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From ima...@apache.org
Subject [08/51] [partial] asterixdb git commit: Update adm.grammar and printers for double/float
Date Wed, 29 Jun 2016 23:35:31 GMT
http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/asterixdb/blob/d76a0c0f/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/ngram-jaccard-inline/ngram-jaccard-inline.1.adm
----------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/ngram-jaccard-inline/ngram-jaccard-inline.1.adm
b/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/ngram-jaccard-inline/ngram-jaccard-inline.1.adm
index c1d8b92..401e9a2 100644
--- a/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/ngram-jaccard-inline/ngram-jaccard-inline.1.adm
+++ b/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/ngram-jaccard-inline/ngram-jaccard-inline.1.adm
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-{ "arec": { "id": 21, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/MengY95", "authors": "Weiyi Meng Clement
T. Yu", "misc": "2002-01-03 551-572 1995 Modern Database Systems db/books/collections/kim95.html#MengY95",
"title": "Query Processing in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 89, "csxid": "oai
CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.33.8596", "title": "Dynamic Query Optimization and Query Processing in
Multidatabase Systems 1.", "authors": "Henryk Josinski", "misc": "2009-04-15 Introduction
 The multidatabase system (MDBS) approach, as a solution for integrated access to information
distributed among diverse data sources, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. The
multidatabase system is a database system which integrates pre--existing databases allowing
the users to access simultaneously database systems (DBMSs) formulating a global query based
on a global schema.  The component DBMSs are assumed to be heterogeneous and autonomous. Heterogeneity
refers to different user interfaces, data models, query
  languages, and query optimization strategies [5]. Local autonomy means that each DBMS retains
complete control over local data and processing. As result of this, its cost model may not
be available to the global query optimizer.  When a global query is submitted, it is decomposed
into two types of queries [1]   -- subqueries, operating on sharable data items from local
databases,  -- assembling queries, consisting of, CiteSeerX  2009-04-15 2007-11-22 2000 application/pdf
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.33.8596 http //www.edbt2000.uni-konstanz.de/phd-workshop/papers/Josinski.pdf
en 10.1.1.27.4704 10.1.1.51.8352 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the
oai identifier remains attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.527027f }
-{ "arec": { "id": 3, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/BreitbartGS95", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart
Hector Garcia-Molina Abraham Silberschatz", "misc": "2004-03-08 573-591 Modern Database Systems
books/acm/Kim95 db/books/collections/kim95.html#BreitbartGS95 1995", "title": "Transaction
Management in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 85, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.37.8818",
"title": "Overview of Multidatabase Transaction Management", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart Hector
Garcia-Molina Avi Silberschatz", "misc": "2009-06-22 A multidatabase system (MDBS) is a facility
that allows users access to data located in multiple autonomous database management systems
(DBMSs). In such a system, global transactions are executed under the control of the MDBS.
Independently, local transactions are executed under the control of the local DBMSs. Each
local DBMS integrated by the MDBS may employ a different transaction management scheme. In
addition, each local DBMS has complete control over all tr
 ansactions (global and local) executing at its site, including the ability to abort at any
point any of the transactions executing at its site. Typically, no design or internal DBMS
structure changes are allowed in order to accommodate the MDBS. Furthermore, the local DBMSs
may not be aware of each other, and, as a consequence, cannot coordinate their actions. Thus,
traditional techniques for ensuring transaction atomicity and consistency in homogeneous distributed
database systems may not be appropriate for an MDBS environment.... CiteSeerX  2009-06-22
2007-11-22 1992 text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.37.8818 ftp //ftp.cs.utexas.edu/pub/avi/UT-CS-TR-92-21.PS.Z
en 10.1.1.101.8988 10.1.1.130.1772 10.1.1.38.6210 10.1.1.34.3768 10.1.1.36.1275 10.1.1.104.3430
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10.1.1.14
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10.1.1.143.3448 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier remains
attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.55932206f }
-{ "arec": { "id": 3, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/BreitbartGS95", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart
Hector Garcia-Molina Abraham Silberschatz", "misc": "2004-03-08 573-591 Modern Database Systems
books/acm/Kim95 db/books/collections/kim95.html#BreitbartGS95 1995", "title": "Transaction
Management in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 86, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.54.6302",
"title": "Overview of Multidatabase Transaction Management", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart Hector
Garcia-molina Avi Silberschatz", "misc": "2009-04-12 A multidatabase system (MDBS) is a facility
that allows users access to data located in multiple autonomous database management systems
(DBMSs). In such a system, global transactions are executed under the control of the MDBS.
