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From build...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r994391 [2/3] - in /websites/production/camel/content: book-component-appendix.html book-in-one-page.html cache/main.pageCache jms.html
Date Wed, 03 Aug 2016 19:18:54 GMT
Modified: websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html
==============================================================================
--- websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html (original)
+++ websites/production/camel/content/book-in-one-page.html Wed Aug  3 19:18:54 2016
@@ -3619,11 +3619,11 @@ The tutorial has been designed in two pa
 While not actual tutorials you might find working through the source of the various <a shape="rect" href="examples.html">Examples</a> useful.</li></ul>
 
 <h2 id="BookInOnePage-TutorialonSpringRemotingwithJMS">Tutorial on Spring Remoting with JMS</h2><p>&#160;</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">Thanks</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>This tutorial was kindly donated to Apache Camel by Martin Gilday.</p></div></div><h2 id="BookInOnePage-Preface">Preface</h2><p>This tutorial aims to guide the reader through the stages of creating a project which uses Camel to facilitate the routing of messages from a JMS queue to a <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://www.springramework.org" rel="nofollow">Spring</a> service. The route works in a synchronous fashion returning a response to the client.</p><p><style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
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-/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1470248322351">
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 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-TutorialonSpringRemotingwithJMS">Tutorial on Spring Remoting with JMS</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Preface">Preface</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Prerequisites">Prerequisites</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Distribution">Distribution</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-About">About</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-CreatetheCamelProject">Create the Camel Project</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-UpdatethePOMwithDependencies">Update the POM with Dependencies</a></li></ul>
 </li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-WritingtheServer">Writing the Server</a>
@@ -5738,11 +5738,11 @@ So we completed the last piece in the pi
 <p>This example has been removed from <strong>Camel 2.9</strong> onwards. Apache Axis 1.4 is a very old and unsupported framework. We encourage users to use <a shape="rect" href="cxf.html">CXF</a> instead of Axis.</p></div></div>
 
 <style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
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-/*]]>*/</style><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1470248323064">
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 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-TutorialusingAxis1.4withApacheCamel">Tutorial using Axis 1.4 with Apache Camel</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Prerequisites">Prerequisites</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Distribution">Distribution</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Introduction">Introduction</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-SettinguptheprojecttorunAxis">Setting up the project to run Axis</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Maven2">Maven 2</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-wsdl">wsdl</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-ConfiguringAxis">Configuring Axis</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-RunningtheExample">Running the Example</a></li></ul>
@@ -17167,11 +17167,11 @@ template.send(&quot;direct:alias-verify&
 ]]></script>
 </div></div><p></p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-SeeAlso.28">See Also</h3>
 <ul><li><a shape="rect" href="configuring-camel.html">Configuring Camel</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="component.html">Component</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="endpoint.html">Endpoint</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="getting-started.html">Getting Started</a></li></ul><ul><li><a shape="rect" href="crypto.html">Crypto</a> Crypto is also available as a <a shape="rect" href="data-format.html">Data Format</a></li></ul> <h2 id="BookInOnePage-CXFComponent">CXF Component</h2><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-note"><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-warning confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>When using CXF as a consumer, the <a shape="rect" href="cxf-bean-component.html">CXF Bean Component</a> allows you to factor out how message payloads are received from their processing as a RESTful or SOAP web service. This has the potential of using a multitude of transports to consume web 
 services. The bean component's configuration is also simpler and provides the fastest method to implement web services using Camel and CXF.</p></div></div><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-tip"><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-approve confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>When using CXF in streaming modes (see DataFormat option), then also read about <a shape="rect" href="stream-caching.html">Stream caching</a>.</p></div></div><p>The <strong>cxf:</strong> component provides integration with <a shape="rect" href="http://cxf.apache.org">Apache CXF</a> for connecting to JAX-WS services hosted in CXF.</p><p><style type="text/css">/*<![CDATA[*/
