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From ste...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: ws-axis/java/docs user-guide.html
Date Thu, 14 Oct 2004 14:26:39 GMT
stevel      2004/10/14 07:26:39

  Modified:    java/docs user-guide.html
  Log:
  Update for 1.2.
  Note we need an endpoint with echo working, otherwise the tutorial is broken!
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.93      +224 -222  ws-axis/java/docs/user-guide.html
  
  Index: user-guide.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/ws-axis/java/docs/user-guide.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.92
  retrieving revision 1.93
  diff -u -r1.92 -r1.93
  --- user-guide.html	27 Mar 2004 12:35:46 -0000	1.92
  +++ user-guide.html	14 Oct 2004 14:26:38 -0000	1.93
  @@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
     <li> <a href="#Installation">Installing Axis</a></li>
     <li> <a href="#ConsumingServices">Consuming Web Services with Axis</a></li>
     <li> <a href="#PublishingServices">Publishing Web Services with Axis</a></li>
  -  <li> <a href="#DataMapping">XML &lt;-> Java Data Mapping in Axis</a></li>
  +  <li> <a href="#DataMapping">XML &lt;-&gt; Java Data Mapping in Axis</a></li>
     <li> <a href="#WSDL">Using WSDL with Axis</a></li>
     <ul>
       <li> <a href="#WSDL: Obtaining WSDL for deployed services">?WSDL: Obtaining 
  @@ -45,15 +45,18 @@
   Welcome to Axis, the third generation of Apache SOAP! 
   <h3>
   What is SOAP?</h3>
  +
  +<p>
   SOAP is an XML<i>-</i>based communication protocol and encoding format for inter-application 
   communication. Originally conceived by Microsoft and Userland software, it has 
  -evolved through several generations and the current spec, <a href="http://w3.org/TR/soap">SOAP 
  -1.1</a>, is fast growing in popularity and usage. The W3C's <a href="http://www.w3.org/2000/xp/Group/">XML 
  -Protocol working group</a> is in the process of turning SOAP into a true open 
  -standard, and as of this writing has released a working draft of SOAP 1.2, which 
  -cleans up some of the more confusing areas of the 1.1 spec. 
  +evolved through several generations; the current spec is version,
  +<a href="http://w3.org/TR/soap">SOAP 1.2</a>, though version1.1 is more
  +widespread. The W3C's <a href="http://www.w3.org/2000/xp/Group/">XML 
  +Protocol working group</a> is in charge of the specification. 
  +</p>
   <p>SOAP is widely viewed as the backbone to a new generation of cross-platform
   cross-language distributed computing applications, termed Web Services.
  +</p>
   <h3>
   What is Axis?</h3>
   Axis is essentially a <i>SOAP engine</i> -- a framework for
  @@ -154,16 +157,18 @@
   <p>Before running the examples in this guide, you'll need to make sure
   that your CLASSPATH includes 
   (Note: If you build Axis from a CVS checkout, 
  -these will be in xml-axis/java/build/lib instead of axis-1_1/lib):
  +these will be in xml-axis/java/build/lib instead of axis-1_2/lib):
   <ul>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/axis.jar</li>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/jaxrpc.jar</li>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/saaj.jar</li>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/commons-logging.jar</li>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/commons-discovery.jar</li>
  -<li>axis-1_1/lib/wsdl4j.jar</li>
  -  <li>axis-1_1/ <i><font color="#9966FF">(for the sample code)</font></i></li>
  -  <li>A JAXP-1.1 compliant XML parser such as Xerces or Crimson</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/axis.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/jaxrpc.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/saaj.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/commons-logging.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/commons-discovery.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/lib/wsdl4j.jar</li>
  +<li>axis-1_2/ <i><font color="#9966FF">(for the sample code)</font></i></li>
  +<li>A JAXP-1.1 compliant XML parser such as Xerces or Crimson. We recommend 
  +<A href="http://xml.apache.org/xerces2-j/">Xerces</A>, as it is the one
  +that the product has been tested against.</li>
   </ul>
   <h2>
   <a NAME="ConsumingServices"></a>Consuming Web Services with Axis</h2>
  @@ -172,30 +177,30 @@
   Basics - Getting Started</h3>
   Let's take a look at an example Web Service client that will call the <b>echoString</b>
   method on the public Axis server at Apache.
  -<pre class="example">1&nbsp;&nbsp; import org.apache.axis.client.Call;
  -2&nbsp;&nbsp; import org.apache.axis.client.Service;
  -3&nbsp;&nbsp; import javax.xml.namespace.QName;
  -4&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -5&nbsp;&nbsp; public class TestClient {
  -6&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public static void main(String [] args) {
  -7&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; try {
  -8&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; String endpoint =
  -9&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; "http://nagoya.apache.org:5049/axis/services/echo";
  -10&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -11&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Service&nbsp; service = new Service();
  -12&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Call&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; call&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = (Call) service.createCall();
  -13&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -14&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; call.setTargetEndpointAddress( new java.net.URL(endpoint) );
  -15&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; call.setOperationName(new QName("<font color="#009933">http://soapinterop.org/</font>", "<font color="#993333">echoString</font>"));
  -16&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -17&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; String ret = (String) call.invoke( new Object[] { "<font color="#CC00CC">Hello!</font>" } );
