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From as...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms README.html
Date Fri, 24 Jan 2003 14:20:43 GMT
aslom       2003/01/24 06:20:43

  Modified:    java/samples/ejb README.html
               java/samples/ejb/service/deploy/jboss README.html
               java/samples/jms README.html
  Log:
  updated samples documentation
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.4       +4 -3      xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/README.html
  
  Index: README.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/README.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- README.html	16 Jan 2003 18:05:06 -0000	1.3
  +++ README.html	24 Jan 2003 14:20:43 -0000	1.4
  @@ -11,12 +11,13 @@
   Web Services Invocation Framework:<br>
   EJB Sample</h1>
   <p>This sample aims to demonstrate the invocation of an EJB through WSIF's API. This
means that an EJB is exposed as a first class WSDL-described service using the <a href="../../doc/wsdl_extensions/ejb_extension.html">EJB
binding extensions</a> defined in WSIF.</p>
  -<p>In this particular sample, we describe an AddressBook service, a common example
in various Web services toolkits. For those unfamilar with it, this service offers a port
type with three operations. Two of the operations add an entry to the address book, using
slightly different styles for providing input information. The third operation queries the
address book with a name. The service uses complex schema types for representing an address
and a phone number.</p>
  +<p>In this particular sample, we describe an AddressBook service, a common example
in various Web services toolkits. For those 
  +unfamiliar with it, this service offers a port type with three operations. Two of the operations
add an entry to the address book, using slightly different styles for providing input information.
The third operation queries the address book with a name. The service uses complex schema
types for representing an address and a phone number.</p>
   <p>The abstract functionality is tied to an EJB binding that describes how a stateful
session bean supports the abstract port type defined. It is worth emphasizing that this isn't
a standard WSDL binding, instead it exploits WSDL's extensibility to describe how to access
the abstract functionality when it is deployed and available on an EJB. You will notice that
the <tt>&lt;ejb:address&gt;</tt> element in the <a href="AddressBook.wsdl">AddressBook
WSDL</a> refers to an initial context factory that gets used by WSIF's EJB provider.
The classpath specified here is vendor specific and will need to be changed depending on your
particular deployment, we have provided instructions in the service deployment documentation
we link to below.</p>
   <p>The <a href="AddressBook.wsdl">WSDL file</a> is in this sample directory;
this has the EJB binding.</p>
   <p><a href="service/README.html">Here's</a> how this service is implemented.
We also describe how to deploy the EJB on a J2EE platform of your choice.</p>
   <p><a href="client/dynamic/README.html">Here's</a> how to invoke this
service dynamically using WSIF's dynamic invocation interface (DII).</p>
   <p><a href="client/stub/README.html">Here's</a> how to invoke this service
by first generating the stub interface and using this directly through WSIF's dynamic proxy,
thus hiding all WSIF specifics from the client code. Note that the stub interface used is
the the service interface as defined by the JAX-RPC specification.</p>
  -<p>Deployment of an EJB as well as acessing and using it is vendor-specific. We have
included instructions for deploying and using this sample in particular app server environments;
even if your favorite app server isn't part of our list, we have provided enough documentation
so that it should not be hard to run this sample in a different environment.
  +<p>Deployment of an EJB as well as accessing and using it is vendor-specific. We
have included instructions for deploying and using this sample in particular app server environments;
even if your favorite app server isn't part of our list, we have provided enough documentation
so that it should not be hard to run this sample in a different environment.
   <hr width="100%">
  -</body></html>
  +</body></html>
  \ No newline at end of file
  
  
  
  1.2       +3 -3      xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/service/deploy/jboss/README.html
  
  Index: README.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/service/deploy/jboss/README.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.1
  retrieving revision 1.2
  diff -u -r1.1 -r1.2
  --- README.html	16 Jan 2003 18:06:17 -0000	1.1
  +++ README.html	24 Jan 2003 14:20:43 -0000	1.2
  @@ -13,9 +13,9 @@
   <ul>
   <li>Deploying the sample: 
   We have included in this directory a pre-packaged jar that contains the compiled beans
and the configuration files required by JBoss. All you need to deploy to JBoss is to drop
this <a href="addressbook.jar">addressbook JAR file for JBoss</a> (assuming you
use the default server configuration) into <tt>server/default/deploy</tt> under
your JBoss server installation, and start your server. This has been tested with JBoss version
3.0.4 running on Windows 2000, with the sample client running on Windows 2000 and using WSIF
in a Java 1.4.1 environment.</li>
  -<li>Configuring the WSDL: Under the <tt>&lt;port&gt;</tt> section
of the <a href="../../AddressBook.wsdl">Addressbook WSDL</a> file, stick in the
following deployment information, which is specific to deployment in a JBoss environment:
  -<p><tt><pre>
  -        &lt;!-- JBoss specific EJB endpoint --&gt;
  +<li>Configuring the WSDL: Under the <tt>&lt;port&gt;</tt> section
of the
  +<a href="../../../AddressBook.wsdl">Addressbook WSDL</a> file, stick in the
following deployment information, which is specific to deployment in a JBoss environment:
  +<p><tt><pre>        &lt;!-- JBoss specific EJB endpoint --&gt;
   	&lt;ejb:address className="ejb.service.AddressBookSessionHome"
   		     jndiName="ejb/service/AddressBook"
                        initialContextFactory="org.jnp.interfaces.NamingContextFactory"
  