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-/*]]>*/</style></p><div class="toc-macro rbtoc1470248352884">
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 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-CXFComponent">CXF Component</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-URIformat">URI format</a></li><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Options">Options</a>
 <ul class="toc-indentation"><li><a shape="rect" href="#BookInOnePage-Thedescriptionsofthedataformats">The descriptions of the dataformats</a>
@@ -21506,7 +21506,7 @@ rnc:someLocalOrRemoteResource]]></script
 <script class="brush: text; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[2008-07-09 06:43:04,046 [main           ] DEBUG JmsBinding
   - Ignoring non primitive header: order of class: org.apache.camel.component.jms.issues.DummyOrder with value: DummyOrder{orderId=333, itemId=4444, quantity=2}
 ]]></script>
-</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Messageformatwhenreceiving">Message format when receiving</h3><p>Camel adds the following properties to the <code>Exchange</code> when it receives a message:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Property</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Type</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>org.apache.camel.jms.replyDestination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The reply destination.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>Camel adds the following JMS properties to the In message headers when it receives a JMS message:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><ta
 ble class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Header</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Type</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSCorrelationID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS correlation ID.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSDeliveryMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>int</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS delivery mode.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSDestination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflu
 enceTd"><p>The JMS destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSExpiration</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>long</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS expiration.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSMessageID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS unique message ID.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSPriority</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>int</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS priority (with 0 as the lowest priority and 9 as the highest).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSRedelivered</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflue
 nceTd"><p><code>boolean</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Is the JMS message redelivered.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS reply-to destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSTimestamp</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>long</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS timestamp.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS type.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSXGroupID</code></p></t
 d><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS group ID.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>As all the above information is standard JMS you can check the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://java.sun.com/javaee/5/docs/api/javax/jms/Message.html" rel="nofollow">JMS documentation</a> for further details.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-AboutusingCameltosendandreceivemessagesandJMSReplyTo">About using Camel to send and receive messages and JMSReplyTo</h3><p>The JMS component is complex and you have to pay close attention to how it works in some cases. So this is a short summary of some of the areas/pitfalls to look for.</p><p>When Camel sends a message using its <code>JMSProducer</code> it checks the following conditions:</p><ul class="alternate"><li><p>The message exchange pattern (MEP)</p></li><li><p>Whether a <strong><code>JMSReplyTo</code></strong> was set in the endpoint
  or in the message headers</p></li><li><p>Whether any of the following options have been set on the JMS endpoint: <strong><code>disableReplyTo</code>,&#160;<code>preserveMessageQos</code></strong> or <strong><code>explicitQosEnabled</code>.</strong></p></li></ul><p>All this can be a tad complex to understand and configure to support your use case.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-JmsProducer">JmsProducer</h4><p>The <code>JmsProducer</code> behaves as follows, depending on configuration:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Exchange Pattern</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Other options</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan=