  -18&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -19&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; System.out.println("Sent 'Hello!', got '" + ret + "'");
  -20&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; } catch (Exception e) {
  -21&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; System.err.println(e.toString());
  -22&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  -23&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  -24&nbsp; }</pre>
  +<pre class="example">1   import org.apache.axis.client.Call;
  +2   import org.apache.axis.client.Service;
  +3   import javax.xml.namespace.QName;
  +4   
  +5   public class TestClient {
  +6      public static void main(String [] args) {
  +7          try {
  +8              String endpoint =
  +9                       "http://nagoya.apache.org:5049/axis/services/echo";
  +10  
  +11             Service  service = new Service();
  +12             Call     call    = (Call) service.createCall();
  +13  
  +14             call.setTargetEndpointAddress( new java.net.URL(endpoint) );
  +15             call.setOperationName(new QName("<font color="#009933">http://soapinterop.org/</font>", "<font color="#993333">echoString</font>"));
  +16  
  +17             String ret = (String) call.invoke( new Object[] { "<font color="#CC00CC">Hello!</font>" } );
  +18  
  +19             System.out.println("Sent 'Hello!', got '" + ret + "'");
  +20         } catch (Exception e) {
  +21             System.err.println(e.toString());
  +22         }
  +23     }
  +24  }</pre>
   (You'll find this file in <a href="../samples/userguide/example1/TestClient.java">samples/userguide/example1/TestClient.java</a>)
   <p>Assuming you have a network connection active, this program can be run
   as follows:
  @@ -214,13 +219,13 @@
     values in the call above): 
   <pre class="xml">&lt;?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
   &lt;SOAP-ENV:Envelope xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:SOAP-ENV="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  -&nbsp; &lt;SOAP-ENV:Body>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;ns1:<b><font color="#993333">echoString</font></b> xmlns:ns1="<b><font color="#009933">http://soapinterop.org/</font></b>">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;arg0 xsi:type="xsd:string"><b><font color="#CC00CC">Hello!</font></b>&lt;/arg0>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;/ns1:echoString>
  -&nbsp; &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Body>
  +                   xmlns:SOAP-ENV="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
  +                   xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  +  &lt;SOAP-ENV:Body>
  +    &lt;ns1:<b><font color="#993333">echoString</font></b> xmlns:ns1="<b><font color="#009933">http://soapinterop.org/</font></b>">
  +      &lt;arg0 xsi:type="xsd:string"><b><font color="#CC00CC">Hello!</font></b>&lt;/arg0>
  +    &lt;/ns1:echoString>
  +  &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Body>
   &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Envelope></pre>
   <p>The String argument is automatically serialized into XML, and the server
   responds with an identical String, which we deserialize and print.</p>
  @@ -232,10 +237,10 @@
   arguments in the SOAP message "arg0", "arg1", etc. (In this case there's just 
   &quot;arg0&quot;) If you want to change this, it's easy! Before calling <tt>invoke()</tt> 
   you need to call <tt>addParameter</tt> for each parameter and <tt>setReturnType</tt> for the return, like so: 
  -<pre class="example">&nbsp; call.addParameter("testParam",&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING,
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; javax.xml.rpc.ParameterMode.IN);
  -&nbsp; call.setReturnType(org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING);&nbsp;</pre>
  +<pre class="example">  call.addParameter("testParam", 
  +                    org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING,
  +                    javax.xml.rpc.ParameterMode.IN);
  +  call.setReturnType(org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING); </pre>
   This will assign the name <b>testParam</b> to the 1st (and only) parameter
   on the invoke call. This will also define the type of the parameter (<tt>org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING</tt>)
   and whether it is an input, output or inout parameter - in this case its
  @@ -243,13 +248,13 @@
   looks like this:
   <pre class="xml">&lt;?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
   &lt;SOAP-ENV:Envelope xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:SOAP-ENV="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  -&nbsp; &lt;SOAP-ENV:Body>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;ns1:echoString xmlns:ns1="http://soapinterop.org/">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;<font color="#CC00CC">testParam</font> xsi:type="xsd:string">Hello!&lt;/<font color="#CC00CC">testParam</font>>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;/ns1:echoString>
  -&nbsp; &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Body>
  +                   xmlns:SOAP-ENV="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
  +                   xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  +  &lt;SOAP-ENV:Body>
  +    &lt;ns1:echoString xmlns:ns1="http://soapinterop.org/">
  +      &lt;<font color="#CC00CC">testParam</font> xsi:type="xsd:string">Hello!&lt;/<font color="#CC00CC">testParam</font>>
  +    &lt;/ns1:echoString>
  +  &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Body>
   &lt;/SOAP-ENV:Envelope></pre>
   Note that the param is now named "testParam" as expected.
   <h3>Interoperating with "untyped" servers</h3>
  @@ -290,7 +295,7 @@
   - data about data. In this case, we need a <b>description</b> of the service
   that tells us what to expect as the return type. Here's how to do it on
   the client side in Axis:</p>
  -<pre class="example">&nbsp; call.setReturnType( org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING );</pre>
  +<pre class="example">  call.setReturnType( org.apache.axis.Constants.XSD_STRING );</pre>