Independently, local transactions are executed under the control of the local DBMSs. Each
local DBMS integrated by the MDBS may employ a different transaction management scheme. In
addition, each local DBMS has complete control over all tr
 ansactions (global and local) executing at its site, including the ability to abort at any
point any of the transactions executing at its site. Typically, no design or internal DBMS
structure changes are allowed in order to accommodate the MDBS. Furthermore, the local DBMSs
may not be aware of each other, and, as a consequence, cannot coordinate their actions. Thus,
traditional techniques for ensuring transaction atomicity and consistency in homogeneous distributed
database systems may not be appropriate for an MDBS environment.... CiteSeerX  2009-04-12
2007-11-22 1992 application/postscript text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.54.6302
http //www-db.stanford.edu/pub/papers/multidatabase.ps en 10.1.1.101.8988 10.1.1.130.1772
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10.1.1.21.7181 10.1.1.33.2343 10.1.1.23.3117 10.1
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10.1.1.140.5244 10.1.1.143.3448 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the oai
identifier remains attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.55932206f }
-{ "arec": { "id": 5, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/DayalHW95", "authors": "Umeshwar Dayal Eric
N. Hanson Jennifer Widom", "misc": "2002-01-03 434-456 1995 Modern Database Systems db/books/collections/kim95.html#DayalHW95",
"title": "Active Database Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 98, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.49.2910",
"title": "Active Database Systems", "authors": "Umeshwar Dayal Eric N. Hanson Jennifer Widom",
"misc": "2009-04-12 In Won Kim editor Modern Database Systems The Object Model Integrating
a production rules facility into a database system provides a uniform mechanism for a number
of advanced database features including integrity constraint enforcement, derived data maintenance,
triggers, alerters, protection, version control, and others. In addition, a database system
with rule processing capabilities provides a useful platform for large and efficient knowledge-base
and expert systems. Database systems with production rules are referred to as active database
systems, 
 and the field of active database systems has indeed been active. This chapter summarizes
current work in active database systems  topics covered include active database rule models
and languages, rule execution semantics, and implementation issues.  1 Introduction  Conventional
database systems are passive  they only execute queries or transactions explicitly submitted
by a user or an application program. For many applications, however, it is important to monitor
situations of interest, and to ... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-12 2007-11-22 1994 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.49.2910 http //www-db.stanford.edu/pub/papers/book-chapter.ps
en 10.1.1.17.1323 10.1.1.143.7196 10.1.1.50.3821 10.1.1.51.9946 10.1.1.41.2030 10.1.1.46.2504
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10.1.1.50.8529 10.1.1.1
 33.4287 10.1.1.50.7278 10.1.1.10.1688 10.1.1.19.8669 10.1.1.44.7600 10.1.1.144.376 10.1.1.44.1348
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10.1.1.53.6783 10.1.1.52.6151 10.1.1.104.6911 10.1.1.105.1691 10.1.1.21.1984 10.1.1.23.2775
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10.1.1.35.3458 10.1.1.26.4620 10.1.1.18.8936 10.1.1.19.3694 10.1.1.12.631 10.1.1.48.6394 Metadata
may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier r
 emains attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.95454544f }
-{ "arec": { "id": 25, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/RusinkiewiczS95", "authors": "Marek Rusinkiewicz
Amit P. Sheth", "misc": "2004-03-08 592-620 Modern Database Systems books/acm/Kim95 db/books/collections/kim95.html#RusinkiewiczS95
1995", "title": "Specification and Execution of Transactional Workflows." }, "brec": { "id":
88, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.43.3839", "title": "Specification and Execution of Transactional
Workflows", "authors": "Marek Rusinkiewicz Amit Sheth", "misc": "2009-04-13 The basic transaction
model has evolved over time to incorporate more complex transaction structures  and to selectively
modify the atomicity and isolation properties. In this chapter we discuss the application
 of transaction concepts to activities that involve coordinated execution of multiple tasks
(possibly of  different types) over different processing entities. Such applications are referred
to as transactional  workflows. In this chapter we discuss the specification of such workflows
  and the issues involved in their  execution.  1 What is a Workflow?  Workflows are activities
involving the coordinated execution of multiple tasks performed by different processing entities.