 "1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will expect a reply, set a temporary <code>JMSReplyTo</code>, and after sending the message, it will start to listen for the reply message on the temporary queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code> is set</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will expect a reply and, after sending the message, it will start to listen for the reply message on the specified <code>JMSReplyTo</code> queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will send the message and <strong>not</strong> expect a reply.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" row
 span="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code> is set</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>By default, Camel discards the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> destination and clears the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> header before sending the message. Camel then sends the message and does <strong>not</strong> expect a reply. Camel logs this in the log at <code>WARN</code> level (changed to <code>DEBUG</code> level from <strong>Camel 2.6</strong> onward). You can use <code>preserveMessageQuo=true</code> to instruct Camel to keep the <code>JMSReplyTo</code>.</p><p>In all situations the <code>JmsProducer</code> does <strong>not</strong> expect any reply and thus continue after sending the message.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-JmsConsumer">JmsConsumer</h4><p>The <code>JmsConsumer</code> behaves as follows, depending on configuration:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th c
 olspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Exchange Pattern</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Other options</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will send the reply back to the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will not send a reply back, as the pattern is <em>InOnly</em>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>disableReplyTo=true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" r
 owspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>This option suppresses replies.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>So pay attention to the message exchange pattern set on your exchanges.</p><p>If you send a message to a JMS destination in the middle of your route you can specify the exchange pattern to use, see more at <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>. This is useful if you want to send an <code>InOnly</code> message to a JMS topic:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><h3 id="BookInOnePage-Messageformatwhenreceiving">Message format when receiving</h3><p>Camel adds the following properties to the <code>Exchange</code> when it receives a message:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Property</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Type</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>org.apache.camel.jms.replyDestination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The reply destination.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>Camel adds the following JMS properties to the In message headers when it receives a JMS message:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><ta
 ble class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Header</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Type</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSCorrelationID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS correlation ID.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSDeliveryMode</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>int</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS delivery mode.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSDestination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflu
 enceTd"><p>The JMS destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSExpiration</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>long</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS expiration.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSMessageID</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS unique message ID.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSPriority</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>int</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS priority (with 0 as the lowest priority and 9 as the highest).</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSRedelivered</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="conflue
 nceTd"><p><code>boolean</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Is the JMS message redelivered.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS reply-to destination.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSTimestamp</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>long</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS timestamp.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSType</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS type.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSXGroupID</code></p></t