   <p>This method will tell the Axis client that if the return element is not typed 
     then it should act as if the return value has an xsi:type attribute set to the 
     predefined SOAP String type. (You can see an example of this in action in the 
  @@ -304,15 +309,15 @@
   <a NAME="PublishingServices"></a>Publishing Web Services with Axis</h2>
   Let's say we have a simple class like the following:
   <pre class="example">public class Calculator {
  -&nbsp; public int add(int i1, int i2)
  -&nbsp; {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; return i1 + i2;&nbsp;
  -&nbsp; }
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;
  -&nbsp; public int subtract(int i1, int i2)
  -&nbsp; {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; return i1 - i2;
  -&nbsp; }
  +  public int add(int i1, int i2)
  +  {
  +    return i1 + i2; 
  +  }
  +  
  +  public int subtract(int i1, int i2)
  +  {
  +    return i1 - i2;
  +  }
   }</pre>
   (You'll find this very class in <a href="../samples/userguide/example2/Calculator.java">samples/userguide/example2/Calculator.java</a>.)
   <p>How do we go about making this class available via SOAP? There are a
  @@ -365,11 +370,11 @@
   thing to deploy is a Web Service, so let's start by taking a look at a
   deployment descriptor for a basic service (this file is <a href="../samples/userguide/example3/deploy.wsdd">samples/userguide/example3/deploy.wsdd</a>):</p>
   <pre class="example">&lt;deployment xmlns="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
  -&nbsp;&lt;service name="MyService" provider="java:RPC">
  -&nbsp; &lt;parameter name="className" value="samples.userguide.example3.MyService"/>
  -&nbsp; &lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  -&nbsp;&lt;/service>
  +            xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
  + &lt;service name="MyService" provider="java:RPC">
  +  &lt;parameter name="className" value="samples.userguide.example3.MyService"/>
  +  &lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  + &lt;/service>
   &lt;/deployment></pre>
   Pretty simple, really - the outermost element tells the engine that this is a 
   WSDD deployment, and defines the "java" namespace. Then the service element actually 
  @@ -418,9 +423,9 @@
   You typed : test me!
   %</pre>
   If you want to prove to yourself that the deployment really worked, try
  -undeploying the service and calling it again.&nbsp; There's an "undeploy.wsdd"
  +undeploying the service and calling it again. There's an "undeploy.wsdd"
   file in the example3/ directory which you can use just as you did the deploy.wsdd
  -file above.&nbsp; Run the AdminClient on that file, then try the service
  +file above.  Run the AdminClient on that file, then try the service
   Client again and see what happens.
   <p>You can also use the AdminClient to get a listing of all the deployed
   components in the server:
  @@ -438,21 +443,21 @@
   the Handler itself, and then use the name that you give it in deploying
   a service. Here's a sample deploy.wsdd file (this is example 4 in samples/userguide):
   <pre class="example">&lt;deployment xmlns="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;!-- define the logging handler configuration -->
  -&nbsp;&lt;handler name="track" type="java:samples.userguide.example4.LogHandler">
  -&nbsp; &lt;parameter name="filename" value="MyService.log"/>
  -&nbsp;&lt;/handler>
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&lt;!-- define the service, using the log handler we just defined -->
  -&nbsp;&lt;service name="LogTestService"<b> </b>provider="java:RPC">
  -&nbsp; &lt;requestFlow>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;handler type="track"/>
  -&nbsp; &lt;/requestFlow>
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp; &lt;parameter name="className" value="samples.userguide.example4.Service"/>
  -&nbsp; &lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  -&nbsp;&lt;/service>
  +            xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
  +  &lt;!-- define the logging handler configuration -->
  + &lt;handler name="track" type="java:samples.userguide.example4.LogHandler">
  +  &lt;parameter name="filename" value="MyService.log"/>
  + &lt;/handler>
  + 
  + &lt;!-- define the service, using the log handler we just defined -->
  + &lt;service name="LogTestService"<b> </b>provider="java:RPC">
  +  &lt;requestFlow>
  +   &lt;handler type="track"/>
  +  &lt;/requestFlow>
  + 
  +  &lt;parameter name="className" value="samples.userguide.example4.Service"/>
  +  &lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  + &lt;/service>
   &lt;/deployment></pre>
   <p>The first section defines a Handler called "track" that is implemented
   by the class samples.userguide.example4.LogHandler. We give this Handler
  @@ -472,9 +477,9 @@
   webapp's WEB-INF directory. In it, you'll see a deployment for the AdminService.
   Add an option as follows:
   <pre class="xml">&lt;service name="AdminService" provider="java:MSG">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;parameter name="className" value="org.apache.axis.util.Admin"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;<b>&lt;parameter name="enableRemoteAdmin" value="true"/>
  +  &lt;parameter name="className" value="org.apache.axis.util.Admin"/>
  +  &lt;parameter name="allowedMethods" value="*"/>
  +  <b>&lt;parameter name="enableRemoteAdmin" value="true"/>
   </b>&lt;/service></pre>
   <p><b>WARNING: enabling remote administration may give unauthorized parties
   access to your machine. If you do this, please make sure to add security
  @@ -511,7 +516,7 @@
   <p>A good place to start in describing the difference between document and wrapped 
     services is with a sample SOAP message containing a purchase order:</p>
   <pre class="xml">&lt;soap:Envelope xmlns="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
  +            xmlns:java="http://xml.apache.org/axis/wsdd/providers/java">
     &lt;soap:Body&gt;
       &lt;myNS:PurchaseOrder xmlns:myNS=&quot;http://commerce.com/PO&quot;&gt;
         &lt;item&gt;SK001&lt;/item&gt;
  @@ -701,17 +706,6 @@
   