A task defines some work to be done and can be specified in a number of ways, including a
textual description in a file or an email, a form, a message, or a computer program. A processing
entity that performs the tasks may be a person or a software system (e.g., a mailer, an application
program, a database mana... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-13 2007-11-22 1995 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.43.3839 http //lsdis.cs.uga.edu/lib/././download/RS93.ps
en 10.1.1.17.1323 10.1.1.59.5051 10.1.1.38.6210 10.1.1.68.7445 10.1.1.109.5175 10.1.1.17.7962
10.1.1.44.7778 10.1.1.112.244 10.1.1.13.7602 10.1.1.102.7874 10.1.1.41.4043 10.1.1.49.5143
10.1.1.41.7252 10.1.1.17.3225 10.1.1.54.7761 10.1.1.55.5255 10.1.1.108.958 10.1.1.35.7733
10.1.1.52.3682 10.1.1.36.
 1618 10.1.1.45.6317 10.1.1.43.3180 10.1.1.35.8718 10.1.1.44.6365 10.1.1.51.2883 10.1.1.50.9206
10.1.1.6.9085 10.1.1.30.1707 10.1.1.80.6634 10.1.1.49.355 10.1.1.127.3550 10.1.1.35.3562 10.1.1.137.8832
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10.1.1.4.1055 10.1.1.48.9175 10.1
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10.1.1.43.4845 10.1.1.34.8273 10.1.1.35.4783 10.1.1.28.3176 10.1.1.16.8151 10.1.1.8.9117 10.1.1.58.3449
10.1.1.142.7041 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier remains
attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.9811321f }
+{ "arec": { "id": 21, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/MengY95", "authors": "Weiyi Meng Clement
T. Yu", "misc": "2002-01-03 551-572 1995 Modern Database Systems db/books/collections/kim95.html#MengY95",
"title": "Query Processing in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 89, "csxid": "oai
CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.33.8596", "title": "Dynamic Query Optimization and Query Processing in
Multidatabase Systems 1.", "authors": "Henryk Josinski", "misc": "2009-04-15 Introduction
 The multidatabase system (MDBS) approach, as a solution for integrated access to information
distributed among diverse data sources, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. The
multidatabase system is a database system which integrates pre--existing databases allowing
the users to access simultaneously database systems (DBMSs) formulating a global query based
on a global schema.  The component DBMSs are assumed to be heterogeneous and autonomous. Heterogeneity
refers to different user interfaces, data models, query
  languages, and query optimization strategies [5]. Local autonomy means that each DBMS retains
complete control over local data and processing. As result of this, its cost model may not
be available to the global query optimizer.  When a global query is submitted, it is decomposed
into two types of queries [1]   -- subqueries, operating on sharable data items from local
databases,  -- assembling queries, consisting of, CiteSeerX  2009-04-15 2007-11-22 2000 application/pdf
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.33.8596 http //www.edbt2000.uni-konstanz.de/phd-workshop/papers/Josinski.pdf
en 10.1.1.27.4704 10.1.1.51.8352 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the
oai identifier remains attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.527027 }
+{ "arec": { "id": 3, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/BreitbartGS95", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart
Hector Garcia-Molina Abraham Silberschatz", "misc": "2004-03-08 573-591 Modern Database Systems
books/acm/Kim95 db/books/collections/kim95.html#BreitbartGS95 1995", "title": "Transaction
Management in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 85, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.37.8818",
"title": "Overview of Multidatabase Transaction Management", "authors": "Yuri Breitbart Hector
Garcia-Molina Avi Silberschatz", "misc": "2009-06-22 A multidatabase system (MDBS) is a facility
that allows users access to data located in multiple autonomous database management systems
(DBMSs). In such a system, global transactions are executed under the control of the MDBS.