 d><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>String</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>The JMS group ID.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>As all the above information is standard JMS you can check the <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://java.sun.com/javaee/5/docs/api/javax/jms/Message.html" rel="nofollow">JMS documentation</a> for further details.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-AboutusingCameltosendandreceivemessagesandJMSReplyTo">About using Camel to send and receive messages and JMSReplyTo</h3><p>The JMS component is complex and you have to pay close attention to how it works in some cases. So this is a short summary of some of the areas/pitfalls to look for.</p><p>When Camel sends a message using its <code>JMSProducer</code> it checks the following conditions:</p><ul class="alternate"><li><p>The message <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://camel.apache.org/exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> 
 (MEP)</p></li><li><p>Whether a <strong><code>JMSReplyTo</code></strong> was set in the endpoint or in the message headers</p></li><li><p>Whether any of the following options have been set on the JMS endpoint: <strong><code>disableReplyTo</code>,&#160;<code>preserveMessageQos</code></strong> or <strong><code>explicitQosEnabled</code>.</strong></p></li></ul><p>All this can be a tad complex to understand and configure to support your use case.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-JmsProducer">JmsProducer</h4><p>The <code>JmsProducer</code> behaves as follows, depending on configuration:</p><div class="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Exchange Pattern</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Other options</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td 
 colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will expect a reply, set a temporary <code>JMSReplyTo</code>, and after sending the message, it will start to listen for the reply message on the temporary queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code> is set</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will expect a reply and, after sending the message, it will start to listen for the reply message on the specified <code>JMSReplyTo</code> queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will send the message and <strong>not</strong> expect a reply.</p></td></tr><tr><td 
 colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>JMSReplyTo</code> is set</p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>By default, Camel discards the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> destination and clears the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> header before sending the message. Camel then sends the message and does <strong>not</strong> expect a reply. Camel logs this in the log at <code>WARN</code> level (changed to <code>DEBUG</code> level from <strong>Camel 2.6</strong> onward). You can use <code>preserveMessageQuo=true</code> to instruct Camel to keep the <code>JMSReplyTo</code>.</p><p>In all situations the <code>JmsProducer</code> does <strong>not</strong> expect any reply and thus continue after sending the message.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-JmsConsumer">JmsConsumer</h4><p>The <code>JmsConsumer</code> behaves as follows, depending on configuration:</p><div class
 ="confluenceTableSmall"><div class="table-wrap"><table class="confluenceTable"><tbody><tr><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Exchange Pattern</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Other options</p></th><th colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTh"><p>Description</p></th></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOut</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will send the reply back to the <code>JMSReplyTo</code> queue.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>InOnly</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>Camel will not send a reply back, as the pattern is <em>InOnly</em>.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>-</code></p></td><td colspan="1"
  rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p><code>disableReplyTo=true</code></p></td><td colspan="1" rowspan="1" class="confluenceTd"><p>This option suppresses replies.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></div></div><p>So pay attention to the message exchange pattern set on your exchanges.</p><p>If you send a message to a JMS destination in the middle of your route you can specify the exchange pattern to use, see more at <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>. This is useful if you want to send an <code>InOnly</code> message to a JMS topic:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[from(&quot;activemq:queue:in&quot;)
    .to(&quot;bean:validateOrder&quot;)
    .to(ExchangePattern.InOnly, &quot;activemq:topic:order&quot;)
@@ -21523,7 +21523,7 @@ rnc:someLocalOrRemoteResource]]></script
    exchange.getIn().setHeader(&quot;CamelJmsDestinationName&quot;, &quot;order:&quot; + id&quot;);
 }
 ]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Then Camel will read this header and use it as the destination instead of the one configured on the endpoint. So, in this example Camel sends the message to <code>activemq:queue:order:2</code>, assuming the <code>id</code> value was <code>2</code>.</p><p>If both the <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> and the <code>CamelJmsDestinationName</code> headers are set, <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> takes priority. Keep in mind that the JMS producer removes both <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> and <code>CamelJmsDestinationName</code> headers from the exchange and do not propagate them to the created JMS message<span class="entry">&#160;</span>in order to avoid the accidental loops in the routes (in scenarios when the message will be forwarded to the another JMS endpoint).</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-ConfiguringdifferentJMSproviders">Configuring different JMS providers</h3><p>You can configure your JMS provider in <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> XML as follows:</p>