   <h3>What Axis can send via SOAP with restricted Interoperability</h3>
   
  -<h5>Unsigned data</h5>
  -
  -You cannot consume or generate services that use unsigned datatypes with
  -pure JAX-RPC, because there are no unsigned dataypes in Java. 
  -<p>
  -Axis does have support for the unsigned types, so you can consume services
  -written in C++, C# and the like, and re-implement interfaces designed for 
  -those languages. Be very wary about exporting unsigned datatypes, however, as to
  -do so will stop Java clients that do not use Axis or another SOAP client library 
  -with unsigned support from using them. The current JAX-RPC specification does 
  -not address this issue.
   
   <h5>Java Collections</h5>
   
  @@ -739,7 +733,7 @@
   serialization support built in to Axis.
   
   
  -Remote References
  +<h5>Remote References</h5>
   
   Remote references are neither part of the SOAP specification, nor the JAX-RPC
   specification. You cannot return some object reference and expect the
  @@ -755,7 +749,7 @@
   of get/set accessors. All you need to do is tell Axis which Java classes
   map to which XML Schema types. Configuring a bean mapping looks like this:
   <pre class="xml">&lt;beanMapping qname="ns:local" xmlns:ns="someNamespace"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; languageSpecificType="java:my.java.thingy"/></pre>
  +             languageSpecificType="java:my.java.thingy"/></pre>
   The &lt;beanMapping> tag maps a Java class (presumably a bean) to an XML
   QName. You'll note that it has two important attributes, <b>qname</b> and
   <b>languageSpecificType</b>.
  @@ -804,10 +798,10 @@
   Axis which types they should be used for. You do this with a typeMapping
   tag in WSDD, which looks like this:
   <pre class="xml">&lt;typeMapping qname="ns:local" xmlns:ns="someNamespace"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; languageSpecificType="java:my.java.thingy"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; serializer="my.java.Serializer"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; deserializer="my.java.DeserializerFactory"
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; encodingStyle="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/"/></pre>
  +             languageSpecificType="java:my.java.thingy"
  +             serializer="my.java.Serializer"
  +             deserializer="my.java.DeserializerFactory"
  +             encodingStyle="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/"/></pre>
   <p>This looks a lot like the &lt;beanMapping> tag we saw earlier, but there
   are three extra attributes. One, <b>serializer</b>, is the Java class name
   of the Serializer <i>factory</i> which gets the serializer to 
  @@ -863,8 +857,8 @@
   able to use it to access your service with toolkits like .NET, SOAP::Lite,
   or any other software which supports using WSDL.
   <p>You can also generate WSDL files from existing Java classes (see <a href="#Java2WSDL: Building WSDL from Java">Java2WSDL:
  -Building WSDL from Java</a>&nbsp;).
  -<br>&nbsp;
  +Building WSDL from Java</a> ).
  +<br> 
   <h3><a NAME="WSDL2Java: Building stubs, skeletons, and data"></a>WSDL2Java:
   Building stubs, skeletons, and data types from WSDL</h3>
   
  @@ -875,15 +869,15 @@
   % java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java (WSDL-file-URL)
   </pre>
   
  -<p>This will generate only those bindings necessary for the client.&nbsp;
  +<p>This will generate only those bindings necessary for the client. 
   Axis follows the JAX-RPC specification when generating Java client bindings
  -from WSDL.&nbsp; For this discussion, assume we executed the following:</p>
  +from WSDL.  For this discussion, assume we executed the following:</p>
   <pre class="example">
   % cd samples/addr
   % java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java AddressBook.wsdl
   </pre>
  -<p>The generated files will reside in the directory "AddressFetcher2".&nbsp;
  -They are put here because that is the target namespace from the WSDL and namespaces map to Java packages.&nbsp;
  +<p>The generated files will reside in the directory "AddressFetcher2". 
  +They are put here because that is the target namespace from the WSDL and namespaces map to Java packages. 
   Namespaces will be discussed in detail later.</p>
   <table BORDER COLS=2 WIDTH="100%" >
   <tr>
  @@ -933,31 +927,31 @@
   action with an Ant based build process.
   
