side can be wrapped in an outer exception such as <strong><code>org.apache.camel.RuntimeCamelException</code></strong> when returned to the producer.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferExchange</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>You can transfer the exchange over the wire instead of just the body and headers. The following fields are transferred: In body, Out body, Fault body, In headers, Out headers, Fault headers, exchange properties, exchange exception. This requires that the objects are serializable. Camel will exclude any non-serializable objects and log it at&#160;<
 strong><code>WARN</code></strong> level.</p><p>You <em>must</em> enable this option on <em>both</em> the producer <em>and</em> the consumer side, so Camel will know that the payload is an Exchange and not a regular payload.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>transferFault</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>Camel 2.17:</strong> If enabled and you are using Request Reply messaging (<strong><code>InOut</code></strong>) and an Exchange failed with a SOAP fault (not exception) on the consumer side, then the fault flag on&#160;<strong><code>org.apache.camel.Message.isFault()</code></strong> will be send back in the response as a JMS header with the key <strong><code>JmsConstants.JMS_TRANSFER_FAULT</code></strong>. If the client is Camel, the returned fault flag will be set on the <strong><code>org.apache.camel.Message.setFault(boole
 an)</code></strong>.</p><p>You may want to enable this when using Camel components that support faults such as SOAP based such as CXF or spring-ws.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>username</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>null</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The username for the connector factory.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>useMessageIDAsCorrelationID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Specifies whether <strong><code>JMSMessageID</code></strong> should always be used as <strong><code>JMSCorrelationID</code></strong> for&#160;<strong><code>InOut</code></strong> messages.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>useVersion102</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conf
 luenceTd"><p><code>false</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><strong>@deprecated (removed from Camel 2.5 onward)</strong> Specifies whether the old JMS API should be used.</p></td></tr></tbody></table> 
  </div>
 </div><h3 id="BookComponentAppendix-MessageMappingBetweenJMSandCamel">Message Mapping Between JMS and Camel</h3><p>Camel automatically maps messages between <strong><code>javax.jms.Message</code></strong> and <strong><code>org.apache.camel.Message</code></strong>. When sending a JMS message, Camel converts the message body to the following JMS message types:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall">
  <div class="table-wrap"> 
@@ -3110,7 +3115,7 @@ cometds://localhost:8443/service/mychann
  <div class="table-wrap"> 
   <table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>JMS Message</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Body Type</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.BytesMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>byte[]</code></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.MapMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Map&lt;String, Object&gt;</code></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>Object</code></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.TextMessage</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td></tr></tbody></table> 
  </div>
-</div><h4 id="BookComponentAppendix-Disablingauto-mappingofJMSmessages">Disabling auto-mapping of JMS messages</h4><p>You can use the <code>mapJmsMessage</code> option to disable the auto-mapping above. If disabled, Camel will not try to map the received JMS message, but instead uses it directly as the payload. This allows you to avoid the overhead of mapping and let Camel just pass through the JMS message. For instance, it even allows you to route <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong> JMS messages with classes you do <strong>not</strong> have on the classpath.</p><h4 id="BookComponentAppendix-UsingacustomMessageConverter">Using a custom MessageConverter</h4><p>You can use the <strong><code>messageConverter</code></strong> option to do the mapping yourself in a Spring <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.converter.MessageConverter</code></strong> class.</p><p>For example, in the route below we use a custom message converter when sending a message to the JMS 
 order queue:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;">
+</div><h4 id="BookComponentAppendix-Disablingauto-mappingofJMSmessages">Disabling auto-mapping of JMS messages</h4><p>You can use the <strong><code>mapJmsMessage</code></strong> option to disable the auto-mapping above. If disabled, Camel will not try to map the received JMS message, but instead uses it directly as the payload. This allows you to avoid the overhead of mapping and let Camel just pass through the JMS message. For instance, it even allows you to route <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong> JMS messages with classes you do <strong>not</strong> have on the classpath.</p><h4 id="BookComponentAppendix-UsingacustomMessageConverter">Using a custom MessageConverter</h4><p>You can use the <strong><code>messageConverter</code></strong> option to do the mapping yourself in a Spring <strong><code>org.springframework.jms.support.converter.MessageConverter</code></strong> class.</p><p>For example, in the route below we use a custom message converter when sending a me
 ssage to the JMS order queue:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;">
  <div class="codeContent panelContent pdl"> 
   <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter">from(&amp;quot;file://inbox/order&amp;quot;) .to(&amp;quot;jms:queue:order?messageConverter=#myMessageConverter&amp;quot;); </script> 
  </div>



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