 <div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p>Then Camel will read this header and use it as the destination instead of the one configured on the endpoint. So, in this example Camel sends the message to <code>activemq:queue:order:2</code>, assuming the <code>id</code> value was <code>2</code>.</p><p>If both the <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> and the <code>CamelJmsDestinationName</code> headers are set <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> will take priority. Note that the JMS producer removes both <code>CamelJmsDestination</code> and <code>CamelJmsDestinationName</code> headers from the exchange and does not propagate them to the created JMS message. This prevents accidental routing loops in scenarios where a message is forwarded to another JMS endpoint.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-ConfiguringdifferentJMSproviders">Configuring different JMS providers</h3><p>A JMS provider can be configured in <a shape="rect" href="spring.html">Spring</a> XML as follows:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div cla
 ss="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: xml; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[
 &lt;camelContext id=&quot;camel&quot; xmlns=&quot;http://camel.apache.org/schema/spring&quot;&gt;
     &lt;jmxAgent id=&quot;agent&quot; disabled=&quot;true&quot;/&gt;
@@ -21537,7 +21537,7 @@ rnc:someLocalOrRemoteResource]]></script
   &lt;/property&gt;
 &lt;/bean&gt;
 ]]></script>
-</div></div><p>&#160;</p><p>Basically, you can configure as many JMS component instances as you wish giving them each a <strong>unique name using the</strong>&#160;<code>id</code> <strong>attribute</strong>. The preceding example configures an activemq component. You could do the same to configure MQSeries, TibCo, BEA, Sonic and so on.</p><p>Once you have a named JMS component, you can then refer to endpoints within that component using URIs. For example for the component name, <code>activemq</code>, you can then refer to destinations using the URI format, <code>activemq:[queue:|topic:]destinationName</code>. You can use the same approach for all other JMS providers.</p><p>This works by the SpringCamelContext lazily fetching components from the spring context for the scheme name you use for <a shape="rect" href="endpoint.html">Endpoint</a> <a shape="rect" href="uris.html">URIs</a> and having the <a shape="rect" href="component.html">Component</a> resolve the endpoint URIs.</p><h4 id
 ="BookInOnePage-UsingJNDItofindtheConnectionFactory">Using JNDI to find the ConnectionFactory</h4><p>If you are using a J2EE container, you might need to look up JNDI to find the JMS <code>ConnectionFactory</code> rather than use the usual <code>&lt;bean&gt;</code> mechanism in Spring. You can do this using Spring's factory bean or the new Spring XML namespace. For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p>&#160;</p><p>An unlimited number of JMS component instance can be created provided each has a <strong>unique value for its&#160;</strong><code>id</code> <strong>attribute</strong>. The preceding example configures an activemq component. You could do the same to configure MQSeries, TibCo, BEA, Sonic etc.</p><p>Once named a JMS component can be referenced from an endpoint's URI. For example, given the component name <code>activemq</code> a URI can reference the component using the format <code>activemq:[queue:|topic:]destinationName</code>. The same approach applies to all JMS providers. This is achieved by the SpringCamelContext lazily fetching components from the spring context for the scheme name referenced in the <a shape="rect" href="endpoint.html">Endpoint</a> <a shape="rect" href="uris.html">URIs</a> then having the <a shape="rect" href="component.html">Component</a> resolve the endpoint URI itself.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-UsingJNDItofindtheConnectionFactory">Us
 ing JNDI to find the ConnectionFactory</h4><p>If you are using a J2EE container, you might need to look up JNDI to find the JMS <code>ConnectionFactory</code> rather than use the usual <code>&lt;bean&gt;</code> mechanism in Spring. You can do this using Spring's factory bean or the new Spring XML namespace. For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: xml; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[&lt;bean id=&quot;weblogic&quot; class=&quot;org.apache.camel.component.jms.JmsComponent&quot;&gt;
   &lt;property name=&quot;connectionFactory&quot; ref=&quot;myConnectionFactory&quot;/&gt;
 &lt;/bean&gt;
@@ -21598,7 +21598,7 @@ from(aaa)
   .setHeader(&quot;CamelJmsRequestTimeout&quot;, method(ServiceBean.class, &quot;whatIsTheTimeout&quot;))
   .to(&quot;jms:queue:foo?replyTo=bar&amp;requestTimeout=30s&quot;)
   .to(&quot;bean:processReply&quot;);]]></script>