   <h4>Types</h4>
  -<p>The Java class generated from a WSDL type will be named from the WSDL type.&nbsp;
  -This class will typically, though not always, be a bean.&nbsp; For example,
  +<p>The Java class generated from a WSDL type will be named from the WSDL type. 
  +This class will typically, though not always, be a bean.  For example,
   given the WSDL (the WSDL used throughout the WSDL2Java discussion is from
   the <a href="../samples/addr/AddressBook.wsdl">Address Book sample</a>):</p>
   <pre class="example">
   &lt;xsd:complexType name="phone">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;xsd:all>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;xsd:element name="areaCode" type="xsd:int"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;xsd:element name="exchange" type="xsd:string"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;xsd:element name="number" type="xsd:string"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;/xsd:all>
  +  &lt;xsd:all>
  +    &lt;xsd:element name="areaCode" type="xsd:int"/>
  +    &lt;xsd:element name="exchange" type="xsd:string"/>
  +    &lt;xsd:element name="number" type="xsd:string"/>
  +  &lt;/xsd:all>
   &lt;/xsd:complexType>
   </pre>
   <p>WSDL2Java will generate:
   <pre class="example">
   public class Phone implements java.io.Serializable {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public Phone() {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public int getAreaCode() {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public void setAreaCode(int areaCode) {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public java.lang.String getExchange() {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public void setExchange(java.lang.String exchange) {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public java.lang.String getNumber() {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public void setNumber(java.lang.String number) {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public boolean equals(Object obj) {...}
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;public int hashCode() {...}
  +    public Phone() {...}
  +    public int getAreaCode() {...}
  +    public void setAreaCode(int areaCode) {...}
  +    public java.lang.String getExchange() {...}
  +    public void setExchange(java.lang.String exchange) {...}
  +    public java.lang.String getNumber() {...}
  +    public void setNumber(java.lang.String number) {...}
  +    public boolean equals(Object obj) {...}
  +    public int hashCode() {...}
   }
   </pre>
   <h4>Mapping XML to Java types : Metadata</h4>
  @@ -982,10 +976,10 @@
     class in the Axis source, or generate your own bean from XML which uses attributes 
     or names which would be illegal in Java.</p>
   <h4>Holders</h4>
  -<p>This type may be used as an inout or out parameter.&nbsp; Java does not
  -have the concept of inout/out parameters.&nbsp; In order to achieve this
  -behavior, JAX-RPC specifies the use of holder classes.&nbsp; A holder class
  -is simply a class that contains an instance of its type.&nbsp; For example,
  +<p>This type may be used as an inout or out parameter. Java does not
  +have the concept of inout/out parameters.  In order to achieve this
  +behavior, JAX-RPC specifies the use of holder classes.  A holder class
  +is simply a class that contains an instance of its type.  For example,
   the holder for the Phone class would be:</p>
   <pre class="example">
   package samples.addr.holders;
  @@ -1007,18 +1001,18 @@
   <p>The holder classes for the primitive types can be found in javax.xml.rpc.holders.</p>
   <h4>PortTypes</h4>
   <p>The Service Definition Interface (SDI) is the interface that's derived
  -from a WSDL's portType.&nbsp; This is the interface you use to access the
  -operations on the service.&nbsp; For example, given the WSDL:</p>
  +from a WSDL's portType.  This is the interface you use to access the
  +operations on the service.  For example, given the WSDL:</p>
   <pre class="example">
   &lt;message name="empty">
   &lt;message name="AddEntryRequest">
  -&nbsp; &lt;part name="name" type="xsd:string"/>
  -&nbsp; &lt;part name="address" type="typens:address"/>
  +  &lt;part name="name" type="xsd:string"/>
  +  &lt;part name="address" type="typens:address"/>
   &lt;/message>
   &lt;portType name="AddressBook">
  -&nbsp; &lt;operation name="addEntry">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;input message="tns:AddEntryRequest"/>
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;output message="tns:empty"/>
  +  &lt;operation name="addEntry">
  +    &lt;input message="tns:AddEntryRequest"/>
  +    &lt;output message="tns:empty"/>
     &lt;/operation>
   &lt;/portType>
   </pre>
  @@ -1054,12 +1048,13 @@
   document/literal changes what the interface looks like, and we could 
   have more than one binding referring to a single portType, we have to 
   create more than one interface, and each interface must have a unique name.
  -<br>&nbsp;
  +
   <h4>
   Bindings</h4>
  -A Stub class implements the SDI.&nbsp; Its name is the binding name with
  -the suffix "Stub".&nbsp; It contains the code which turns the method invocations
  -into SOAP calls using the Axis Service and Call objects.&nbsp; It stands
  +
  +A Stub class implements the SDI.  Its name is the binding name with
  +the suffix "Stub".  It contains the code which turns the method invocations
  +into SOAP calls using the Axis Service and Call objects.  It stands
   in as a <b>proxy</b> (another term for the same idea) for the remote service,
   letting you call it exactly as if it were a local object. In other words,
   you don't need to deal with the endpoint URL, namespace, or parameter arrays
  @@ -1067,49 +1062,49 @@
   The stub hides all that work for you.
   <p>Given the following WSDL snippet:
   <pre class="example">&lt;binding name="AddressBookSOAPBinding" type="tns:AddressBook">
  -&nbsp; ...
  +  ...
   &lt;/binding></pre>
   <p>WSDL2Java will generate:
   <pre class="example">public class AddressBookSOAPBindingStub extends org.apache.axis.client.Stub
                                           implements AddressBook {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub() throws org.apache.axis.AxisFault
  +    public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub() throws org.apache.axis.AxisFault
       {...}
   