Independently, local transactions are executed under the control of the local DBMSs. Each
local DBMS integrated by the MDBS may employ a different transaction management scheme. In
addition, each local DBMS has complete control over all tr
 ansactions (global and local) executing at its site, including the ability to abort at any
point any of the transactions executing at its site. Typically, no design or internal DBMS
structure changes are allowed in order to accommodate the MDBS. Furthermore, the local DBMSs
may not be aware of each other, and, as a consequence, cannot coordinate their actions. Thus,
traditional techniques for ensuring transaction atomicity and consistency in homogeneous distributed
database systems may not be appropriate for an MDBS environment.... CiteSeerX  2009-06-22
2007-11-22 1992 text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.37.8818 ftp //ftp.cs.utexas.edu/pub/avi/UT-CS-TR-92-21.PS.Z
en 10.1.1.101.8988 10.1.1.130.1772 10.1.1.38.6210 10.1.1.34.3768 10.1.1.36.1275 10.1.1.104.3430
10.1.1.112.244 10.1.1.94.9106 10.1.1.41.4043 10.1.1.49.5143 10.1.1.59.2034 10.1.1.53.875 10.1.1.137.5642
10.1.1.41.8832 10.1.1.21.1100 10.1.1.105.3626 10.1.1.44.773 10.1.1.21.2576 10.1.1.40.6484
10.1.1.14
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database systems may not be appropriate for an MDBS environment.... CiteSeerX  2009-04-12
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a production rules facility into a database system provides a uniform mechanism for a number
of advanced database features including integrity constraint enforcement, derived data maintenance,
triggers, alerters, protection, version control, and others. In addition, a database system
with rule processing capabilities provides a useful platform for large and efficient knowledge-base
and expert systems. Database systems with production rules are referred to as active database
systems, 
 and the field of active database systems has indeed been active. This chapter summarizes
current work in active database systems  topics covered include active database rule models
and languages, rule execution semantics, and implementation issues.  1 Introduction  Conventional
database systems are passive  they only execute queries or transactions explicitly submitted
by a user or an application program. For many applications, however, it is important to monitor
situations of interest, and to ... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-12 2007-11-22 1994 application/postscript
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modify the atomicity and isolation properties. In this chapter we discuss the application
 of transaction concepts to activities that involve coordinated execution of multiple tasks
(possibly of  different types) over different processing entities. Such applications are referred
to as transactional  workflows. In this chapter we discuss the specification of such workflows
  and the issues involved in their  execution.  1 What is a Workflow?  Workflows are activities
involving the coordinated execution of multiple tasks performed by different processing entities.
A task defines some work to be done and can be specified in a number of ways, including a
textual description in a file or an email, a form, a message, or a computer program. A processing
entity that performs the tasks may be a person or a software system (e.g., a mailer, an application
program, a database mana... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-13 2007-11-22 1995 application/postscript
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http://git-wip-us.apache.org/repos/asf/asterixdb/blob/d76a0c0f/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/word-jaccard-inline/word-jaccard-inline.1.adm
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diff --git a/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/word-jaccard-inline/word-jaccard-inline.1.adm
b/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/word-jaccard-inline/word-jaccard-inline.1.adm
index 6ad61d5..1af9c38 100644
--- a/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/word-jaccard-inline/word-jaccard-inline.1.adm
+++ b/asterixdb/asterix-app/src/test/resources/runtimets/results/nested-open-index/index-join/word-jaccard-inline/word-jaccard-inline.1.adm
@@ -1,3 +1,3 @@
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 The multidatabase system (MDBS) approach, as a solution for integrated access to information
distributed among diverse data sources, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. The
multidatabase system is a database system which integrates pre--existing databases allowing
the users to access simultaneously database systems (DBMSs) formulating a global query based
on a global schema.  The component DBMSs are assumed to be heterogeneous and autonomous. Heterogeneity
refers to different user interfaces, data models, query
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complete control over local data and processing. As result of this, its cost model may not
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databases,  -- assembling queries, consisting of, CiteSeerX  2009-04-15 2007-11-22 2000 application/pdf
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"misc": "2009-04-12 In Won Kim editor Modern Database Systems The Object Model Integrating
a production rules facility into a database system provides a uniform mechanism for a number
of advanced database features including integrity constraint enforcement, derived data maintenance,
triggers, alerters, protection, version control, and others. In addition, a database system
with rule processing capabilities provides a useful platform for large and efficient knowledge-base
and expert systems. Database systems with production rules are referred to as active database
systems, 
 and the field of active database systems has indeed been active. This chapter summarizes
current work in active database systems  topics covered include active database rule models
and languages, rule execution semantics, and implementation issues.  1 Introduction  Conventional
database systems are passive  they only execute queries or transactions explicitly submitted
by a user or an application program. For many applications, however, it is important to monitor
situations of interest, and to ... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-12 2007-11-22 1994 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.49.2910 http //www-db.stanford.edu/pub/papers/book-chapter.ps
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modify the atomicity and isolation properties. In this chapter we discuss the application
 of transaction concepts to activities that involve coordinated execution of multiple tasks
(possibly of  different types) over different processing entities. Such applications are referred
to as transactional  workflows. In this chapter we discuss the specification of such workflows
  and the issues involved in their  execution.  1 What is a Workflow?  Workflows are activities
involving the coordinated execution of multiple tasks performed by different processing entities.