-</div></div><p>When you do fire and forget (<code>InOut</code>) over <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> Camel will, by default, <strong>not</strong> set a time to live value on the message. The value can be configured using the <code>timeToLive</code> option. For example to indicate a 5 sec., you set <code>timeToLive=5000</code>. The option <code>disableTimeToLive</code> can be used to force disabling the time to live, also for&#160;<code>InOnly</code> messaging. The <code>requestTimeout</code> option is not being used for&#160;<code>InOnly</code> messaging.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-EnablingTransactedConsumption">Enabling Transacted Consumption</h3><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="BookInOnePage-transactedConsumption"></span></p><p>A common requirement is to consume from a queue in a transaction and then process the message using the Camel route. To do this, just ensure that you set the following properties on the component/endpoint:</p><ul><li><pre>transacted = true<
 /pre></li><li><p><code>transactionManager =</code> <em>&lt;SomeTransactionManager&gt;</em> (typically the JmsTransactionManager)</p></li></ul><p>See the <a shape="rect" href="transactional-client.html">Transactional Client</a> EIP pattern for further details.</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">Transactions and [Request Reply] over JMS</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>When using <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a> over JMS you cannot use a single transaction; JMS will not send any messages until a commit is performed, so the server side won't receive anything at all until the transaction commits. Therefore to use <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a> you must commit a transaction after sending the request and then use a separate transaction for receiving th
 e response.</p><p>To address this issue the JMS component uses different properties to specify transaction use for oneway messaging and request reply messaging:</p><ul><li><p>The <code>transacted</code> property applies <strong>only</strong> to the&#160;<code>InOnly</code> message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP).</p></li><li><p>The <code>transactedInOut</code> property applies to the&#160;<code>InOut</code> (<a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>) message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP). If you want to use transactions with the&#160;<code>InOut</code> (<a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>) message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP), you <strong>must</strong> set <code>transactedInOut=true</code>.</p></li></ul></div></div><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.10</strong></p><p>You can leverage the <a shape="rect" class="external
 -link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/AbstractPollingMessageListenerContainer.html#setSessionTransacted(boolean)" rel="nofollow">DMLC transacted session API</a> using the following properties on component/endpoint:</p><ul><li><p><code>transacted = true</code></p></li><li><p><code>lazyCreateTransactionManager = false</code></p></li></ul><p>The benefit of doing so is that the&#160;<code>cacheLevel</code> setting will be honored when using local transactions without a configured TransactionManager. When a TransactionManager is configured, no caching happens at DMLC level and its necessary to rely on a pooled connection factory. For more details about this kind of setup see <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://tmielke.blogspot.com/2012/03/camel-jms-with-transactions-lessons.html" rel="nofollow">here</a> and <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://forum.springsource.org/showthread.php?123631-JMS
 -DMLC-not-caching connection-when-using-TX-despite-cacheLevel-CACHE_CONSUMER&amp;p=403530&amp;posted=1#post403530" rel="nofollow">here</a>.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-UsingJMSReplyToforlatereplies">Using JMSReplyTo for late replies</h3><p>When using Camel as a JMS listener, it sets an Exchange property with the value of the ReplyTo <strong><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></strong> object, having the key <code>ReplyTo</code>. You can obtain this <code>Destination</code> as follows:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p>When you do fire and forget (<code>InOut</code>) over <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> Camel will, by default, <strong>not</strong> set a time to live value on the message. The value can be configured using the <code>timeToLive</code> option. For example to indicate a 5 sec., you set <code>timeToLive=5000</code>. The option <code>disableTimeToLive</code> can be used to force disabling the time to live, also for&#160;<code>InOnly</code> messaging. The <code>requestTimeout</code> option is not being used for&#160;<code>InOnly</code> messaging.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-EnablingTransactedConsumption">Enabling Transacted Consumption</h3><p><span class="confluence-anchor-link" id="BookInOnePage-transactedConsumption"></span></p><p>A common requirement is to consume from a queue in a transaction and then process the message using the Camel route. To do this, just ensure that you set the following properties on the component/endpoint:</p><ul><li><p><code>transacted = t