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub(URL endpointURL, 
  +    public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub(URL endpointURL, 
                                         javax.xml.rpc.Service service)
           throws org.apache.axis.AxisFault
       {...}
  -<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub(javax.xml.rpc.Service service)
  +<br>    public AddressBookSOAPBindingStub(javax.xml.rpc.Service service)
           throws org.apache.axis.AxisFault
       {...}
  -<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public void addEntry(String name, Address address) throws RemoteException
  +<br>    public void addEntry(String name, Address address) throws RemoteException
       {...}<br>}</pre>
   <h4>
   Services</h4>
  -Normally, a client program would not instantiate a stub directly.&nbsp;
  +Normally, a client program would not instantiate a stub directly. 
   It would instead instantiate a service locator and call a get method which
  -returns a stub.&nbsp; This locator is derived from the service clause in
  -the WSDL.&nbsp; WSDL2Java generates two objects from a service clause.&nbsp;
  +returns a stub.  This locator is derived from the service clause in
  +the WSDL.  WSDL2Java generates two objects from a service clause. 
   For example, given the WSDL:
   <pre class="example">&lt;service name="AddressBookService">
  -&nbsp; &lt;port name="AddressBook" binding="tns:AddressBookSOAPBinding">
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &lt;soap:address location="http://localhost:8080/axis/services/AddressBook"/>
  -&nbsp; &lt;/port>
  +  &lt;port name="AddressBook" binding="tns:AddressBookSOAPBinding">
  +    &lt;soap:address location="http://localhost:8080/axis/services/AddressBook"/>
  +  &lt;/port>
   &lt;/service></pre>
   <p>WSDL2Java will generate the service interface:
   <pre class="example">public interface AddressBookService extends javax.xml.rpc.Service {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public String getAddressBookAddress();
  -<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBook getAddressBook() throws javax.xml.rpc.ServiceException;
  -<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBook getAddressBook(URL portAddress) throws javax.xml.rpc.ServiceException;
  +    public String getAddressBookAddress();
  +<br>    public AddressBook getAddressBook() throws javax.xml.rpc.ServiceException;
  +<br>    public AddressBook getAddressBook(URL portAddress) throws javax.xml.rpc.ServiceException;
   }</pre>
   <p>WSDL2Java will also generate the locator which implements this interface:
   <pre class="example">public class AddressBookServiceLocator extends org.apache.axis.client.Service
                                          implements AddressBookService {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ...
  +    ...
   }</pre>
   <p>The service interface defines a get method for each port listed in the
   service element of the WSDL. The locator is the implementation of this
  -service interface.&nbsp; It implements these get methods. It serves as
  +service interface.  It implements these get methods. It serves as
   a locator for obtaining Stub instances. The Service class will by default
   make a Stub which points to the endpoint URL described in the WSDL file,
   but you may also specify a different URL when you ask for the PortType.
  @@ -1117,30 +1112,30 @@
   
   <pre class="example">public class Tester
   {
  -  &nbsp; public static void main(String [] args) throws Exception {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;    &nbsp; // Make a service
  -    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; AddressBookService service = new AddressBookServiceLocator();
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;     // Now use the service to get a stub which implements the SDI.
  -    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; AddressBook port = service.getAddressBook();
  -&nbsp;
  -    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; // Make the actual call
  -    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Address address = new Address(...);
  -    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; port.addEntry("Russell Butek", address);
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }<br>}</pre>
  +    public static void main(String [] args) throws Exception {
  +        // Make a service
  +        AddressBookService service = new AddressBookServiceLocator();
  + 
  +        // Now use the service to get a stub which implements the SDI.
  +        AddressBook port = service.getAddressBook();
  + 
  +        // Make the actual call
  +        Address address = new Address(...);
  +        port.addEntry("Russell Butek", address);
  +    }<br>}</pre>
   
