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From gdani...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: xml-axis/java/docs user-guide.html
Date Wed, 01 Aug 2001 21:29:59 GMT
gdaniels    01/08/01 14:29:59

  Modified:    java/docs user-guide.html
  Log:
  More work...
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.3       +71 -15    xml-axis/java/docs/user-guide.html
  
  Index: user-guide.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/xml-axis/java/docs/user-guide.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- user-guide.html	2001/07/30 22:03:59	1.2
  +++ user-guide.html	2001/08/01 21:29:59	1.3
  @@ -85,8 +85,13 @@
     <li>An HTTP servlet-based transport</li>
     <li>A standalone version of the server (HTTP)</li>
     <li>Examples, including a client and server for the soapbuilders community interoperability

  -    tests </li>
  +    tests</li>
   </ul>
  +<h3>What's missing?</h3>
  +<ul>
  +  <li>Nuttin.</li>
  +  <li>Well, OK, sumpin.</li>
  +</ul>
   <h2><a name="Installation"></a>Installing Axis</h2>
   See the <a href="file:///E|/Documents/Axis/install.html">Axis Installation Guide</a>
for instructions on 
   installing Axis. 
  @@ -220,6 +225,8 @@
     system without source. Also, the amount of configuration you can do as to how 
     the service gets accessed is pretty limited - you can't specify custom type 
     mappings, or control which Handlers get invoked when people are using your service.</p>
  +<h4>Deploying via descriptors</h4>
  +One way blah blah blah. 
   <pre>&lt;admin:deploy xmlns:admin=&quot;AdminService&quot;&gt;
    &lt;service name=&quot;MyService&quot; pivot=&quot;RPCDispatcher&quot;&gt;
     &lt;option name=&quot;classname&quot; value=&quot;MyService&quot;/&gt;
  @@ -228,20 +235,43 @@
   &lt;/admin:deploy&gt;</pre>
   <p>Pretty simple, really - the outermost element tells the engine that this is 
     a deployment (other options are &quot;undeploy&quot; and &quot;list&quot;
- 
  -  see the deployment reference). Then we deploy a service</p>
  +  see the deployment reference). Then we deploy a service.</p>
  +<h4>Using the AdminClient</h4>
  +<p>Once we've got this file, we need to send it to an Axis server in order to 
  +  actually deploy the described service. We do this with the AdminClient, or the 
  +  &quot;org.apache.axis.client.AdminClient&quot; class. An invocation of the AdminClient

  +  looks like this:</p>
  +<pre>% java org.apache.axis.client.AdminClient deploy.xml
  +&lt;??&gt;&lt;admin&gt;done processing&lt;/admin&gt;</pre>
  +<p>This </p>
  +<h4>More deployment - Handlers and Chains</h4>
   <p>Now let's start to explore some of the more powerful features of the Axis engine.

  -  Let's say you want to track how many times your service has been called, and 
  -  by whom.</p>
  +  Let's say you want to track how many times your service has been called. We've 
  +  included a sample handler in the samples/log directory to do just this. To use 
  +  a handler class like this, you first need to deploy the Handler itself, and 
  +  then use the name that you give it in deploying a service. Here's a sample deploy.xml

  +  file: </p>
   <pre>&lt;admin:deploy xmlns:admin=&quot;AdminService&quot;&gt;
    &lt;!-- define the logging handler configuration --&gt;
  - &lt;handler name=&quot;track&quot; class=&quot;org.apache.axis.handlers.LogHandler&quot;&gt;
  + &lt;handler name=&quot;track&quot; class=&quot;samples.log.LogHandler&quot;&gt;
     &lt;option name=&quot;filename&quot; value=&quot;MyService.log&quot;/&gt;
    &lt;/handler&gt;
   