 rue</code></p></li><li><p><code>transactionManager =</code> <em>&lt;SomeTransactionManager&gt;</em> (typically the JmsTransactionManager)</p></li></ul><p>See the <a shape="rect" href="transactional-client.html">Transactional Client</a> EIP pattern for further details.</p><div class="confluence-information-macro confluence-information-macro-information"><p class="title">Transactions and [Request Reply] over JMS</p><span class="aui-icon aui-icon-small aui-iconfont-info confluence-information-macro-icon"></span><div class="confluence-information-macro-body"><p>When using <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a> over JMS you cannot use a single transaction; JMS will not send any messages until a commit is performed, so the server side won't receive anything at all until the transaction commits. Therefore to use <a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a> you must commit a transaction after sending the request and then use a separate transaction for rec
 eiving the response.</p><p>To address this issue the JMS component uses different properties to specify transaction use for oneway messaging and request reply messaging:</p><ul><li><p>The <code>transacted</code> property applies <strong>only</strong> to the&#160;<code>InOnly</code> message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP).</p></li><li><p>The <code>transactedInOut</code> property applies to the&#160;<code>InOut</code> (<a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>) message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP). If you want to use transactions with the&#160;<code>InOut</code> (<a shape="rect" href="request-reply.html">Request Reply</a>) message <a shape="rect" href="exchange-pattern.html">Exchange Pattern</a> (MEP), you <strong>must</strong> set <code>transactedInOut=true</code>.</p></li></ul></div></div><p><strong>Available as of Camel 2.10</strong></p><p>You can leverage the <a shape="rect" class=
 "external-link" href="http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/jms/listener/AbstractPollingMessageListenerContainer.html#setSessionTransacted(boolean)" rel="nofollow">DMLC transacted session API</a> using the following properties on component/endpoint:</p><ul><li><p><code>transacted = true</code></p></li><li><p><code>lazyCreateTransactionManager = false</code></p></li></ul><p>The benefit of doing so is that the&#160;<code>cacheLevel</code> setting will be honored when using local transactions without a configured TransactionManager. When a TransactionManager is configured, no caching happens at DMLC level and its necessary to rely on a pooled connection factory. For more details about this kind of setup see <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://tmielke.blogspot.com/2012/03/camel-jms-with-transactions-lessons.html" rel="nofollow">here</a> and <a shape="rect" class="external-link" href="http://forum.springsource.org/showthread.php?1
 23631-JMS-DMLC-not-caching connection-when-using-TX-despite-cacheLevel-CACHE_CONSUMER&amp;p=403530&amp;posted=1#post403530" rel="nofollow">here</a>.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-UsingJMSReplyToforlatereplies">Using JMSReplyTo for late replies</h3><p>When using Camel as a JMS listener, it sets an Exchange property with the value of the ReplyTo <strong><code>javax.jms.Destination</code></strong> object, having the key <code>ReplyTo</code>. You can obtain this <code>Destination</code> as follows:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[Destination replyDestination = exchange.getIn().getHeader(JmsConstants.JMS_REPLY_DESTINATION, Destination.class);
 ]]></script>
 </div></div><p>And then later use it to send a reply using regular JMS or Camel.</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
@@ -21607,7 +21607,7 @@ JmsEndpoint endpoint = JmsEndpoint.newIn
 
 // Now that we have the endpoint we can use regular Camel API to send a message to it
 template.sendBody(endpoint, &quot;Here is the late reply.&quot;);]]></script>
-</div></div><p>A different solution to sending a reply is to provide the <code>replyDestination</code> object in the same Exchange property when sending. Camel will then pick up this property and use it for the real destination. The endpoint URI must include a dummy destination, however. For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p>A different solution to sending a reply is to provide the <code>replyDestination</code> object in the same Exchange property when sending. Camel will then pick up this property and use it for the real destination. The endpoint URI must include a dummy destination, however.</p><p>For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[// we pretend to send it to some non existing dummy queue
 template.send(&quot;activemq:queue:dummy, new Processor() {
     public void process(Exchange exchange) throws Exception {
@@ -21644,7 +21644,7 @@ Object out = template.requestBody(&quot;
   &lt;/filter&gt;
 &lt;/route&gt;
 ]]></script>
-</div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Othersamples">Other samples</h4><p>JMS appears in many of the examples for other components and EIP patterns, as well in this Camel documentation. So feel free to browse the documentation. If you have time, check out the this tutorial that uses JMS but focuses on how well Spring Remoting and Camel works together <a shape="rect" href="tutorial-jmsremoting.html">Tutorial-JmsRemoting</a>.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-UsingJMSasaDeadLetterQueuestoringExchange">Using JMS as a Dead Letter Queue storing Exchange</h4><p>Normally, when using <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> as the transport, it only transfers the body and headers as the payload. If you want to use <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> with a <a shape="rect" href="dead-letter-channel.html">Dead Letter Channel</a>, using a JMS queue as the Dead Letter Queue, then normally the caused Exception is not stored in the JMS message. You can, however, use the <strong>transferExchange</strong> opt