   <h4>
   Server-side bindings</h4>
   Just as a stub is the client side of a Web Service represented in Java,
  -a <b>skeleton</b> is a Java framework for the server side.&nbsp; To make
  +a <b>skeleton</b> is a Java framework for the server side.  To make
   skeleton classes, you just specify the "--server-side --skeletonDeploy true" options
   to WSDL2Java.
   For instance, using the AddressBook.wsdl as we had above:
   <pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java --server-side --skeletonDeploy true AddressBook.wsdl</pre>
   <p>You will see that WSDL2Java generates all the classes that were generated
   before for the client, but it generates a few new files:
  -<br>&nbsp;
  -<br>&nbsp;
  +<br> 
  +<br> 
   <table BORDER COLS=2 WIDTH="100%" >
   <tr>
   <td><b>WSDL clause</b></td>
  @@ -1181,8 +1176,8 @@
   Here is how you run WSDL2Java to deploy directly to the implementation:
   <pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java --server-side AddressBook.wsdl</pre>
   <p>And here are the server side files that are generated:
  -<br>&nbsp;
  -<br>&nbsp;
  +<br> 
  +<br> 
   <table BORDER COLS=2 WIDTH="100%" >
   <tr>
   <td><b>WSDL clause</b></td>
  @@ -1214,32 +1209,32 @@
   <h5>
   Skeleton Description (for Skeleton Deployment) </h5>
   The skeleton class is the class that sits between the Axis engine and the
  -actual service implementation.&nbsp; Its name is the binding name with
  -suffix "Skeleton".&nbsp; For example, for the AddressBook binding, WSDL2Java
  +actual service implementation.  Its name is the binding name with
  +suffix "Skeleton".  For example, for the AddressBook binding, WSDL2Java
   will generate:
   <pre class="example">public class AddressBookSOAPBindingSkeleton implements AddressBook,
  -                                                   &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; org.apache.axis.wsdl.Skeleton {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; private AddressBook impl;
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBookSOAPBindingSkeleton() {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; this.impl = new AddressBookSOAPBindingImpl();
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public AddressBookSOAPBindingSkeleton(AddressBook impl) {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; this.impl = impl;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  -&nbsp;
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public void addEntry(java.lang.String name, Address address)
  +                                                       org.apache.axis.wsdl.Skeleton {
  +    private AddressBook impl;
  + 
  +    public AddressBookSOAPBindingSkeleton() {
  +        this.impl = new AddressBookSOAPBindingImpl();
  +    }
  + 
  +    public AddressBookSOAPBindingSkeleton(AddressBook impl) {
  +        this.impl = impl;
  +    }
  + 
  +    public void addEntry(java.lang.String name, Address address)
           throws java.rmi.RemoteException
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; impl.addEntry(name, address);
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  +    {
  +        impl.addEntry(name, address);
  +    }
   }</pre>
  -<p>(The real skeleton is actually much richer.&nbsp; For brevity we just show 
  +<p>(The real skeleton is actually much richer.  For brevity we just show 
     you the basic skeleton.) 
  -<p>The skeleton contains an implementation of the AddressBook service.&nbsp;
  +<p>The skeleton contains an implementation of the AddressBook service. 
   This implementation is either passed into the skeleton on construction,
  -or an instance of the generated implementation is created.&nbsp; When the
  +or an instance of the generated implementation is created.  When the
   Axis engine calls the skeleton's addEntry method, it simply delegates the
   invocation to the real implementation's addEntry method.
   <h5>
  @@ -1247,15 +1242,15 @@
   <p>WSDL2Java also generates an implementation template
   from the binding:
   <pre class="example">public class AddressBookSOAPBindingImpl implements AddressBook {
  -<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public void addEntry(String name, Address address)
  +<br>    public void addEntry(String name, Address address)
           throws java.rmi.RemoteException {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; }
  +    }
   }</pre>
   <p>This template could actually be used as a test implementation but, as
  -you can see, it doesn't do anything.&nbsp; It is intended that the service
  +you can see, it doesn't do anything.  It is intended that the service
   writer fill out the implementation from this template.</p>
   <p>When WSDL2Java is asked to generate the implementation template (via the --server-side 
  -  flag), it will ONLY generate it if it does not already exist.&nbsp; If this 
  +  flag), it will ONLY generate it if it does not already exist.  If this 
     implementation already exists, it will not be overwritten.</p>
   <h4>Services</h4>
   <p>The tool also builds you a "deploy.wsdd" and an "undeploy.wsdd" for each
  @@ -1264,20 +1259,23 @@
   compiled the code, and made the classes available to your Axis engine.</p>
   <h3><a NAME="Java2WSDL: Building WSDL from Java"></a>Java2WSDL: Building WSDL
   from Java</h3>
  -The Java2WSDL and WSDL2Java emitters make it easy to develop a new web service.  The following sections describe the steps in building a web service from a Java interface.
  -<br>&nbsp;
  +The Java2WSDL and WSDL2Java emitters make it easy to develop a new web service.  
  +The following sections describe the steps in building a web service from a Java interface.
  +<br> 
   <h4>
   Step 1: Provide a Java interface or class</h4>
   Write and compile a Java interface (or class) that describes the web service
  -interface.&nbsp; Here is an example interface that describes a web services
  -that can be used to set/query the price of widgets (<a href="../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPrice.java">samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPrice.java</a>):
  +interface.  Here is an example interface that describes a web services
  +that can be used to set/query the price of widgets 
  +(<a href="../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPrice.java">samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPrice.java</a>):
   <pre class="example">package samples.userguide.example6;
  -<br>/**
  -&nbsp;* Interface describing a web service to set and get Widget prices.
  -&nbsp;**/
  +
  +/**
  + * Interface describing a web service to set and get Widget prices.
  + **/
   public interface WidgetPrice {
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public void setWidgetPrice(String widgetName, String price);
  -&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; public String getWidgetPrice(String widgetName);
  +    public void setWidgetPrice(String widgetName, String price);
  +    public String getWidgetPrice(String widgetName);
   }</pre>
   <p><b>Note: </b>If you compile your class with debug information, Java2WSDL
   will use the debug information to obtain the method parameter names.
  @@ -1285,8 +1283,10 @@
   Step 2: Create WSDL using Java2WSDL</h4>
   Use the Java2WSDL tool to create a WSDL file from the interface above.
   <p>Here is an example invocation that produces the wsdl file (<tt>wp.wsdl</tt>)
  -from the interface described in the previous section:
  -<pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.Java2WSDL -o wp.wsdl&nbsp; -l"http://localhost:8080/axis/services/WidgetPrice" -n&nbsp; "urn:Example6"&nbsp;-p"samples.userguide.example6" "urn:Example6"&nbsp; samples.userguide.example6.WidgetPrice</pre>
  +from the interface described in the previous section (entered all on one line):
  +<pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.Java2WSDL -o wp.wsdl  
  +    -l"http://localhost:8080/axis/services/WidgetPrice" -n  "urn:Example6" 
  +    -p"samples.userguide.example6" "urn:Example6"  samples.userguide.example6.WidgetPrice</pre>
   <p>Where:
   <ul>
   <li>
  @@ -1299,7 +1299,7 @@
   -n is the target <b><i>namespace</i></b> of the WSDL file</li>
   