  
  
  1.5       +5 -4      xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms/README.html
  
  Index: README.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms/README.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- README.html	16 Jan 2003 18:07:27 -0000	1.4
  +++ README.html	24 Jan 2003 14:20:43 -0000	1.5
  @@ -10,12 +10,13 @@
   <h1>
   Web Services Invocation Framework:<br>
   JMS Sample</h1>
  -<p>In this sample shows how we can invoke systems implemented using message-oriented
middleware (MoM) using JMS through the WSIF API. As always, the WSIF API hides all the protocol-specific
(in this case, JMS) details; we use the same, WSDL-driven consistent view of the software.
The key here is the WSIF defines a <a href="../../doc/wsdl_extensions/jms_bindings.htm">JMS
binding</a> that lets us maps abstract messages to JMS messages, use JMS headers, properties,
etc. The <tt>&lt;port&gt;</tt> section of the WSDL will then refer to
a message queue as the target of the request messages, along with the required JNDI information
to locate the queue dynamically.</p>
  +<p>In this sample shows how we can invoke systems implemented using message-oriented
middleware (MoM) using JMS through the WSIF API. As always, the WSIF API hides all the protocol-specific
(in this case, JMS) details; we use the same, WSDL-driven consistent view of the software.
The key here is the WSIF defines a
  +<a href="../../doc/wsdl_extensions/jms_bindings.html">JMS binding</a> that
lets us maps abstract messages to JMS messages, use JMS headers, properties, etc. The <tt>&lt;port&gt;</tt>
section of the WSDL will then refer to a message queue as the target of the request messages,
along with the required JNDI information to locate the queue dynamically.</p>
   <p>Our particular example is a very simple service. The purpose of the service is
to inform users whether DSL service is available at a particular zip code or not. It exposes
a single port type which offers one operation called <tt>checkAvailability</tt>.
This operation takes as input a message with a single part (a string), representing the zip
code, and returns as output a string whose value will be either true or false, depending on
whether DSL service is available or not.</p>
   <p>The JMS binding for the service uses JMS text messages for communication. The
WSIF JMS provider handles conversion of the abstract invocation to the sending of a JMS message
to the desired destination queue, as specified in the WSDL. The return message is received
over a temporary queue and returned to the application that made the invocation. From the
application's viewpoint, it looks like a synchronous invocation; at the lower (JMS) level,
it is really asynchronous.</p>
  -<p><a href="ServiceAvailability.wsdl">Here</a> is the service WSDL. Note
the JMS binding and the endpoint details for the service. The endpoint information specifies
that the service will listen for messages sent to a queue; the queue can be looked up using
the JNDI name <tt>queue/A</tt>. The initial context factory specified is vendor-specific,
see intructions in the service README below that tell you how to fill in these fields for
particular app server environments.</p>
  +<p><a href="ServiceAvailability.wsdl">Here</a> is the service WSDL. Note
the JMS binding and the endpoint details for the service. The endpoint information specifies
that the service will listen for messages sent to a queue; the queue can be looked up using
the JNDI name <tt>queue/A</tt>. The initial context factory specified is vendor-specific,
see instructions in the service README below that tell you how to fill in these fields for
particular app server environments.</p>
   <p><a href="service/README.html">Here</a> are details on how the service
is implemented and deployed so that it is accessible using JMS. These details include instructions
on how to deploy the service in your favorite J2EE server.</p>
   <p>Once your service is deployed and available using JMS, you can use WSIF's dynamic
invocation API to use it, as described <a href="client/dynamic/README.html">here</a>.</p>
  -<p><a href="client/stub/README.html">Here</a> is how you can pregenerate
stubs to access the same service using a stub API, resulting in a client application that
deals with a simple service interface instead of WSIF-specific code.</p>
  +<p><a href="client/stub/README.html">Here</a> is how you can pre-generate
stubs to access the same service using a stub API, resulting in a client application that
deals with a simple service interface instead of WSIF-specific code.</p>
   <hr width="100%">
  -</body></html>
  +</body></html>
  \ No newline at end of file
  
  
  

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