 ion on the JMS dead letter queue to instruct Camel to store the entire <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> in the queue as a <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong> that holds a <strong><code>org.apache.camel.impl.DefaultExchangeHolder</code></strong>. This allows you to consume from the Dead Letter Queue and retrieve the caused exception from the Exchange property with the key <code>Exchange.EXCEPTION_CAUGHT</code>. The demo below illustrates this:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><h4 id="BookInOnePage-Othersamples">Other samples</h4><p>JMS appears in many of the examples for other components and EIP patterns, as well in this Camel documentation. So feel free to browse the documentation. If you have time, check out the this tutorial that uses JMS but focuses on how well Spring Remoting and Camel works together <a shape="rect" href="tutorial-jmsremoting.html">Tutorial-JmsRemoting</a>.</p><h4 id="BookInOnePage-UsingJMSasaDeadLetterQueuestoringExchange">Using JMS as a Dead Letter Queue storing Exchange</h4><p>Normally, when using <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> as the transport, it only transfers the body and headers as the payload. If you want to use <a shape="rect" href="jms.html">JMS</a> with a <a shape="rect" href="dead-letter-channel.html">Dead Letter Channel</a>, using a JMS queue as the Dead Letter Queue, then normally the caused Exception is not stored in the JMS message. You can, however, use the <strong><code>transferExchange</code>
 </strong> option on the JMS dead letter queue to instruct Camel to store the entire <a shape="rect" href="exchange.html">Exchange</a> in the queue as a <strong><code>javax.jms.ObjectMessage</code></strong> that holds a <strong><code>org.apache.camel.impl.DefaultExchangeHolder</code></strong>. This allows you to consume from the Dead Letter Queue and retrieve the caused exception from the Exchange property with the key <code>Exchange.EXCEPTION_CAUGHT</code>.</p><p>For example:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[// setup error handler to use JMS as queue and store the entire Exchange
 errorHandler(deadLetterChannel(&quot;jms:queue:dead?transferExchange=true&quot;));
 ]]></script>
@@ -21675,12 +21675,12 @@ from(&quot;seda:dead&quot;)
         exchange.getIn().setHeader(&quot;JMSReplyTo&quot;, &quot;bar&quot;);
     }
 });]]></script>
-</div></div><p><strong>Note</strong>: we use <code>preserveMessageQos=true</code> to instruct Camel to keep the&#160;<code>JMSReplyTo</code> header.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-SettingJMSprovideroptionsonthedestination">Setting JMS provider options on the destination</h3><p>Some JMS providers, like IBM's WebSphere MQ need options to be set on the JMS destination. For example, you may need to specify the targetClient option. Since targetClient is a WebSphere MQ option and not a Camel URI option, you need to set that on the JMS destination name like so:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p><strong>Note</strong>: we use <strong><code>preserveMessageQos=true</code></strong> to instruct Camel to keep the&#160;<code>JMSReplyTo</code> header.</p><h3 id="BookInOnePage-SettingJMSprovideroptionsonthedestination">Setting JMS provider options on the destination</h3><p>Some JMS providers, like IBM's WebSphere MQ need options to be set on the JMS destination. For example, you may need to specify the&#160;<strong><code>targetClient</code></strong> option. Since targetClient is a WebSphere MQ option and not a Camel URI option, you need to set that on the JMS destination name like so:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[...
 .setHeader(&quot;CamelJmsDestinationName&quot;, constant(&quot;queue:///MY_QUEUE?targetClient=1&quot;))
 .to(&quot;wmq:queue:MY_QUEUE?useMessageIDAsCorrelationID=true&quot;);
 ]]></script>
-</div></div><p>Some versions of WMQ won't accept this option on the destination name and you will get an exception like:</p><blockquote><p>com.ibm.msg.client.jms.DetailedJMSException: JMSCC0005: The specified value 'MY_QUEUE?targetClient=1' is not allowed for 'XMSC_DESTINATION_NAME'</p></blockquote><p>A workaround is to use a custom DestinationResolver:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
+</div></div><p>Some versions of Websphere MQ do not accept this option on the destination name. The following exception is raised when this happens:</p><blockquote><p><strong><code>com.ibm.msg.client.jms.DetailedJMSException: JMSCC0005: The specified value 'MY_QUEUE?targetClient=1' is not allowed for 'XMSC_DESTINATION_NAME'</code></strong></p></blockquote><p>A workaround is to use a custom DestinationResolver:</p><div class="code panel pdl" style="border-width: 1px;"><div class="codeContent panelContent pdl">
 <script class="brush: java; gutter: false; theme: Default" type="syntaxhighlighter"><![CDATA[JmsComponent wmq = new JmsComponent(connectionFactory);
 
 wmq.setDestinationResolver(new DestinationResolver(){

Modified: websites/production/camel/content/cache/main.pageCache
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