   <li>
  --p indicates a mapping from the <b><i>package to a namespace</i></b>.&nbsp;
  +-p indicates a mapping from the <b><i>package to a namespace</i></b>. 
   There may be multiple mappings.</li>
   
   <li>
  @@ -1307,9 +1307,9 @@
   </ul>
   The output WSDL document will contain the appropriate WSDL types, messages,
   portType, bindings and service descriptions to support a SOAP rpc, encoding
  -web service.&nbsp; If your specified interface methods reference other
  +web service.  If your specified interface methods reference other
   classes, the Java2WSDL tool will generate the appropriate xml types to
  -represent the classes and any nested/inherited types.&nbsp; The tool supports
  +represent the classes and any nested/inherited types.  The tool supports
   JAX-RPC complex types (bean classes), extension classes, enumeration classes,
   arrays and Holder classes.
   <p>The Java2WSDL tool has many additional options which are detailed in the <a href="reference.html#Java2WSDL">reference 
  @@ -1320,18 +1320,19 @@
     
   <h4>
   Step 3: Create Bindings using WSDL2Java</h4>
  +
   Use the generated WSDL file to build the appropriate client/server bindings
   for the web service (see <a href="#WSDL2Java: Building stubs, skeletons, and data">WSDL2Java</a>):
  -<pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java -o . -d Session -s -S true&nbsp; -Nurn:Example6 samples.userguide.example6 wp.wsdl</pre>
  +<pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.wsdl.WSDL2Java -o . -d Session -s -S true  -Nurn:Example6 samples.userguide.example6 wp.wsdl</pre>
   <p>This will generate the following files:
   <ul>
     <li> <b><tt>WidgetPriceSoapBindingImpl.java</tt></b> : Java file containing 
       the default server implementation of the WidgetPrice web service.</li>
     <br>
     You will need to modify the *SoapBindingImpl file to add your implementation 
  -  (see&nbsp; <a href="../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPriceSoapBindingImpl.java">../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPriceSoapBindingImpl.java</a> 
  +  (see  <a href="../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPriceSoapBindingImpl.java">../samples/userguide/example6/WidgetPriceSoapBindingImpl.java</a> 
     ). 
  -  <li> <b><tt>WidgetPrice.java</tt></b>:&nbsp; New interface file that contains 
  +  <li> <b><tt>WidgetPrice.java</tt></b>:  New interface file that contains 
       the appropriate <b><tt>java.rmi.Remote</tt></b> usages.</li>
     <li> <b><tt>WidgetPriceService.java</tt></b>: Java file containing the client 
       side service interface.</li>
  @@ -1341,14 +1342,15 @@
     <li> <b><tt>WidgetPriceSoapBindingStub.java</tt></b>: Client side stub.</li>
     <li> <b><tt>deploy.wsdd</tt></b>: Deployment descriptor</li>
     <li> <b><tt>undeploy.wsdd</tt></b>: Undeployment descriptor</li>
  -  <li> (data types):&nbsp; Java files will be produced for all of the other types 
  -    and holders necessary for the web service.&nbsp; There are no additional files 
  +  <li> (data types):  Java files will be produced for all of the other types 
  +    and holders necessary for the web service.  There are no additional files 
       for the WidgetPrice web service.</li>
   </ul>
   <p>Now you have all of the necessary files to build your client/server side code 
     and deploy the web service!</p>
   <h2>
   <a NAME="published interfaces"></a>Published Axis Interfaces</h2>
  +
   Although you may use any of the interfaces and classes present in Axis, you need to
   be aware that some are more stable than others since there is a continuing
   need to refactor Axis to maintain and improve its modularity.
  
  
  

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