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textual description in a file or an email, a form, a message, or a computer program. A processing
entity that performs the tasks may be a person or a software system (e.g., a mailer, an application
program, a database mana... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-13 2007-11-22 1995 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.43.3839 http //lsdis.cs.uga.edu/lib/././download/RS93.ps
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10.1.1.55.8770 10.1.1.54.8188 10.1.1.101.7919 10.1.1.104.8176 10.1.1.24.5741 10.1.1.29.4667
10.1.1.4.1055 10.1.1.48.9175 10.1
 .1.56.792 10.1.1.65.3172 10.1.1.66.5947 10.1.1.73.8532 10.1.1.83.8299 10.1.1.86.8521 10.1.1.87.2402
10.1.1.87.4648 10.1.1.90.5638 10.1.1.91.1709 10.1.1.94.4248 10.1.1.114.511 10.1.1.119.5037
10.1.1.124.7957 10.1.1.49.215 10.1.1.53.7777 10.1.1.53.9711 10.1.1.45.9409 10.1.1.40.8789
10.1.1.43.4845 10.1.1.34.8273 10.1.1.35.4783 10.1.1.28.3176 10.1.1.16.8151 10.1.1.8.9117 10.1.1.58.3449
10.1.1.142.7041 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier remains
attached to it." }, "jacc": 1.0f }
+{ "arec": { "id": 21, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/MengY95", "authors": "Weiyi Meng Clement
T. Yu", "misc": "2002-01-03 551-572 1995 Modern Database Systems db/books/collections/kim95.html#MengY95",
"title": "Query Processing in Multidatabase Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 89, "csxid": "oai
CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.33.8596", "title": "Dynamic Query Optimization and Query Processing in
Multidatabase Systems 1.", "authors": "Henryk Josinski", "misc": "2009-04-15 Introduction
 The multidatabase system (MDBS) approach, as a solution for integrated access to information
distributed among diverse data sources, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. The
multidatabase system is a database system which integrates pre--existing databases allowing
the users to access simultaneously database systems (DBMSs) formulating a global query based
on a global schema.  The component DBMSs are assumed to be heterogeneous and autonomous. Heterogeneity
refers to different user interfaces, data models, query
  languages, and query optimization strategies [5]. Local autonomy means that each DBMS retains
complete control over local data and processing. As result of this, its cost model may not
be available to the global query optimizer.  When a global query is submitted, it is decomposed
into two types of queries [1]   -- subqueries, operating on sharable data items from local
databases,  -- assembling queries, consisting of, CiteSeerX  2009-04-15 2007-11-22 2000 application/pdf
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.33.8596 http //www.edbt2000.uni-konstanz.de/phd-workshop/papers/Josinski.pdf
en 10.1.1.27.4704 10.1.1.51.8352 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the
oai identifier remains attached to it." }, "jacc": 0.5 }
+{ "arec": { "id": 5, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/DayalHW95", "authors": "Umeshwar Dayal Eric
N. Hanson Jennifer Widom", "misc": "2002-01-03 434-456 1995 Modern Database Systems db/books/collections/kim95.html#DayalHW95",
"title": "Active Database Systems." }, "brec": { "id": 98, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.49.2910",
"title": "Active Database Systems", "authors": "Umeshwar Dayal Eric N. Hanson Jennifer Widom",
"misc": "2009-04-12 In Won Kim editor Modern Database Systems The Object Model Integrating
a production rules facility into a database system provides a uniform mechanism for a number
of advanced database features including integrity constraint enforcement, derived data maintenance,
triggers, alerters, protection, version control, and others. In addition, a database system
with rule processing capabilities provides a useful platform for large and efficient knowledge-base
and expert systems. Database systems with production rules are referred to as active database
systems, 
 and the field of active database systems has indeed been active. This chapter summarizes
current work in active database systems  topics covered include active database rule models
and languages, rule execution semantics, and implementation issues.  1 Introduction  Conventional