    &lt;!-- define the service, using the log handler we just defined --&gt;
  - &lt;service name=&quot;MyService&quot; request=&quot;track&quot; pivot=&quot;RPCDispatcher&quot;&gt;
  - &lt;/service&gt;
  + &lt;service name=&quot;MyService&quot; <b>request=&quot;track&quot;</b>
pivot=&quot;RPCDispatcher&quot;&gt;
  +  &lt;option name=&quot;className&quot; value=&quot;samples.log.Service&quot;/&gt;
  +  &lt;option name=&quot;methodName&quot; value=&quot;*&quot;/&gt;
  +&lt;/service&gt;
   &lt;/admin:deploy&gt;</pre>
  +<p>The first section defines a Handler called &quot;track&quot; which is
implemented 
  +  by the class &quot;samples.log.LogHandler&quot;. We give this Handler an option

  +  to let it know which file to write its messages into.</p>
  +<p>Then we define a service, &quot;MyService&quot;, which is an RPC server
just 
  +  like we saw above in our first example. The difference is the &quot;request&quot;

  +  attribute - this indicates a Handler (or set of Handlers) which should be invoked 
  +  when the service is invoked, before the pivot handler. By setting this to &quot;track&quot;,

  +  we ensure that the message will be logged each time this service is invoked.<br>
  +</p>
   <h4>Remote Administration</h4>
   <p>Note that by default, the Axis server is configured to only accept administration

     requests from the machine on which it resides - if you wish to enable remote 
  @@ -263,14 +293,40 @@
     the standard JavaBean pattern of get/set accessors. All you need to do is tell 
     Axis which Java classes map to which XML Schema types. Configuring a bean mapping 
     looks like this:</p>
  -<p>&lt;beanMapping&gt;</p>
  -<p>Let's take a look at how this works. Go look at the docs/examples/example4/BeanService.java

  -  file. (we won't reproduce it here, it's pretty basic) The key thing to notice 
  -  is that the argument to the service method is an Order object. Since Order is 
  -  not a basic type which Axis understands by default, trying to run the service 
  -  without a type mapping will result in a fault (if you want to try this for yourself,

  -  you can use the simple-deploy.xml file in the example4 directory). But if we 
  -  put a beanMapping into our deployment, all will be well.</p>
  +<pre class="xml">&lt;beanMappings&gt;
  + &lt;ns:local xmlns:ns=&quot;someNamespace&quot; classname=&quot;my.java.thingy&quot;/&gt;
  +&lt;/beanMappings&gt;</pre>
  +<p>Inside the &lt;beanMappings&gt; element is an arbitrary number of other
elements, 
  +  each of which maps a Java class (presumably a bean) to an XML QName. The QName 
  +  of the element itself is the XML QName, and the value of the classname attribute 
  +  is the Java class name. So in this case, we'd be mapping the &quot;my.java.thingy&quot;

  +  class to the XML QName [someNamespace]:[local].</p>
  +<p>Let's take a look at how this works in practice. Go look at the docs/examples/example4/BeanService.java

  +  file. (we won't reproduce it here, it's pretty straightforward) The key thing 
  +  to notice is that the argument to the service method is an Order object. Since 
  +  Order is not a basic type which Axis understands by default, trying to run this 
  +  service without a type mapping will result in a fault (if you want to try this 
  +  for yourself, you can use the bad-deploy.xml file in the example4 directory). 
  +  But if we put a beanMapping into our deployment, all will be well. Here's how 
  +  to run this example (from the example4 directory):</p>
  +<pre class="example">% java org.apache.axis.client.AdminClient -llocal:// deploy.xml
  +&lt;?xml version=&quot;1.0&quot; encoding=&quot;UTF-8&quot;?&gt;&lt;Admin&gt;Done
processing&lt;/Admin&gt;
  +
  +
  +% java Client -llocal:// -n &quot;Glen&quot;
  +Hi, Glen!
  +
  +
  +You seem to have ordered the following:
  +
  +
  +1 of item : mp3jukebox
  +4 of item : 1600mahBattery
  +
  +
  +If this had been a real order processing system, we'd probably have charged you about now.
  +%<br>
  +</pre>
   <h3>When Beans Are Not Enough - Custom Serialization</h3>
   <p>Just as JWS deployment is sometimes not flexible enough to meet all needs, 
     the default bean serialization model isn't robust enough to handle every case 
  
  
  

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