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From nmu...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms/service README.html
Date Thu, 23 Jan 2003 12:40:19 GMT
nmukhi      2003/01/23 04:40:17

  Modified:    java/doc samples.html
               java/samples/ejb/service README.html
               java/samples/jms/service README.html
  Log:
  Minor changes to docs:
  Changed sample main doc so that it instructs users to download
  JAR files and put them into new lib structure.
  Changed EJB and JMS sample READMEs to have a direct link to
  JBoss-specific instructions for deployment (rather than have
  the reader walk down the deploy/ directory).
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.7       +5 -5      xml-axis-wsif/java/doc/samples.html
  
  Index: samples.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/doc/samples.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.6
  retrieving revision 1.7
  diff -u -r1.6 -r1.7
  --- samples.html	27 Dec 2002 22:12:09 -0000	1.6
  +++ samples.html	23 Jan 2003 12:40:17 -0000	1.7
  @@ -16,12 +16,12 @@
   required JAR files. If you use binary distribution of WSIF most of JAR
   files is already provided and classpath script can be used to set
   CLASSPATH.&nbsp; You will only need to download <b>activation.jar</b>
  -and put it into <b>lib/activation</b> (<a
  -href="../lib/activation/README.txt">see README</a>), <b>mail.jar</b>
  -and put it into <b>lib/javamail</b>&nbsp; (<a
  -href="../lib/javamail/README.txt">see README</a>) and
  +and put it into <b>lib/</b> (<a
  +href="../lib/README.html">see README</a>), <b>mail.jar</b>
  +and put it into <b>lib/</b>&nbsp; (<a
  +href="../lib/README.html">see README</a>) and
   <b>optionally</b> j2ee.jar or other jar file with J2EE APIs and put it
  -into lib/j2ee (<a href="../lib/j2ee/README.txt">see README</a>). All
  +into lib/ (<a href="../lib/README.html">see README</a>). All
   of those files must be downloaded separately as they can not be
   distributed. j2ee.jar is required if you would like to compile EJB,
   JCA or JMS providers or run samples that use those providers.</p>
  
  
  
  1.4       +1 -1      xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/service/README.html
  
  Index: README.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/ejb/service/README.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- README.html	16 Jan 2003 18:05:07 -0000	1.3
  +++ README.html	23 Jan 2003 12:40:17 -0000	1.4
  @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@
         <li><tt><a href="AddressBookSession.java">AddressBookSessionHome.java</a></tt>,
the home interface for our session bean.</li>
         <li><tt><a href="AddressBookSessionBean.java">AddressBookSessionBean.java</a></tt>,
the EJBimplementation. This is as vanilla as can be, using a hash table to store a map of
names to addresses.</li>
         <li><tt><a href="addressbook">addressbook</a></tt>
is a subdirectory containing the complex Java types used - these can be generated from the
WSDL</li>
  -      <li><tt><a href="deploy">deploy</a></tt> is a subdirectory
containing the things necessary to deploy this EJB to your favorite application server. Generally
to deploy your EJB you will need to compile the code for this sample, then package it into
a JAR along with an <tt><a href="deploy/jboss/ejb-jar.xml">ejb-jar.xml</a></tt>
file. Your application server may need other files, take a look at app server specific instructions
under the deploy directory.</li>
  +      <li><tt>deploy</tt> is a subdirectory containing the things necessary
to deploy this EJB to your favorite application server. Generally to deploy your EJB you will
need to compile the code for this sample, then package it into a JAR along with an <tt><a
href="deploy/jboss/ejb-jar.xml">ejb-jar.xml</a></tt> file. Your application
server may need other files, take a look at app server specific instructions under the deploy
directory. <a href="deploy/jboss/README.html">Here</a> is the README in case you
use JBoss.</li>
   </ul>
   <hr width="100%">
   </body></html>
  
  
  
  1.4       +1 -1      xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms/service/README.html
  
  Index: README.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis-wsif/java/samples/jms/service/README.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- README.html	22 Jan 2003 21:00:53 -0000	1.3
  +++ README.html	23 Jan 2003 12:40:17 -0000	1.4
  @@ -12,6 +12,6 @@
   Implementing the JMS service</h1>
   <p>The JMS service is implemented as a message driven bean (MDB). In case you need
to learn more about MDBs, you can refer to various guides and tutorials available for free
online; I found <a href="http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/excerpt/ejb3_ch13/index.html">this
excerpt from Richard Monson-Haefel's EJB book</a> useful.</p>
   <p>The bean implementation is very simple. It acts as a message listener (the queue
is determined by the deployment files). When a message is delivered, it extracts the body
(recall that we are using JMSTextMessages to communicate back and forth since we are just
exchanging strings). This is presumably a valid zip code, so the bean makes it an integer
in an unsafe and intrepid manner. Here is applies some logic to determine whether DSL service
is available at this zip code or not. A real-world implementation would invariably refer to
some backend database using JDBC or do something similarly smart. Our implementation, being
just a sample, returns true for all zip codes &lt; 50000, and false otherwise. The return
message is sent to the queue specified in the <tt>replyTo</tt> field of the request
message. Note that the bean must encode the correct <tt>JMSCorrelationID</tt>
in the return message in order for it to be picked up by WSIF. <a href="ServiceAvailabilityBean.java">Here</a>
is the code for our MDB.</p>
  -<p>The <tt><a href="deploy">deploy</a></tt> subdirectory
contains the things necessary to deploy this MDB to your favorite application server. Generally
to deploy your MDB you will need to compile the code for this sample, then package it into
a JAR along with the <tt><a href="deploy/jboss/ejb-jar.xml">ejb-jar.xml</a></tt>
file. Your application server may need other files, take a look at app server specific instructions
under the deploy directory. You will also need to fill in the vendor specific deployment information
in the sevice WSDL, instructions for which you will also find under the deploy directory.
  +<p>The <tt>deploy</tt> subdirectory contains the things necessary to
deploy this MDB to your favorite application server. Generally to deploy your MDB you will
need to compile the code for this sample, then package it into a JAR along with the <tt><a
href="deploy/jboss/ejb-jar.xml">ejb-jar.xml</a></tt> file. Your application
server may need other files, take a look at app server specific instructions under the deploy
directory. You will also need to fill in the vendor specific deployment information in the
sevice WSDL, instructions for which you will also find under the deploy directory. <a href="deploy/jboss/README.html">Here</a>
are instructions for setting up in case you use JBoss.
   <hr width="100%">
   </body></html>
  
  
  

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