database systems are passive  they only execute queries or transactions explicitly submitted
by a user or an application program. For many applications, however, it is important to monitor
situations of interest, and to ... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-12 2007-11-22 1994 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.49.2910 http //www-db.stanford.edu/pub/papers/book-chapter.ps
en 10.1.1.17.1323 10.1.1.143.7196 10.1.1.50.3821 10.1.1.51.9946 10.1.1.41.2030 10.1.1.46.2504
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10.1.1.107.4220 10.1.1.47.9217 10.1.1.133.7157 10.1.1.101.5051 10.1.1.30.9989 10.1.1.53.6941
10.1.1.50.8529 10.1.1.1
 33.4287 10.1.1.50.7278 10.1.1.10.1688 10.1.1.19.8669 10.1.1.44.7600 10.1.1.144.376 10.1.1.44.1348
10.1.1.47.9998 10.1.1.90.4428 10.1.1.108.344 10.1.1.48.9470 10.1.1.53.5472 10.1.1.52.4872
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10.1.1.55.4610 10.1.1.21.3821 10.1.1.26.9208 10.1.1.31.4869 10.1.1.48.1833 10.1.1.83.8628
10.1.1.87.9318 10.1.1.90.2195 10.1.1.36.5184 10.1.1.21.1704 10.1.1.53.1733 10.1.1.90.3181
10.1.1.53.6783 10.1.1.52.6151 10.1.1.104.6911 10.1.1.105.1691 10.1.1.21.1984 10.1.1.23.2775
10.1.1.62.5556 10.1.1.68.9063 10.1.1.74.4746 10.1.1.78.5097 10.1.1.84.743 10.1.1.84.904 10.1.1.87.6019
10.1.1.88.3907 10.1.1.89.9631 10.1.1.90.4147 10.1.1.92.365 10.1.1.100.2747 10.1.1.98.5083
10.1.1.98.6663 10.1.1.99.1894 10.1.1.99.8174 10.1.1.133.8073 10.1.1.52.7823 10.1.1.39.5341
10.1.1.35.3458 10.1.1.26.4620 10.1.1.18.8936 10.1.1.19.3694 10.1.1.12.631 10.1.1.48.6394 Metadata
may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier r
 emains attached to it." }, "jacc": 1.0 }
+{ "arec": { "id": 25, "dblpid": "books/acm/kim95/RusinkiewiczS95", "authors": "Marek Rusinkiewicz
Amit P. Sheth", "misc": "2004-03-08 592-620 Modern Database Systems books/acm/Kim95 db/books/collections/kim95.html#RusinkiewiczS95
1995", "title": "Specification and Execution of Transactional Workflows." }, "brec": { "id":
88, "csxid": "oai CiteSeerXPSU 10.1.1.43.3839", "title": "Specification and Execution of Transactional
Workflows", "authors": "Marek Rusinkiewicz Amit Sheth", "misc": "2009-04-13 The basic transaction
model has evolved over time to incorporate more complex transaction structures  and to selectively
modify the atomicity and isolation properties. In this chapter we discuss the application
 of transaction concepts to activities that involve coordinated execution of multiple tasks
(possibly of  different types) over different processing entities. Such applications are referred
to as transactional  workflows. In this chapter we discuss the specification of such workflows
  and the issues involved in their  execution.  1 What is a Workflow?  Workflows are activities
involving the coordinated execution of multiple tasks performed by different processing entities.
A task defines some work to be done and can be specified in a number of ways, including a
textual description in a file or an email, a form, a message, or a computer program. A processing
entity that performs the tasks may be a person or a software system (e.g., a mailer, an application
program, a database mana... CiteSeerX ACM Press 2009-04-13 2007-11-22 1995 application/postscript
text http //citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.43.3839 http //lsdis.cs.uga.edu/lib/././download/RS93.ps
en 10.1.1.17.1323 10.1.1.59.5051 10.1.1.38.6210 10.1.1.68.7445 10.1.1.109.5175 10.1.1.17.7962
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10.1.1.52.3682 10.1.1.36.
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10.1.1.55.8770 10.1.1.54.8188 10.1.1.101.7919 10.1.1.104.8176 10.1.1.24.5741 10.1.1.29.4667
10.1.1.4.1055 10.1.1.48.9175 10.1
 .1.56.792 10.1.1.65.3172 10.1.1.66.5947 10.1.1.73.8532 10.1.1.83.8299 10.1.1.86.8521 10.1.1.87.2402
10.1.1.87.4648 10.1.1.90.5638 10.1.1.91.1709 10.1.1.94.4248 10.1.1.114.511 10.1.1.119.5037
10.1.1.124.7957 10.1.1.49.215 10.1.1.53.7777 10.1.1.53.9711 10.1.1.45.9409 10.1.1.40.8789
10.1.1.43.4845 10.1.1.34.8273 10.1.1.35.4783 10.1.1.28.3176 10.1.1.16.8151 10.1.1.8.9117 10.1.1.58.3449
10.1.1.142.7041 Metadata may be used without restrictions as long as the oai identifier remains
attached to it." }, "jacc": 1.0 }


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